Bale & Ronaldo get two each in Madrid rout

first_imgReal Madrid 7 Deportivo La Coruna 1: Seven-up for Zidane’s men as Bale shines Dom Farrell Last updated 1 year ago 01:08 1/22/18 GarethBaleNacho - cropped Getty Images Braces from Gareth Bale, Cristiano Ronaldo and Nacho saw Real Madrid emphatically back to winning ways in LaLiga against Deportivo. Gareth Bale dragged Real Madrid away from the ignominy of a third straight home defeat in LaLiga by netting a match-turning brace before Deportivo La Coruna collapsed to a 7-1 defeat.Cristiano Ronaldo and, in a more unlikely turn of events, Nacho, also notched doubles to boost under-fire boss Zinedine Zidane.Loses to Barcelona and Villarreal either side of the mid-season break contributed to leaving Madrid fourth and 19 points off the pace in the title race, and further woes awaited when Adrian Lopez capitalised on slack defending to net a 23rd-minute opener. Article continues below Editors’ Picks Lyon treble & England heartbreak: The full story behind Lucy Bronze’s dramatic 2019 Liverpool v Man City is now the league’s biggest rivalry and the bitterness is growing Megan Rapinoe: Born & brilliant in the U.S.A. A Liverpool legend in the making: Behind Virgil van Dijk’s remarkable rise to world’s best player Amid palpable unrest from the stands, Madrid steadied themselves and centre-back Nacho levelled, before Bale took centre stage.The Wales star finished exquisitely to give Zidane’s men the lead at the break and he converted Toni Kroos’ corner before the hour to make the points safe.That Bale is now Madrid’s joint-top scorer in LaLiga with six this season owes much to Ronaldo’s trials in front of goal.Those were again gruesomely evident until the five-time Ballon d’Or winner followed Luka Modric onto the scoresheet 12 minutes from time and his brave diving header preceded Nacho completing a rout that leaves Deportivo slumped in the relegation zone.FT: #RealMadrid 7-1 @RCDeportivo (@nachofi1990 32′, 88′, @GarethBale11 42′, 58′, @lm19official 68, @Cristiano 78′, 84′; Adrián 23′). #RMLiga | #HalaMadrid pic.twitter.com/Ui6GZlv51f— Real Madrid C.F. (@realmadrid) January 21, 2018Borja Mayoral was preferred in attack alongside Ronaldo and Bale by Zidane and the 20-year-old forward turned Modric’s cross goalwards to draw a fifth-minute stop from Ruben Martinez in the Deportivo goal.Madrid largely ambled through the opening exchanges, with nothing to show for their meagre efforts, and the Bernabeu faithful whistled their side when they fell behind.Florin Andone’s clever flick on caught out Dani Carvajal and Lucas Perez scooted past a napping Raphael Varane for Adrian to slide home.Marcelo was the closest player to the Deportivo goalscorer and, seemingly stung, the left-back drove an impressive response from the hosts.He saw an angled volley flash wide before Ruben brilliantly saved a Ronaldo header from the Brazil international’s 28th-minute cross.Ruben then fortuitously turned a Marcelo drive on to the base of his post and it was no surprise to see him turn provider as Nacho steered home in assured fashion.Madrid kept their momentum rumbling on and were rewarded three minutes before half-time.Ronaldo went to ground under minimal encouragement from Depor defender Fabian Schar and, as he berated the referee, Bale collected the loose ball from Marcelo’s cross and curled a sumptuous strike into the top corner.5 – Gareth Bale has scored five goals in 2018, more than any other La Liga player in all competitions. Express. pic.twitter.com/JpF08WuzJy— OptaJose (@OptaJose) January 21, 2018Five minutes into the second half, Ronaldo contrived to foul Schar as Carvajal’s low ball across the box suggested a tap-in.A sliding Mayoral was unable to provide the decisive touch at the end of Marcelo’s latest raid and, in another recurring theme of the match, Ruben showed lightning reactions in the 58th minute to deny Casemiro from Kroos’ cross.Kroos trotted over to the left flank to take the resulting corner when Bale rose unchallenged to muscularly power home the header.Mayoral headed a Bale cross off target from four yards and that miss heralded the introduction of Karim Benzema, a substitution that was whistled by a section of supporters apparently underwhelmed by the long-awaited reunion of the BBC.Ronaldo had a contribution to enjoy as his 68th-minute backheel teed up Modric to crisply net his first league goal of the season from the edge of the box.Andone should have pulled one back from close range for Deportivo before Ronaldo controlled brilliantly with his chest, only to finish with all the poise of a rank amateur.There was relief and a notable lack of his trademark celebration when Ronaldo finished Casemiro’s cross from close range.He joined Bale with a double but paid a painful price in the 84th minute, bloodied by Schar’s boot as he bravely converted a centre from substitute Lucas Vazquez.Nacho suffered far less for his own satisfaction, converting a set-piece against opponents who appeared to have clocked off before the final whistle.Key Opta stats:- This is the second time under Zidane that Madrid have scored seven goals in a single LaLiga match, the other also a 7-1 victory against Celta Vigo in March 2016.- Adrian scored his second LaLiga goal at the Santiago Bernabeu, having also scored for Atletico Madrid against Real in 2011.- After 16 matches, Nacho has already matched his best scoring record in a single LaLiga season (3).- Bale has scored eight goals in six league appearances against Deportivo.- Only Lionel Messi (17) has provided more LaLiga assists than Toni Kroos in the last two seasons – the German level with Luis Suarez on 15. read morelast_img read more

Chelsea & BVB agree Batshuayi loan

first_imgTransfers Chelsea and Borussia Dortmund reach Batshuayi loan agreement Nizaar Kinsella Click here to see more stories from this author Last updated 1 year ago 18:19 1/31/18 FacebookTwitterRedditcopy Comments() Michy Batshuayi Chelsea Newcastle 28012018 Getty Transfers Borussia Dortmund Michy Batshuayi Chelsea Premier League Bundesliga The 24-year-old striker is set to spark a chain reaction as his move paves the way for Aubameyang and Giroud to make their deadline day transfers Chelsea and Borussia Dortmund have reached an agreement that will see Michy Batshuayi join the Bundesliga side on loan for the rest of the season, Goal understands.The 24-year-old striker had been in contention to make Chelsea’s squad for their Premier League clash with Bournemouth on transfer deadline day, despite continuous links to a January transfer.Instead, he will head to Germany instead after Dortmund agreed to pay a €1.5 million fee to land the Belgium international as a replacement for Pierre-Emerick Aubameyang, who is now expected to finalise a move to Arsenal, as Arsene Wenger already admitted it looks a done deal. Article continues below Editors’ Picks Lyon treble & England heartbreak: The full story behind Lucy Bronze’s dramatic 2019 Liverpool v Man City is now the league’s biggest rivalry and the bitterness is growing Megan Rapinoe: Born & brilliant in the U.S.A. A Liverpool legend in the making: Behind Virgil van Dijk’s remarkable rise to world’s best player To complete a triangle of transfers between the three sides, Chelsea could be set to land Olivier Giroud from the Gunners to replace Batshuayi and offer backup to Alvaro Morata, having already agreed an £18m fee for the France striker.Dortmund have no option to take Batshuayi on a permanent deal at the end of his six months, however, as he remains contracted to Chelsea until June 2021.Sevilla had tried to sign Batshuayi earlier in the transfer window but have settled for Everton’s Sandro Ramirez instead. Tottenham also enquired about Batshuayi but he rejected the move to Chelsea’s rivals as he wanted to be first choice upon moving to a new club. The 24-year-old has featured 25 times for Antonio Conte’s men this season, scoring 10 times.The former Marseille star featured for a full 90 minutes in the Premier League clash with Brighton before playing a key role in their recent FA Cup win over Newcastle United, scoring twice as they ran out 3-0 victors.last_img read more

Reason behind Klaassen’s failed Napoli move revealed

first_imgTransfers Reason behind Klaassen’s failed Napoli move revealed Patrick Gleeson Last updated 1 year ago 01:14 2/3/18 FacebookTwitterRedditcopy Comments(0) Davy Klaassen Everton Getty Images Transfers Napoli Everton Benevento Arsenal Premier League Serie A The Toffees midfielder looked to make a late move to Italy during the January window, only for the transfer to collapse on deadline day Davy Klaassen’s proposed transfer to Napoli last month failed because of a “financial decision” Everton manager Sam Allardyce has confirmed.The midfielder looked set to move to the Serie A club during the latter stages of the January transfer window, only for the transfer to collapse on deadline day.Napoli’s interest in Klaassen came as a result of the Netherlands international failing to establish himself at Goodison Park since his £24 million move from Ajax in the summer.  Editors’ Picks Lyon treble & England heartbreak: The full story behind Lucy Bronze’s dramatic 2019 Liverpool v Man City is now the league’s biggest rivalry and the bitterness is growing Megan Rapinoe: Born & brilliant in the U.S.A. A Liverpool legend in the making: Behind Virgil van Dijk’s remarkable rise to world’s best player The 24-year-old has made just three Premier League starts for Everton so far this season, all of which came during Ronald Koeman’s time in charge at the club.Klaassen is yet to feature under current boss Allardyce and has been regularly left out of matchday squads since the former England manager’s arrival in Merseyside. A loan switch to the Italian top flight promised Klaassen regular playing time for the remainder of the 2017-18 campaign and was a move Allardyce was in favour with.However the move ended up breaking down at the deadline, with reports saying a dispute over image rights was the cause. The Everton boss acknowledged it was “something like that” which held up the loan, though he placed more blame on Klaassen’s representatives, rather than the player. “Apparently something like that, apparently that’s the norm at that club (Napoli),” Allardyce said. “Whatever they do as a football club that their image rights are, I don’t know the technical details, but whether their image rights are not validated or taken are over by club, I don’t know.”Allardyce later added: “Thats the power of the player with the agent, really, there’s nothing else we can do about that.“If I’m sat in that position and have an agent, the agent works for me, not the other way round. So for me it would never have been a financial decision. Even if I was losing money I’d be going, but that’s me – because I’d want to play football.“Davy wants to play football, but whether he got the full story I don’t know, because I wasn’t involved with it.”Asked if Klaassen would now be forced to train away from the first team, Allardyce said: “No, I don’t think so. (He’ll be with first team squad) because Davy Klaassen doesn’t give you the sort of problems some players do when they’re not involved.“He’s a super professional and a super lad, and he comes in and tries his best in training on every occasion.”last_img read more

Lethal Lukaku overshadows Pogba return to down Chelsea

first_imgManchester United Lethal Lukaku overshadows Pogba comeback with match-winning Chelsea showing Kris Voakes Man Utd Correspondent Last updated 1 year ago 00:12 2/26/18 FacebookTwitterRedditcopy Comments(4) Romelu Lukaku Manchester United Getty Manchester United Premier League Manchester United v Chelsea Chelsea Romelu Lukaku The Belgian front man was far too much for his former club to handle as he scored one and assisted another in a crucial 2-1 win The varying twists and turns relating to Paul Pogba’s status at Manchester United may have commanded many of the headlines in recent weeks, but that has served to overshadow a vast improvement in Romelu Lukaku’s all-round game.On Sunday, the Belgian striker scored a crucial first goal and then superbly teed up the winner for Jesse Lingard as United came from behind to secure a vital 2-1 victory over his former club Chelsea at Old Trafford on the day that Pogba returned to the starting line-up to much pomp and circumstance.While there were many pertinent questions being asked of Lukaku’s top-level ability when he arrived in Jose Mourinho’s squad from Everton, the front man has gradually improved his all-round forward play to the point where he now provides a compelling presence in the channels and handles himself well with his back to goal. Far from his immobile, lifeless performance at Stamford Bridge earlier this season, this was a buccaneering showing from the big front man. Article continues below Editors’ Picks Lyon treble & England heartbreak: The full story behind Lucy Bronze’s dramatic 2019 Liverpool v Man City is now the league’s biggest rivalry and the bitterness is growing Megan Rapinoe: Born & brilliant in the U.S.A. A Liverpool legend in the making: Behind Virgil van Dijk’s remarkable rise to world’s best player His first goal against top-eight opposition all season being the pinnacle of an excellent personal display as United collected a huge three points in the context of the Champions League race. And the Red Devils have every right to be thankful for Lukaku’s display given their horrible start which forced Mourinho to change to a 4-2-2-2 formation midway through the first half and culminated in Chelsea grabbing a 32nd-minute lead.The goal they conceded was entirely of their own making even if Chelsea deserve high praise for the electric nature of the counter-attack which saw them go one up from a United corner. Pogba failed to jump for a header against Victor Moses, then Scott McTominay gave up tracking Willian and allowed the Brazilian to roam free into the box where he collected Eden Hazard’s pass and fired a fierce shot beyond David de Gea.While both De Gea and Victor Lindelof, who decided against putting in a challenge on Hazard, will accept some degree of culpability, the damage had been done already by Pogba and McTominay’s errors.The important thing for Mourinho’s side at that point was to deliver a response, and they were able to get on level terms within seven minutes thanks to a wonderful move which saw Alexis Sanchez and Anthony Martial both involved with short, intricate passes before Lukaku took a perfect first touch and slid home clinically with his left foot.It was a move which bore little resemblance to United’s play for the large part of a sterile first half, but they were much the better side for the majority of the second.Manchester United celebrate Jesse LingardBy the time they took the lead they were arguably deserving of the three points, while Lukaku had fairly entrenched himself at the top of the voting for the Man of the Match plaudits.Having forced a great save from Thibaut Courtois with a wonderful bicycle-kick shot, Lukaku then turned provider. McTominay slotted a ball into the channel, allowing the Belgian to get in front of Antonio Rudiger before heading goalwards and sending in an inch perfect cross for Lingard to head home.Eden Hazard Chelsea Paul Pogba Manchester UnitedWhile their play was far from convincing at times, United had shown real character to dig themselves out of a hole. Led by their manager’s bold decision to switch his formation, the players eventually got a foothold in the game and made the most of their supremacy after the break. It was also no coincidence that Nemanja Matic’s best performance in months came on the afternoon United bested his former team-mates.Pogba, too, was released to cause Chelsea some problems when Mourinho changed his approach, but while the Frenchman drifted in and out of the game there was just no keeping Lukaku quiet. He might have scored 21 goals before today, but this felt like a real breakout afternoon for him. It is the least he deserves after such an improvement in standards over recent months. Check out Goal’s Premier League 2019-20 fantasy football podcast for game tips, debate and rivalries.last_img read more

Snitch Movie Promotion

first_imgThanks to our friends at STUDIOCANAL, Touch Football Australia has 10 double passes to the new Dwayne Johnson movie ‘Snitch’, only at the movies from May 16.In the fast-paced action thriller, Snitch, Dwayne Johnson stars as a father whose teenage son is wrongly accused of a drug distribution crime and is looking at a mandatory minimum prison sentence of 10 years. Desperate and determined to rescue his son at all costs, he makes a deal with the U.S. attorney to work as an undercover informant and infiltrate a drug cartel on a dangerous mission — risking everything, including his family and his own life. For your chance to win a double pass to Snitch, send an email to media@austouch.com.au telling us why you’d like to win tickets to this film. The best 10 answers will receive a double pass and TFA will be in contact with you if you are a winner. Related LinksMovie Promotionlast_img read more

6 fascinating lessons for us from the campaign trail

first_imgI recently read a very interesting article from The New York Times about how social science and behavioral economics was used to get out the vote. The article, “Academic Dream Team Helped Obama’s Effort,” details how experts like Robert Cialdini (whom I covered just this past week), formed a consortium that provided research-based ideas on motivating people to take certain actions (especially voting). Whether you are a Democrat or a Republican or of any party, the advice the academics provided is very useful to all of us involved in the work of social change. We’re all in the business of compelling people to do things. So I wanted to pass on the most interesting tips.1. People favor candidates – and organizations! – that exhibit a combination of competence and warmth. You want to seem smart but also likable.2. When countering rumors (or myths), it’s a bad idea to repeat them. People may register a denial in the short term, but they only tend to remember the rumor or myth in the long term. Don’t deny or counter something – simply assert your competing notion.3. Use people’s sense of identity to influence behavior. In the election, volunteer canvassers said, “Mr. Jones, we know you’ve voted in the past,” to prompt future voting. We can do the same with volunteers or donors: “Mr. Jones, we know you’ve supported us in the past.” People want to stick to their past behaviors, so this can work well.4. Informal commitments help. Getting people to sign a card promising to vote increases likelihood to vote, for example. Pledging is also useful in fundraising!5. Tell people to make a plan. People are more likely to follow through on a promise if they have a plan, however simple. Ask people to specify when they’ll help you.6. Use social norms. When people were told others in their neighborhood planned to vote, it influenced them. Never forget the power of peer pressure – call out your supporters to inspire others to jump on board.For more fascinating tips on how this worked during the campaign, check out the article here.last_img read more

Must-know Neuro-Nudges for Nonprofits

first_imgNetwork for Good is hosting a free webinar this Thursday, March 14 at 1 p.m. ET on neuromarketing – a topic definitely worth your time!The urge to help and give is hard-wired into the human brain. As a champion for a cause, it’s your task to tap into those recesses by appealing to that urge. The simplest things – images, words, gestures, even type fonts – can have a major effect on the potency of your message. Neuromarketing expert, Roger Dooley, has discovered some brain-science-based tweaks you can make to your print, web, and in-person outreach that will boost the effectiveness of your marketing efforts. Join Roger Dooley for this free event as he makes neuromarketing easy for nonprofits. Register here.last_img read more

How to Make the Case for Social Media

first_img Remember: This isn’t a crusade, it’s a learning experience for everyone. Make sure there IS a good case for your initiative and if it does fail, share and learn from what went wrong. There is no shame in gaining knowledge from mistakes – for you, or your boss. 1. Change the subject. If you’re having a debate over the value of social media, you’re having the wrong discussion. The discussion should be about your organization’s goals – with social media being the means, not the end. 2. Make it about what your boss already wants. Don’t position your idea as a social media initiative; frame it as your initiative to support your boss’s goals, in your boss’s language. Is donor retention a big concern for your Executive Director? Highlight how social media can help keep donors engaged. Does your board want more success stories to showcase? Underscore how social media can help make that happen. 3. Make it about the audience. A good way to depersonalize the debate over social media is to make it about your target audience’s preferences rather than a philosophical tug of war between you and said boss. 4. Sign your boss up to listen.Set up Google Alerts and TweetBeep (email alerts for Twitter mentions) for your boss, so she or he can see that there are already many discussions about your organization happening online. Once this apparent, two things are likely to happen. First, it will become clear that your organization no longer controls your message online – so worrying about social media causing a lack of control is not worth fearing. That day is already here. Second, it will be hard not to want to join those conversations online – which is what social engagement is all about. 5. Set some ground rules. Set a social media policy for your organization, so it’s clear how to respond to what you’re hearing – and what types of initiatives have internal support. 6. Start small. If you’re going to start a social media initiative, start small. Pinpoint where your supporters are and branch out from there. You don’t have to be an overnight social media expert – you just need to be a part of the conversations about your cause. 7. Set a clear goal.Just as with any other marketing effort, establish a specific, measurable goal so you can identify success. 8. Measure and report.Once you’ve identified your approach and have set a goal, ensure that you can track and measure your progress. Most social media platforms have built-in analytics and you can also track Web traffic back to your site through Google Analytics. Be sure to tie your results back to your social media efforts where possible with careful tracking. (This could mean using tracking codes on your donation pages, Google campaign tags or landing pages created specifically for your social media outreach.) Share every little bit of progress and give your boss credit for it! It’s clear that social media is an effective channel for establishing your nonprofit’s brand identity, championing your cause and engaging with current and would-be supporters. So, how do you make sure your organization is on board — especially your boss, executive director or board members? Here are eight tips for making the case for your next social media initiative: center_img Photo Source: Big Stock Photo Adapted from Nonprofit Marketing Blog.last_img read more

Free webinar: Mastering the in-person ask

first_imgIf the thought of asking for a donation in person makes you sweat, Network for Good’s next free webinar is for you.Tune in Tuesday, April 16 at 1 p.m. Eastern to hear fundraising expert Jay Frost give nonprofits the insider scoop on garnering support via one of the most powerful methods — the in-person ask.Join us and learn answers to the following: How to ask for donations in a way that is comfortable for youHow to identify your unique asking strengths and best use themWhy asking for gifts doesn’t have to be so scary!Register here.last_img read more

4 ways to create a culture of giving at your nonprofit

first_imgThe following post is a summary of Adam Grant’s presentation on his book Give and Take: A Revolutionary Approach to Success at the Conference on Volunteering and Service.In Give and Take, Adam Grant’s premise is that there is more to the secret of success than hard work, talent and luck – especially as the world continues to become more hyper-connected. What’s missing is generosity. Givers excel in a collaborative work environment, but can burn out easily if they don’t see the impact of their contributions or don’t learn how to set boundaries. This is especially true for people in helping professions such as nonprofit leadership, cause marketing and social responsibility.Here are Adam’s 4 tips for creating a cultures of successful givers at your organization.1. Get the right people on the bus (a nod to Jim Collins)Weed out the takers and encourage matches to take their cues from the givers. Rewarding giver behavior and helping matchers see the value in reciprocity with a net positive benefit will nudge your culture towards a collaborative, generous workplace.2. Reduce costsThink about the power of 5-minute favors. You don’t have to be Mother Theresa or Gandhi to call yourself a giver. Giver mentality is more about finding efficient ways to make low-cost gestures with high value to the receiver. You’ve heard of micro-volunteering? Think of it as micro-favors. If someone asks you for help and you know you are the best equipped to help and the act will only take you 5 minutes, say yes. Always. If you are not the best equipped to respond, point the person in a new direction to find the help they need.3. Show impactSome givers burn out others are energized by doing favors – why? Givers burn out when they can’t see the value of their impact. Think of ways to have authentic messengers demonstrate the value your staff creates every day. A message from the CEO is nice, but givers are more motivated by a thank you from a program beneficiary or an employee who gave in a personally meaningful way. Showing impact in a tangible way relates to the concept of the ‘identifiable victim’ or ‘singularity effect’ – people are more compassionate when they can relate to one person’s story.4. Encourage help-seekingA whopping 75-90% of helping starts with a request, yet people hesitate to ask for help – especially givers. Givers don’t want to be a burden and often confuse taking and receiving. We need to create work cultures that reward asking for help and make it ok for people to take it. Also, givers to ask for help so other people (namely matchers) have the opportunity to give and so givers know who can benefit from their help and how in the future.Here’s an example of how help-seeking improves results. Appletree Answers, a call center solutions provider, was experiencing 98% staff turnover each year. That’s a huge HR hiring burden to replace your staff every year. The company started internal employee wish program where employees could ask for help fulfilling their dreams and other employees could offer assistance to making those wishes come true. As a result of creating this culture of giving and receiving, staff turnover dropped to 33%.Your organization can create its own Reciprocity Ring. Here’s how.· Invite employees to join the program.· Have everyone participating make a request.· Everyone in the program then tries to help make those requests happen.· Everyone is both a giver and a receiver, so there is no stigma about asking for help.· Everyone gets better understanding of the resources in their network for future giving and receiving. by Kate Olsen, VP of Strategic Projects at Network for Good @Kate4Goodlast_img read more

4 Tips for Subject Lines That Work

first_imgBefore: Take the Farm Friends SurveyAfter: Farm Friends Asks: What’s Your Fantasy Meal? Subject lines are more important than you might think. On average, at least 100 emails flood your constituents’ inboxes every single day. That’s a lot of digital noise to shout over, which is why your email subject lines need as much TLC as the content inside. Here’s a simple, four-step makeover to help transform your subject lines from ho-hum to “Oh, wow!” 1. State the ObviousDon’t dance around the point of your email. Talk straight to your recipients about what they’ll find inside. You can be creative and pique curiosity, but for best results, make sure you answer the question, “What’s this email about?” If you make readers think too hard, they may just opt to delete without reading and move on to their next message. For newsletters, highlight the key piece of content you’re sending—a subject line like “Fall 2013 Newsletter” is easy to gloss over in a busy inbox.Before: All the news that’s fit to emailAfter: The Top 10 Women in Science 4. Keep It ShortMake every word count. After you’ve written your subject line, go back and delete words or phrases that don’t add value. Ideally, stick with around 50 characters or less. Some studies have found that the 28- to 39-character range is the sweet spot for maximum open rates.Before: Final reminder to make reservations to attend the Strutting Dog Gala on October 15, 2013!After: Strutting Dog Gala: Last day to RSVP! 3. Avoid the Spam TrapWhy bother with killer content if your subject line gets it caught in the spam filter? Keep your message front and center by avoiding things like cute symbols and special characters—spam filter magnets that attract the wrong kind of attention. Subject lines containing the words help, RE, or FWD are often interpreted as scams.Before: ♥♥♥You will LOVE these PREMIUM GIFTS for your donation!!!♥♥♥After: Cool donor gifts from Heart Healthy Houston! 2. Stand Out from the Crowd In a sea of emails, it helps to be a little different. Add a touch of visual interest with brackets, quotes, a smidge (just a smidge) of all caps, or an exclamation point (just one!). Personalize your subject line with the recipient’s city or state, which typically generate higher open rates than first or last names. Instead of telling people what’s inside, try asking a question that piques their curiosity.Before: SafeSurf loves its volunteersAfter: SafeSurf LOVES its volunteers! Before: Hot dog! Get down and boogie with your beagle!After: Join Long Island Pet Rescue’s Fall Frolic Before: RE: Help a veteran find a homeAfter Homes for Heroes Fall Fundraiser wants you! Revamping your subject lines with these simple tips can make a big difference in your email open rates. You might even see a boost in constituent engagement and giving!Don’t forget:Your email subject lines can show how much you respect your constituents’ busy schedules by telling them exactly what they’ll find inside.It’s okay to add a little visual interest to your subject line, just don’t overdo it and catch the eye of the spam filter instead.Short and sweet is best when it comes to subject lines. Always try to keep them under 50 characters. Before: Books for Kids is Coming to your neighborhoodAfter: Books for Kids is Coming to Newport!last_img read more

Social Media Housekeeping Tips for Nonprofits

first_imgIs it easy to find you on Twitter and Facebook? Include links to your profiles on your website, email newsletters, and staff email signatures. Always include a short description about your organization and a link back to your website in your social media profiles’ “about” section. Think about social media as a way to open the doors of your organization to new guests and friends. But unlike hosting guests at your home for an hour or two, social media is open to guests 24/7. Because of the constant accessibility of social media, keeping profiles tidy all the time is a must. Here are some tips and ideas for social media housekeeping that you can tackle right now:Your social media avatar/profile pictures should mesh with your nonprofit brand and be recognizable to fans of your cause. Consider creating a special page on your nonprofit website that is solely dedicated to visitors from social media. Don’t let replies and comments linger—use them as an opportunity to engage your community. Set up alerts to use social media as a listening platform: @ mentions, hashtags, keywords about your cause, etc. Start tracking and planning your organization’s tweets. Programs such as HootSuite, TweetDeck and Sprout Social can help you plan tweets in advance and monitor replies, mentions, and hashtags. Is your nonprofit’s Facebook profile picture just as good as your cover image? While this may be obvious, it’s worth stating that your Facebook profile picture will be seen more often than your cover image. Be consistent with your hashtags. One small typo could add your tweets to a hashtag conversation that you didn’t intend to join! Don’t forget to post pictures. Photos help your Facebook posts stand out on your fan’s news feeds. Use compelling images to make an emotional connection and engage more supporters with your cause. Encourage more likes, shares, and comments. More likes and shares increase the odds that your post will be seen by friends and friends of friends. Start analyzing the types of posts that get shared the most by exporting your Facebook insights and taking an hour or two to dive into the data.last_img read more

Hey Girl, I See What Your Nonprofit Is Doing

first_imgBy tapping into the #tigerblood hashtag, Zachary reported that tons of media outlets picked up on the story, resulting in a modest increase in blood donations.So what’s in it for you? Why should you consider making a meme? 1. Sure, memes can be just plain silly and fun, and but they can also humanize your nonprofit’s public image. Who doesn’t love an organization that embraces its humanity and sense of humor? 2. Memes can create connections and start conversations because of their two-prong premise: A meme is based on an aspect of popular culture and spread from person to person. 3. Memes give supporters an easy way to publicize and promote your cause. Once you create a meme, fans can quickly share it over email, social media, and their own websites.Want to create your own nonprofit meme to help build buzz for your cause? Check out our tips on using memes to spread your nonprofit’s message. (Image credit: National Wildlife Federation, Source: Avi Kaplan) You’ve seen them all over Facebook, YouTube, Tumblr, and Pinterest: grumpycats,talking babies, even Ryan Gosling. Entertaining memes have exploded across the Internet. But have you also noticed an uptick in charitable memes, memes that are doing good? Many nonprofits are capitalizing on the popularity of memes to gain visibility and connect with new supporters.Nonprofits aren’t always great at piggybacking on the work of others, but that’s the key for a meme to take off. Senior Strategist Avi Kaplan of RAD Campaign has compiled some tip-top examples of nonprofit memes that worked because they borrowed a cultural phenomena, as did tech writer Zachary Sniderman.One of the best examples of nonprofit meme-jacking came from a 132-year-old organization, the American Red Cross. Capitalizing on Charlie Sheen’s 2011 outburst and proclamation to have drank tiger’s blood, the American Red Cross tweeted:We may not collect #tigerblood, but we know our donors & volunteers have fierce passion for doing good! #RedCrossMonth— American Red Cross (@RedCross)last_img read more

Is your nonprofit website open for business?

first_imgIs your nonprofit website sending the right message to potential donors? Year-end fundraising season will be here before you know it. Now is the time to clear away the cobwebs and roll out the welcome mat for prospective donors, volunteers, and those who may benefit from your work. If you haven’t updated your site in a while, you might give donors the impression that your organization is no longer active.Worried your site may say “move along” instead of “come on in”? Here are the top issues that can scare visitors away from your nonprofit website (and how to fix them).Broken linksThey’re not just aggravating and confusing for your website visitors, broken links can also be a big red flag for search engines like Google. Having internal links that don’t work or that don’t point to real content can affect how your site shows up in search.How to fix it: Most website platforms and content management systems have reporting that will show you the top pages that are returning an error. Taking a close look at your Google Analytics can help as well. Do some internal testing on your website to make sure all of your links are taking visitors where they should. Stale content Do you still have information about your “upcoming event” on your home page even though the “upcoming event” took place several months ago? Is the last post on your nonprofit’s blog from 2012? This is a surefire sign that no one in your organization is actually looking at your website. To your visitors, it says: we gave up.How to fix it: Make it someone’s responsibility to frequently review your website and do regular housekeeping. If you have a news feed or blog that shows up on your home page, make sure you’re adding new content frequently. If you don’t have a plan to add new items, remove these feeds from your pages. Dated designThis one is somewhat subjective, but there are certain hallmarks of an outdated web design: crazy animations, hard to read text (usually light text on dark background, or a veritable rainbow of font colors), randomly-placed images, to name a few. Geocities is dead. It’s time for your nonprofit website to move on to better things.How to fix it: A complete makeover would be nice, but if that’s not in the cards, focus on fixing the most egregious cosmetic issues within your current design and platform. Start with your key pages and branch out from there. Make it easy to read and remove anything that makes your site look like this. No contact informationThe lights may be on, but without obvious and current contact information, is anyone really home? Your contact details give people an easy way to ask questions and find out more, plus openly listing this information on your website is a sign of trust and transparency. How to fix it: Add your physical address, phone number, and a way to email you to the footer of your website. Place clear links to your “Contact Us” page within your site’s global navigation. No clear way to donateThis is the first thing I look for when I am asked to review an organization’s website, and it’s amazing how many nonprofits still don’t have a prominently placed donation button on every page of their website. Without a clear and highly visible way to donate, you’re effectively telling donors: we don’t need your money. How to fix it: Make your donate button big, bold, and above the fold of your website. Make sure your donate button actually says “Donate Now”, “Donate”, or “Give”. Fuzzy language won’t cut it here. Slow to loadOne Mississippi, two Mississippi … by three Mississippi your website better be finished loading, or most visitors will simply leave. It may not be fair, but people are impatient. They have better things to do than to wait for your carousel of images or Flash presentation to load. How to fix it: Start by confirming there are no technical problems with your website’s platform or hosting service. Then, take a hard look at your website’s key pages and see how you can streamline them by removing extraneous images, code, or other files that are bogging down your site. A reputable web developer can also provide suggestions for other improvements that can speed up your site. (Bonus: Decluttering your site will have a positive effect on potential donors, making it easy for them to figure out what it is you do and why they should care.) Not mobile friendlyWhen your nonprofit website is difficult to load (or completely dead) on a mobile device, you may as well not exist for that smartphone user. 56% of US adults are smartphone users, and they’re becoming more and more likely to read your emails and social media outreach on a mobile device. If your links take them to a site that’s non-functional on their phone, you’ve missed out on another opportunity to connect.How to fix it: You don’t need a complete overhaul to make your website more mobile friendly. Focus on a handful of key pages (think: home page, donation page, contact page, any other pages you point to regularly from emails or social media) and improve them with these 8 tips for making your nonprofit website mobile friendly. (Bonus: Most mobile-friendly website tweaks will improve usability overall.)What are your biggest website challenges? Have you made a recent change to your site that’s made a big difference? Chime in with your thoughts in the comments below.last_img read more

Resources and inspiration for the next 90 days

first_imgWhere does the time go? There are just ninety days left until the end of the year. This means that you’re probably putting the final touches on your year-end fundraising plans and have a solid campaign ready to go. Not so much? First, don’t panic. There’s still plenty of time to create a solid plan and get the most out of the year-end giving season. Take a deep breath, then carve out some time to review your goals and start honing your campaign materials. Here at Network for Good, we recently published two free fundraising guides that can help you plan your marketing efforts and create a great appeal. You can download them here (registration required): How to Make the Case for Giving 7 Steps to Your Best Nonprofit Marketing Plan EverSecond, surround yourself with inspiration and smart advice. Our goal is to supply both with this blog, and here are a few of our favorites to add to your list:Future Fundraising Now: No-nonsense practical advice from Jeff Brooks, one of our favorite fundraising gurus.Sasha Dichter’s Blog: Big thoughts on giving from the mastermind behind Generosity Day.Sea Change Strategies: Alia and Mark offer simply brilliant thoughts on nonprofit storytelling, effective appeals, strategic planning, and everything in between.Fundraiser Grrl: When you need a laugh, Fundraiser Grrl totally gets it.For more inspiration, check out the Nonprofit Boot Camp and Social Media for Nonprofits conference happening on October 10 & 11 in San Francisco. Our friends at Social Media for Nonprofits have put together some great workshops to help your organization be the best it can be. There’s still time to register, and you can save $20 off with the code “N4G”.last_img read more

Creating new partnerships for your cause

first_imgWe’ve all heard it before, “Give me your Rolodex, give me 20 names that I can contact.” It can be overwhelming to produce a big list of people who are eager to raise money for your cause. But what if 20 names is 19 too many? What if all you need is just one? This is the idea proposed by philanthropist Jeffrey Walker and fundraising expert Jennifer McCrea in their recent book, The Generosity Network.Reach out.Asking your nonprofit board members for just one person who might be interested in joining your cause will seem more manageable to them and is more likely to generate a thoughtful response. That way, you can meet with someone who is open to starting a relationship with you and—ultimately—your organization.Meet in an intimate setting.Invite your new contact to meet, but beware of asking them to your office! Conference rooms can be beautiful spaces: great for viewing PowerPoints, but actually hosting an intimate first meeting? Forget it! Go to coffee or breakfast so that you can be in a space that is made for conversation. In a coffee shop, sharing your story won’t come across as rehearsed the way it automatically would in a conference room or at someone’s desk. Context is everything.Form a connection.Remember, this first meeting isn’t a sales call; it’s a chance to authentically connect. Be ready to ask what your new contact truly values and consider saying, “For the record, I’m not going to ask you for money today.” If people think you’re just there to extract something from them, they might beworrying about your potential ask. If they’re only half listening, it will be hard to build a relationship of trust and explore a potential partnership. But don’t wait too long to ask for a commitment! It’s important to share what your organization is doing and what you could achieve together.For more ideas on developing a relationship with your donors and how to turn them from one-time customers into lifelong partners, access the archived webinar presentation of Nonprofit 911: Build Your Generosity Network with Jennifer McCrea and Jeff Walker.last_img read more

5 rules for thanking donors

first_imgHere at Network for Good we experienced a busy giving season right up to the final hours of 2013. This is good news for nonprofits, as we saw a 16% increase in dollars donated compared to the year-end fundraising season of 2012. After all of that activity, it can be tempting to take it easy for a few weeks now that January is here. Of course, the reality is that your work with donors is just beginning. Now is your opportunity to begin turning year-end donors into your long-term partners in good. To do so, you need a solid plan to welcome these donors, keep them informed, and build relationships with them throughout the year. The first step is to keep the magic alive with a well-planned donor gratitude strategy. Here are some things to keep in mind:Thank your donors as soon as possible. Ideally, your online donors have already received an automatic thank you and receipt, and offline donors are receiving their thank yous in the mail shortly. Thanking donors promptly is not just common courtesy, it’s positive reinforcement of their decision to support and trust your organization.A receipt is not a thank you. Yes, you must make sure your donors get donation receipts that include information on tax deductibility. That said, if the most interesting line your response to a donor’s gift is “No goods or services were received by the donor as a result of this gift,” you’re doing it wrong. (See also: IRS rules on acknowledging contributions.)One thank you is not enough. You’ve acknowledged all of your year-end donations with a proper thank you. You’re done, right? Not so fast. One great thank you is a good start, but don’t forgo regularly thanking donors to keep them up to date on the impact of their gifts. Don’t leave donors wondering, “Whatever happened to that person/animal/cause in need?”Don’t forget other donation sources. Acknowledge every donation your organization receives, whether they come from your direct mail campaign, your online donation page, or from third-party sources such as employee giving programs, peer-to-peer fundraisers, or online giving portals. Understand all of your donation sources and tailor your notes of appreciation, where necessary. New donors coming in from a peer-to-peer campaign, for example, may need a more formal introduction to your organization than donors you’ve directly solicited.Make sure your thank you is sincere and memorable. You may have a template for your donor thank yous, but if your thank you feels like a form letter, it needs more work. Express authentic gratitude for your donors’ generosity and put them in the middle of the work you do. Use photos, quotes, and even video to help bring these stories to life for your supporters. Give donors a thank you so amazing that they can’t wait to show it off to their friends and family. Need some help with your thank you letters? Here are a few resources from our learning center: How to Treat Your Donor Like Your SuperheroKey Qualities for Amazing Thank You Letters3 Things Your Donor Thank You Should Do6 Keys to Donor RetentionAre you sending an amazing thank you this year? Have you received one? Share your examples in the comments and we’ll feature the best ones in an upcoming post!last_img read more

Give Local America: An opportunity to grow online

first_imgNetwork for Good is happy to partner with Kimbia to extend the reach of Give Local America, a nation-wide giving day that marks the 100-year milestone of community foundations in the United States.This national online giving event will take on May 6, 2014. Give Local America is expected to be the largest online giving day ever held on a single platform. Giving days help nonprofits connect with new donors in an easy and efficient way. Give Local America uses the power and pride of local communities to tie it all together. Want to find out more and get involved? To sign up, visit www.givelocalamerica.org, find your city, and follow the easy registration process.last_img read more

Facebook Ads – Are They Right For Your Nonprofit?

first_img1. What is my goal?Without a goal, your ad campaign will mean nothing and you will be simply throwing money away (and trust me, Facebook doesn’t mind taking it). A reasonable goal could be an increase in email signups from your website. When you create your ad, this will be called the “advertising objective” – it’s what you want people to do when they encounter your ad. Cody suggests (and I agree) that you pick a goal much more in depth than simple clicks to your website. Do you want to measure “website conversions”, which means that when people visit your website, they take an action and “convert”?A successful “conversion” could be signing up for your email newsletter, subscribing to your blog, or making an online donation. 3. Can I afford it? Much has been written recently about the changes in Facebook’s algorithm and its pay-to-play philosophy.Many nonprofits who spent years or months building up an engaged online community on the biggest social network are now seeing a dramatic decline in the number of fans they are able to reach with each post.If this sounds familiar, you may be wondering if Facebook Ads will help your nonprofit reach more fans and get more bang for your Facebook buck.At the recent Social Media for Nonprofits Conference in Boston, Cody Damon of Media Cause provided some insightful advice on whether or not a nonprofit should jump into the Facebook Ads ocean.Before you sit down and purchase a Facebook Ad for your nonprofit, ask yourself these three vital questions:center_img 2. Can I measure it?Whatever the objective, make sure that you can measure it. Just saying “raising awareness for my nonprofit” may not be enough, unless you have specific benchmarks in place to measure your progress.You need to know what success looks like. What will happen if your Facebook Ad is successful? What will have changed? Clients frequently ask me about the price of Facebook Ads. Unlike traditional newspaper ads or billboards, there is no set price for a Facebook Ad.You can set your daily budget, or “lifetime” budget, and you will need to choose a CPM (cost per thousand impressions) or CPC (cost per click bid). You only pay for the impressions or clicks that your ad receives, and if they are targeted well, this can be very effective.If this all seems like Greek to you, you are probably not ready to run a Facebook Ad without outside help. Facebook has a great help center on their website, and there are many firms and consultants who can help you set it up and run it.General best practices for your Facebook Ad:It must be eye-catching and well-written. Do not use your logo and call it “Come to our website!”It must have a photo. For all ads, the best size image to upload is 1200×627 pixels,The photo cannot contain more than 20% text.If it directs to an outside website, it should direct to a specific landing page, rather than just the main home page of your website.For more on using Facebook Ads to build your online community and engage with your fans, read these great posts by Jon Loomer, John Haydon, Nancy Schwartz and David Serfaty.Julia Campbell works with nonprofits to help them raise money online, conquer social media, and become content experts. Her blog on nonprofit marketing is at www.jcsocialmarketing.comlast_img read more