He Said It What a beautiful win It always takes

first_imgHe Said It“What a beautiful win. It always takes 60 minutes to play this game, that’s why they put it on the clock. It wasn’t the prettiest 45, but it was a nice 15.” — Cardinals head coach Bruce AriansUp NextThe Cardinals host the NFC North-leading Detroit Lions (7-2) Sunday at University of Phoenix Stadium. Kickoff is at 2:25 p.m. with pregame coverage starting at 10:30 a.m. on Arizona Sports 98.7 FM. – / 39 Arizona’s running game never got on track. The Cardinals had only 28 yards on 22 carries against the talented St. Louis front seven. Andre Ellington had a season-low 23 yards on 18 carries, although he did score on a three-yard touchdown run in the second quarter to open the scoring for Arizona. Five of Ellington’s 18 carries went for negative yardage and the Cardinals’ longest run was only five yards.Noted• Rookie Chandler Catanzaro tied an NFL record when he connected on a 43-yard field goal in the second quarter. It was Catanzaro’s 17th straight make at the start of his career, tying Washington’s Kai Forbath. However, he’d miss a 53-yard field goal attempt in the fourth quarter to snap the string.• The Cardinals are now 15-3 in their last 18 games, dating back to last season.• Palmer failed to throw a touchdown pass, snapping a streak of 18 games with at least one.Player of the GameCalais Campbell was a monster Sunday. The Arizona defensive end had six tackles, two sacks, four tackles for loss and two other quarterback hurries. You can certainly make an argument for Peterson as well. One play after getting flagged on a very iffy illegal contact penalty, Peterson picked off Davis for his first interception of the season. His second, on St. Louis’ next drive, was returned for a touchdown that effectively iced the game. Top Stories 0 Comments   Share   Former Cardinals kicker Phil Dawson retires Grace expects Greinke trade to have emotional impactcenter_img GLENDALE, Ariz. — There’s just something about this football team.The “next man up” mentality was put to the test once again Sunday, and once again the Arizona Cardinals passed that test.Trailing 14-10 midway through the fourth quarter, Drew Stanton relieved the injured Carson Palmer and found John Brown on a scintillating 48-yard touchdown pass that gave the Cardinals the lead.Patrick Peterson and Antonio Cromartie would add defensive touchdowns 1:15 apart and the Cardinals would go on to beat the St. Louis Rams 31-14 at a sold-out University of Phoenix Stadium. Derrick Hall satisfied with D-backs’ buying and selling The 5: Takeaways from the Coyotes’ introduction of Alex Meruelo Now the bad news. Palmer was pressured by St. Louis safety Mark Barron on a third down, and moved forward in the pocket. When his left foot hit the ground, Palmer buckled and went down without any contact from the Rams defense. He stayed on the field for several minutes and walked off under his own power — the knee buckling again as he reached the sideline. He was then carted to the Arizona locker room.Head coach Bruce Arians said the team had no information on Palmer’s condition, but he would undergo an MRI and hopefully results would be available by Tuesday.With the win, the Cardinals push their league-best record to 8-1 on the season.The Good Stanton, who quarterbacked the Cardinals to two wins in Palmer’s absence earlier this season, completed all three of his passes on his first drive, covering 86 yards.The defense was amazing again, holding the Rams to 244 total yards, forcing three turnovers and scoring two defensive touchdowns. They also sacked St. Louis QB Austin Davis six times after having only eight sacks in their first eight games.The BadThe Cardinals’ defense was solid again, but got victimized by the big 59-yard pass from Davis to Jared Cook in the second quarter.last_img read more

Sleep supports antioxidant processes study suggests

first_imgJul 18 2018Understanding sleep has become increasingly important in modern society, where chronic loss of sleep has become rampant and pervasive. As evidence mounts for a correlation between lack of sleep and negative health effects, the core function of sleep remains a mystery. But in a new study publishing 12 July in the open access journal PLOS Biology, Vanessa Hill, Mimi Shirasu-Hiza and colleagues at Columbia University, New York, found that short-sleeping fruit fly mutants shared the common defect of sensitivity to acute oxidative stress, and thus that sleep supports antioxidant processes. Understanding this ancient bi-directional relationship between sleep and oxidative stress in the humble fruit fly could provide much-needed insight into modern human diseases such as sleep disorders and neurodegenerative diseases. A defect shared among short-sleeping fruit fly mutants suggests that sleep supports antioxidant processes. Credit: pbio.2005206 Why do we sleep? During sleep, animals are vulnerable, immobile, and less responsive to their environments; they are unable to forage for food, mate, or run from predators. Despite the cost of sleep behavior, almost all animals sleep, suggesting that sleep fulfills an essential and evolutionarily conserved function from humans to fruit flies.The researchers reasoned that if sleep is required for a core function of health, animals that sleep significantly less than usual should all share a defect in that core function. For this study, they used a diverse group of short-sleeping Drosophila (fruit fly) mutants. They found that these short-sleeping mutants do indeed share a common defect: they are all sensitive to acute oxidative stress.Related StoriesSleep quality and fatigue among women with premature ovarian insufficiencyPink noise enhances deep sleep for people with mild cognitive impairmentNovel bed system with VR brainwave-control for sleep blissOxidative stress results from excess free radicals that can damage cells and lead to organ dysfunction. Toxic free radicals, or reactive oxygen species, build up in cells from normal metabolism and environmental damage. If the function of sleep is to defend against oxidative stress, then increasing sleep should increase resistance to oxidative stress. Hill and co-workers used both pharmacological and genetic methods to show that this is true.Finally, the authors proposed, if sleep has antioxidant effects, then surely oxidative stress might regulate sleep itself. Consistent with this hypothesis, they found that reducing oxidative stress in the brain by overexpressing antioxidant genes also reduced the amount of sleep. Taken together, these results point to a bi-directional relationship between sleep and oxidative stress—that is, sleep functions to defend the body against oxidative stress and oxidative stress in turn helps to induce sleep.This work is relevant to human health because sleep disorders are correlated with many diseases that are also associated with oxidative stress, such as Alzheimer’s, Parkinson’s, and Huntington’s diseases. Sleep loss could make individuals more sensitive to oxidative stress and subsequent disease; conversely, pathological disruption of the antioxidant response could also lead to loss of sleep and associated disease pathologies.Source: https://www.plos.orglast_img read more