Mouth To Mouth Wild Run Ride Hits The Beach On Memorial Day

first_imgFacebook0TwitterEmailPrintFriendly分享The 6th Annual Mouth to Mouth Wild Run & Ride is scheduled for Memorial Day Monday, May 27. 10-Mile Mouth to Mouth Wild Run & RideThe 2019 Mouth to Mouth Wild Run & Ride includes a 1-mile beach run or fat bike ride between Kasilof River mouth and the mouth of the Kenai River.  Day of event registration opens at noon.  Race time is set for 2 p.m.The race start will be located at the Kasilof River Special Use Area off Kasilof Beach Stub Rd and the finish line at the Kenai South Beach parking lot off Cannery Rd.Early registration is available for $30 ($25 for Cook Inlet Keepers members) and day of event registration is $40. 3-Mile Fun Run EventIn addition, a 3-mile beach run from Cannery Road beach to the Kenai River mouth and return will begin at 3 p.m. on Monday.   Start time for the 3-mile run is 3 p.m. at Cannery Road beach access off Dunes Road.last_img read more

The Wilmington Insider For September 2 2018

first_imgWILMINGTON, MA — Below is a round-up of what’s going on in Wilmington on Sunday, September 2, 2018:Happening Today:Weather: Cloudy through mid morning, then gradual clearing, with a high near 82. Calm wind becoming south 5 to 9 mph in the afternoon.In The Community: The Wilmington Farmers Market continues its season from 10am to 1pm on the Swain Green (across from the Town Common). See this week’s lineup HERE.In The Community: The Middlesex Canal Museum and Visitors’ Center (71 Faulkner Street, North Billerica) is open from noon to 4pm.  Learn about the canal, which travels through Wilmington.MBTA Reminder: There will be no weekend commuter rail service on the Lowell Line (Wilmington Center) until December. A free shuttle bus will be available. Learn more HERE.Food Shopping: Food shopping in town this week?  In case you haven’t seen this week’s circulars, Wilmington Apple has you covered:This week’s circular from Market Basket (260 Main Street) can be found HERE.This week’s circular from Lucci’s Market (211 Lowell Street) can be found HERE.Elia’s Country Store (381 Middlesex Avenue) does not have an online circular, but the store posts its hot entree schedule and other specials on its Facebook page HERE.(NOTE: What did I miss? Let me know by commenting below, commenting on the Facebook page, or emailing wilmingtonapple@gmail.com. I may be able to update this post.)Like Wilmington Apple on Facebook. Follow Wilmington Apple on Twitter. Follow Wilmington Apple on Instagram. Subscribe to Wilmington Apple’s daily email newsletter HERE. Got a comment, question, photo, press release, or news tip? Email wilmingtonapple@gmail.com.Share this:TwitterFacebookLike this:Like Loading… Related5 Things To Do In Wilmington On Sunday, September 1, 2019In “5 Things To Do Today”5 Things To Do In Wilmington On Sunday, August 4, 2019In “5 Things To Do Today”5 Things To Do In Wilmington On Sunday, July 14, 2019In “5 Things To Do Today”last_img read more

Nonavian dinosaur found to have laid blue eggs

first_img(A) Pair of oviraptorid Heyuannia eggs (NMNS CYN-2004-DINO-05) from the Chinese province of Jiangxi before sampling. Porosity measurements and calculations of water vapor conductance are based on these eggs. Pieces of eggshell from each of the four zones depicted in (B) were used in porosity measurements. (B) Egg model separated into four zones used for zonal porosity measurements. Credit: PeerJ (2017). DOI: 10.7717/peerj.3706 This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only. (Phys.org)—A team of researchers from Germany and the U.S. has found that a non-avian dinosaur living in what is now China laid colored eggs. In their paper published on the peer-reviewed site PeerJ, the team describes their study of the egg fossils and what their findings suggest about the evolution of colored eggs in modern birds. More information: Jasmina Wiemann et al. Dinosaur origin of egg color: oviraptors laid blue-green eggs, PeerJ (2017). DOI: 10.7717/peerj.3706AbstractProtoporphyrin (PP) and biliverdin (BV) give rise to the enormous diversity in avian egg coloration. Egg color serves several ecological purposes, including post-mating signaling and camouflage. Egg camouflage represents a major character of open-nesting birds which accomplish protection of their unhatched offspring against visually oriented predators by cryptic egg coloration. Cryptic coloration evolved to match the predominant shades of color found in the nesting environment. Such a selection pressure for the evolution of colored or cryptic eggs should be present in all open nesting birds and relatives. Many birds are open-nesting, but protect their eggs by continuous brooding, and thus exhibit no or minimal eggshell pigmentation. Their closest extant relatives, crocodiles, protect their eggs by burial and have unpigmented eggs. This phylogenetic pattern led to the assumption that colored eggs evolved within crown birds. The mosaic evolution of supposedly avian traits in non-avian theropod dinosaurs, however, such as the supposed evolution of partially open nesting behavior in oviraptorids, argues against this long-established theory. Using a double-checking liquid chromatography ESI-Q-TOF mass spectrometry routine, we traced the origin of colored eggs to their non-avian dinosaur ancestors by providing the first record of the avian eggshell pigments protoporphyrin and biliverdin in the eggshells of Late Cretaceous oviraptorid dinosaurs. The eggshell parataxon Macroolithus yaotunensis can be assigned to the oviraptor Heyuannia huangi based on exceptionally preserved, late developmental stage embryo remains. The analyzed eggshells are from three Late Cretaceous fluvial deposits ranging from eastern to southernmost China. Reevaluation of these taphonomic settings, and a consideration of patterns in the porosity of completely preserved eggs support an at least partially open nesting behavior for oviraptorosaurs. Such a nest arrangement corresponds with our reconstruction of blue-green eggs for oviraptors. According to the sexual signaling hypothesis, the reconstructed blue-green eggs support the origin of previously hypothesized avian paternal care in oviraptorid dinosaurs. Preserved dinosaur egg color not only pushes the current limits of the vertebrate molecular and associated soft tissue fossil record, but also provides a perspective on the potential application of this unexplored paleontological resource. Citation: Non-avian dinosaur found to have laid blue eggs (2017, September 20) retrieved 18 August 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2017-09-non-avian-dinosaur-laid-blue-eggs.html Explore furthercenter_img Journal information: PeerJ © 2017 Phys.org Tracing the evolution of bird reproduction Many modern birds lay colored eggs—some are monochrome, like blue robin’s eggs; others are multi-colored like those of the dove. But until now, it was believed that all dinosaur eggs were white because dinosaurs laid their eggs in protected nests. In this new effort, the researchers have found an example of a dinosaur that laid blue or green eggs.The team reports that theirs was the first effort to seriously study color in dinosaur eggs. It came about after the team noted some Heyuannia huangi fossilized eggs that had a bluish tint—researchers had previously assumed the tint was due to mineralization, but the new team thought maybe there was more to it. Prior research had shown that Heyuannia huangi were dinosaurs with parrot-like beaks that walked on hind legs. The team used mass spectrometry and chromatographic separation to take a closer look at the eggs and detected traces of biliverdin and protoporphyrin, pigments commonly found in modern colored bird eggs. The eggs were also dated back to the Late Cretaceous period, which ran from 100 to 66 million years ago.The oviraptor Heyuannia huangi were also feathered dinosaurs—many of their fossils have been found over the years, but until now, no one suspected that they laid colored eggs. The coloring, the team suggests, is a strong indication that the eggs were laid in open nests—the coloring would have served as camouflage. In modern birds, only those that lay them in open nests are colored. Their finding also shows that egg coloring began before the evolution of modern birds—it started with non-avian dinosaurs and was passed down to modern ancestors.The researchers report that as a result of their find, they are taking a look at other fossilized dinosaur eggs to see if perhaps some of those also were colored.last_img read more

Bruno Cattan Canal Overseas will broadcast a new

first_imgBruno CattanCanal+ Overseas will broadcast a new package of digital terrestrial TV (DTT) channels in French-speaking Africa, starting from the end of 2015.The Canal+ subsidiary will transmit the new pay TV offering of channels to DTT transmitters in approximately ten French-speaking countries.The service is due to launch by the end of the year will comprise a basic package of 25 channels and a selection of national channels per country.“Digital switchover is a unique opportunity for Africa and its broadcasting landscape. It opens the door to new channels with improved image quality and more locally produced programmes that better meet viewer expectations,” said Bruno Cattan, technology and web director of Canal+ Overseas.“We wanted to seize this opportunity and will use Eutelsat’s powerful African satellite resources to launch a television service that will enable a large number of households on the continent to enjoy the best that television can offer.”Canal+ Overseas has leased a 72MHz transponder on the Eutelsat 3B satellite to deliver the Canal+ channel offering.Michel Azibert, Eutelsat’s deputy CEO and chief commercial and development officer said: “Satellite technology is a natural ally for DTT roll-out in the countries targeted by our partner, as the reach we deliver can feed terrestrial networks spread over a huge landmass.”“This contract with Canal+ Overseas also cements a longstanding partnership with Canal+ with whom we have been collaborating in Poland and French overseas territories for over 20 years.”last_img read more