Half-time: Chelsea 0 Liverpool 0 (Agg: 1-1)

first_imgChelsea were twice denied a penalty during a frenetic start to the Capital One Cup semi-final second leg at Stamford Bridge.With the tie finely poised after a 1-1 draw at Anfield in the first leg, they looked menacing from the first whistle and might have been awarded a penalty in the opening five minutes.Diego Costa got the better of Mamadou Sakho on the right-hand side and picked out Willian, whose shot was blocked by Lucas with the ball hitting the Liverpool man’s hand as he threw himself in the way.At the other end, Raheem Sterling scampered towards goal after Kurt Zouma had misjudged a long ball, but the centre-back recovered to tackle him after Sterling had gone past Chelsea skipper John Terry.The hosts were soon back on the attack and Costa appeared to be fouled in the box by Martin Skrtel, but again referee Michael Oliver ignored appeals for a spot-kick.With Terry back in the side after being rested for Saturday’s FA Cup debacle against Bradford, Blues boss Jose Mourinho made a bold decision by retaining youngster Zouma and instead dropping Gary Cahill to the bench.And Chelsea have been caused some problems at the back, twice relying on keeper Thibaut Courtois to prevent Liverpool going ahead.The Belgian saved superbly from Alberto Moreno following a clever pass from Steven Gerrard.Soon afterwards Courtois was called into action again, this time saving with his legs to keep out an effort from Philippe Coutinho, who showed great skill to get himself into a shooting position but ought to have then scored.Eden Hazard’s away goal means a 0-0 draw would take Chelsea to Wembley to face Tottenham or Sheffield United in the final – but only if that were to remain the scoreline after extra time.Chelsea: Courtois; Ivanovic, Zouma, Terry, Filipe Luis; Matic, Fabregas; Willian, Oscar, Hazard; Costa. Subs: Cech, Azpilicueta, Cahill, Ake, Ramires, Remy, Drogba.Follow West London Sport on TwitterFind us on Facebooklast_img read more

Gift of the Givers: 25 years of philanthropy: Dr YM Essack: medical co-ordinator

first_imgSouth Africa is a unique and amazing nation; the spirit of ubuntu lives in us. In a series of five articles, we share stories from Gift of the Givers volunteers in their own words as the organisation marks its 25th year of serving humanity. In this article, the first of five, we chat to medical co-ordinator, Dr YM Essack to find out more about his role. Dr Essack, with spectacles, with Dr Sooliman. (Image: Gift of the Givers)Sulaiman PhilipSouth African humantarian organisation Gift of the Givers is celebrating 25 years of philanthropy this year. In that time, the largest African organisation of its kind has brought aid and comfort to people in need in 43 countries.The group, founded and led by Dr Imtiaaz Sooliman, has helped to deliver water to drought stricken areas of South Africa and fed refugees in Somalia. It has ongoing feeding programmes in South Africa, humanitarian missions in war-torn Syria and has helped to free South African hostages in Yemen and Mali.Dr Sooliman has built an organisation that lives the very African spirit of ubuntu. He has done so in the company of a group of dedicated volunteers. We spoke to a small selection of them, and will share their stories in a series of articles. From medical staff to logistics, we find out more about Gift of the Givers through its volunteers.In this first of five articles, medical co-ordinator, Dr YM Essack, tells us more about the missions he has been on.Dr YM Essack, the Gift of the Givers medical co-ordinator, has worked with the organisation since 1993. (Image: Gift of the GIvers)Dr YM Essack: medical co-ordinatorI remember, we were in Dharkoush [Syria] when a child, ten or 11, was brought to us after being shot. He had been accidentally shot by his father who was cleaning his gun. The boy’s father stood at the foot of the bed weeping and caressing his son’s feet as our trauma team tried to save his life. The father kept asking in Arabic, “Is he alive?” We could not save his life.Countless emotions ran through the entire ward. We all felt so numb as he broke down. Outside the mother was beyond consoling. What a fruitless and senseless war. All those civilians caught in the quagmire, armed with weapons they don’t know how to use to defend themselves.I have been the Gift of the Givers’ medical co-ordinator over many missions and, in spite of my theoretical knowledge, the reality on the ground is the great leveller. There is always the stark reminder that there exists a need that can never be completely fulfilled. There is, at times, for me this hollow feeling that my presence is not going to change a situation.But for recipients of the aid we bring and the medical assistance that we supply, people often in the most hopeless situations, we are a reminder that humanity still exists at a universal level. That connection between us makes us family.I don’t like talking about myself, but I have a family and I have my own private practice. Everyone knows  that I will drop everything else when the call comes. They understand that I have made a commitment to Gift of the Givers. They know that I believe in its mission and that the “Best among people are those who benefit mankind”.Our motivation, the belief that Dr Sooliman lives by, has a deep spiritual base that ensures unbiased, fair and well thought-out service across racial, religious and geographic barriers. The scope of aid provided is mind-boggling, from material through to medical and psycho-social needs. The emphasis is always, as Dr Sooliman says, to do God’s work as his agents on this Earth.I first met Dr Sooliman in Mozambique in 1991. I was working at a mobile clinic offering primary health care and he was involved with a relief programme. It was clear from the beginning that there was a synergy between us. We both shared the view that service to the Almighty was achieved through serving the needs of humanity at individual, community, national and global level.When Dr Sooliman began developing the Mobile Containerised Hospital I offered my assitance. I was present [in 1993] when the hospital was shipped from the shores of Durban to Bosnia and Herzegovina. My responsibilities have grown over the many missions I have been involved in.I am the medical co-ordinator; my responsibilities encompass preparation and readiness for whatever may be required on a mission. I need to assess the personnel needs, procure equipment, medicines and consumables. I network with specific teams whether they are orthopaedic, surgical or anaesthetia. I am a part of a core team involved with logistics and that deployment fits the context on the ground. With 27 years of family medicine experience, I am able to work as a doctor when required.As important, I provide support to Dr Sooliman with team members. This involves ensuring team harmony, allocation of human and material resources and help with the psychological well being of volunteers.Dr Essack believes in the importance of the work he does with Gift of the Givers despite feeling at times that it won’t change the situation on the ground. (Image: Gift of the Givers)Read the next profile on beekeeper, Owen Willams.Emily Thomas, who works in logitistics at Gift of the Givers shares her story.Ahmed Bham is the head of search and rescue. Read his story here.Dr Livan Meneses-Turino describes Gift of the Givers as a family. Click here to find out more about what he has done with the organisation.Would you like to use this article in your publication or on your website? See Using Brand South Africa material.last_img read more

Five tips to reduce spray drift

first_imgShare Facebook Twitter Google + LinkedIn Pinterest Due to concerns for production costs, safety, and the environment, it is important to maximize the pesticide deposit on the target. One of the major problems challenging pesticide applicators is spray drift, which is defined as movement of pesticides by wind from the application site to an off-target site. Spray drift accounts for about half of all non-compliance cases investigated by the Ohio Department of Agriculture. Spray drift not only result in wasting expensive pesticides and pollution of the environment, it may damage non-target crops nearby, and poses a serious health risk to people living in areas where drift is occurring.Although complete elimination of spray drift is impossible, problems can be reduced significantly if you are aware of major factors that influence drift and take precautions to minimize their influence on off-target movement of droplets. The factors that play a role in either the creation, or reduction of spray drift are: a) Spray characteristics, such as volatility and viscosity of pesticide formulation; b) Equipment and application techniques used for spraying pesticides; c) Weather conditions at the time of application (wind speed and direction, temperature, relative humidity and stability of air around the application site); and most importantly, d) Operator care, attitude, and skill. Here are five cost-effective tips to vegetable producers on how to minimize spray drift. 1. If you can, keep your nozzles as close to the target as possible while still producing a uniform distribution of spray on the target. This doesn’t cost any money as long as it is practical to make it happen.2. When you’re ready to change nozzles, consider selecting nozzles that produce much fewer of the extremely small droplets that are most likely to drift away. Low-drift nozzles are in the market and do a tremendous job of eliminating extremely small, drift-prone droplets from the droplet spectrum.3. There are chemicals sold in the market that are designed to increase the droplet size, and reduce the number of very small droplets when added into the spray mixture. Most of them are some sort of polymer that tends to increase the viscosity and density of the spray mixture which leads to larger droplets. This, however, should be the last defense against drift. First consider the other option such as better targeting of the spray and switching to low-drift nozzles.4. Use shields that cover partially or fully the distance between the target and the nozzles. There are companies manufacturing and selling such attachments to the boom. Shields prevent small droplets from moving away from the immediate application area. This, however, may not be practical for sprayers with extremely large booms.5. If there any any doubts about a spraying job that might result in drift, wait until there is no longer that element of doubt. Always pay attention to wind direction and magnitude. The best investment you can make is to buy a wind meter that tells you how high the wind velocity is at any given time. Having a wind meter handy will help you avoid a costly problem associated with spray drift.More detailed discussion on these tips and other drift reduction strategies are outlined in following OSUE Extension Fact Sheets available online:FABE-525 (http://ohioline.osu.edu/factsheet/fabe-525),FABE- 523 (http://ohioline.osu.edu/factsheet/fabe-523), andFABE 524 (http://ohioline.osu.edu/factsheet/fabe-524). Erdal Ozkan, Professor and Extension agricultural engineer, can be reached at 614-292-3006, or ozkan.2@osu.edu. This column is provided by the OSU Department of Food, Agricultural and Biological Engineering, OSU Extension, Ohio Agricultural Research & Development Center, and the College of Food, Agricultural and Environmental Sciences.last_img read more

Creative Inspiration: Learning from Filmmaking Masters

first_imgIf you’re creative and technical – you’re unstoppable.– Robert RodriguezIn this ‘original and best’ (hence the VHS quality!) 10 minute filmschool, director Robert Rodriguez outlines his philosophy for making movies, especially your first films. The less stuff you have the better, the worse your equipment the better, the less money you have the better, the more mistakes you make the better and oh, make sure you throw away your tripod.Martin Scorcese on Reading The Language of CinemaIn this Jefferson lecture from the National Endownment for the Humanities director Martin Scorcese delivers a lecture entitled ‘The Persistence of Vision: Reading the Language of Cinema‘. Its a great ode to the magic and power of cinema and it’s lasting legacy in the lives and imagination of those who love it as much as Scorcese does. An inspiring hour with a master filmmaker.You can watch the full lecture here.Masters on CinematographyIn this fantastic two part interview from The Craft Truck – Gordon Willis talks about his career, the craft, shooting The Godfather and much more. Gordon Willis was director of photography on The Godfather Trilogy, Annie Hall, Manhattan and many other great movies. A great lesson in cinema. All filmmakers are students of the craft. Discover these valuable lessons from filmmaking legends. Master’s on Film EditingOrson Welles packs plenty of food for thought into under two short minutes in this clip on the craft of film editing. Watching it will make you proud to be an editor! Double dose of Hitchcock: For a more robust analysis of what editing really is, you can’t do much better than these 7 minutes from the master filmmaker.last_img read more

Final Cut Pro X Video Tutorial: Compound Clips for Music

first_imgWorking with music in FCPX? In this exclusive Final Cut Pro X video tutorial we share a trick for quickly replacing temp tracks with final versions.Often editors will cut up a single piece of temp music into different parts to create their own custom edit of the track. When using production music (like tracks from Premiumbeat.com) you can use temp (watermarked) versions of the tracks in your project to try out before licensing a high resolution version. So, if you’re working in Final Cut Pro X you may be wondering what the easiest way to swap these temp track for a final version – so that it replaces every instance of the track in your timeline.In the following video tutorial we show you how using compound clips in FCPX is an easy way to swap out any track:When cutting a piece of music into your FCPX timeline there is TWO things you will want to do first:Place the cut of music in a secondary storyline(using the shortcut Command + G)Make the cut of music a compound clip(using the shortcut Option + G)Then, when you’ve decided to use the track for your project, swap it out in FCPX with the temp by opening up the compound clip, overlaying the full/final version and mute the temp version. It’s as simple as that. The compound clip is the key to swapping out the temp music for the full resolution track.Got more Final Cut Pro X tips to share or questions about this tutorial? Let us know in the comments below.last_img read more

Minister, ex-MLAs listed as ‘Modicare’ beneficiaries

first_imgAn Uttar Pradesh Minister, some former MLAs and prominent businessmen here figure in the list of beneficiaries of Ayushman Bharat, the Centre’s recently launched health insurance scheme meant for the poor and the deprived, officials said. Among the unintended beneficiaries of the recently launched Ayushman Bharat-Pradhan Mantri Jan Arogya Yojana is the State’s Industrial Development Minister Satish Mahana.Probe ordered Mr. Mahana has asked for a probe into the anomaly. The ambitious scheme is expected to provide health insurance cover of ₹5 lakh to about five crore people across the country. “I came to know from some reliable sources that my name and my family members’ names were on the Ayushman Bharat-National Health Protection Scheme website,” he said. The Minister said he then asked the Kanpur District Magistrate to conduct an inquiry and take strict action against those found guilty. Chief Medical Officer Ashok Shukla said the list also has the names of former BJP MLA Salil Vishnoi, former Congress MLA Ajay Kapoor and his brothers Vijay Kapoor and Sanjay Kapoor.Two lakh families Over two lakh families in Kanpur district are listed as beneficiaries under the Ayushman Bharat scheme.last_img read more

BANGLADESH ELECT TO FIELD AGAINST INDIA IN WORLD CUP OPENER

first_imgBangaldesh won the toss and elected to field against India in the World Cup 2011 opener on Saturday at Sher-e-Bangla National Stadium in Mirpur.Sreesanth to play in place of Ashish Nehra, who was ruled due to back injurylast_img

Is your nonprofit website open for business?

first_imgIs your nonprofit website sending the right message to potential donors? Year-end fundraising season will be here before you know it. Now is the time to clear away the cobwebs and roll out the welcome mat for prospective donors, volunteers, and those who may benefit from your work. If you haven’t updated your site in a while, you might give donors the impression that your organization is no longer active.Worried your site may say “move along” instead of “come on in”? Here are the top issues that can scare visitors away from your nonprofit website (and how to fix them).Broken linksThey’re not just aggravating and confusing for your website visitors, broken links can also be a big red flag for search engines like Google. Having internal links that don’t work or that don’t point to real content can affect how your site shows up in search.How to fix it: Most website platforms and content management systems have reporting that will show you the top pages that are returning an error. Taking a close look at your Google Analytics can help as well. Do some internal testing on your website to make sure all of your links are taking visitors where they should. Stale content Do you still have information about your “upcoming event” on your home page even though the “upcoming event” took place several months ago? Is the last post on your nonprofit’s blog from 2012? This is a surefire sign that no one in your organization is actually looking at your website. To your visitors, it says: we gave up.How to fix it: Make it someone’s responsibility to frequently review your website and do regular housekeeping. If you have a news feed or blog that shows up on your home page, make sure you’re adding new content frequently. If you don’t have a plan to add new items, remove these feeds from your pages. Dated designThis one is somewhat subjective, but there are certain hallmarks of an outdated web design: crazy animations, hard to read text (usually light text on dark background, or a veritable rainbow of font colors), randomly-placed images, to name a few. Geocities is dead. It’s time for your nonprofit website to move on to better things.How to fix it: A complete makeover would be nice, but if that’s not in the cards, focus on fixing the most egregious cosmetic issues within your current design and platform. Start with your key pages and branch out from there. Make it easy to read and remove anything that makes your site look like this. No contact informationThe lights may be on, but without obvious and current contact information, is anyone really home? Your contact details give people an easy way to ask questions and find out more, plus openly listing this information on your website is a sign of trust and transparency. How to fix it: Add your physical address, phone number, and a way to email you to the footer of your website. Place clear links to your “Contact Us” page within your site’s global navigation. No clear way to donateThis is the first thing I look for when I am asked to review an organization’s website, and it’s amazing how many nonprofits still don’t have a prominently placed donation button on every page of their website. Without a clear and highly visible way to donate, you’re effectively telling donors: we don’t need your money. How to fix it: Make your donate button big, bold, and above the fold of your website. Make sure your donate button actually says “Donate Now”, “Donate”, or “Give”. Fuzzy language won’t cut it here. Slow to loadOne Mississippi, two Mississippi … by three Mississippi your website better be finished loading, or most visitors will simply leave. It may not be fair, but people are impatient. They have better things to do than to wait for your carousel of images or Flash presentation to load. How to fix it: Start by confirming there are no technical problems with your website’s platform or hosting service. Then, take a hard look at your website’s key pages and see how you can streamline them by removing extraneous images, code, or other files that are bogging down your site. A reputable web developer can also provide suggestions for other improvements that can speed up your site. (Bonus: Decluttering your site will have a positive effect on potential donors, making it easy for them to figure out what it is you do and why they should care.) Not mobile friendlyWhen your nonprofit website is difficult to load (or completely dead) on a mobile device, you may as well not exist for that smartphone user. 56% of US adults are smartphone users, and they’re becoming more and more likely to read your emails and social media outreach on a mobile device. If your links take them to a site that’s non-functional on their phone, you’ve missed out on another opportunity to connect.How to fix it: You don’t need a complete overhaul to make your website more mobile friendly. Focus on a handful of key pages (think: home page, donation page, contact page, any other pages you point to regularly from emails or social media) and improve them with these 8 tips for making your nonprofit website mobile friendly. (Bonus: Most mobile-friendly website tweaks will improve usability overall.)What are your biggest website challenges? Have you made a recent change to your site that’s made a big difference? Chime in with your thoughts in the comments below.last_img read more

No Kitties or Puppies. HELP! (Step Two)

first_imgReview Step One In Step One of this two-part post, I shared my take on why this type of emotional candy works so well to raise money or recruit volunteers. I cited a reliable litmus test for photo impact—would you share it with your own family and friends, and would they “like” or share it? Here are some recommendations, with examples: For policy and intermediary organizations: Connect the dots between your work and the people who are the ultimate beneficiaries. If your organization is not an animal rescue or somehow directly related to puppies, kitties, or babies, these alternatives will be far more effective in helping you forge connections and motivate giving. Most important, they are authentic, relevant expressions, rather than manipulative clickbait. Organizations like yours have it even harder when building relationships and motivating action, be it giving or something else. That’s because your work is indirect. For all causes and organizations: Highlight the similarities between your audiences and your organization’s clients, participants, or beneficiaries. Get detailed and personal in words and/or photos. The close-up (bottom left) of the little girl focused on drawing is compelling! Clearly, we never want anyone to be homeless, much less our own family. The cause has the potential to scare off supporters because of their fear that it could happen to them. Stigma! However, by photographing an older resident (like your grandma or mine) reading to a couple of kids, Hope House busts through and connects us with the residents in a positive way. (I remember when my grandma read to me.) The Findlay-Hancock County Community Foundation does a great job of this on its Facebook page, as shown in the post above. Here, the foundation makes it easy to make the connection between its work and the individuals who benefit from its grants for a real “aha!” moment.center_img The details are what sticks (or doesn’t) and make your story memorable and more likely to be shared. How do you make your organization’s content compelling—beyond kitties, puppies, or babies? Please share your recommendations in the comments! You’re working on legislation related to a cause or supporting other cause organizations. This makes it challenging for prospects to connect emotionally. It takes your audience time and thought to make the connection between your impact and people, which is always a deterrent. Findlay Hope House does a great job of this on its Facebook page time and time again. Consider the post above, showing kids without homes living in Hope House’s transitional housing. But there is a great method of speeding that vital connection—make the message for your prospects and supporters. Connect the dots between your organization’s work and impact and your ultimate beneficiaries, even if there are layers in between. Okay, your organization is one of many that can’t use kitty or puppy photos to raise money or recruit volunteers. So what can you do to quickly and effectively connect with the emotions of prospects and supporters? Step 2: Make emotional connections and compelling content—if not candy—even without the supercute. Review Step One With refreshing practicality, Nancy Schwartz rolls up her sleeves to help nonprofits develop and implement strategies to build strong relationships that inspire key supporters to action. She shares her deep nonprofit marketing insights—and passion—through consulting, speaking, and her popular blog and e-news at GettingAttention.org.last_img read more