How to Make the Case for Social Media

first_img Remember: This isn’t a crusade, it’s a learning experience for everyone. Make sure there IS a good case for your initiative and if it does fail, share and learn from what went wrong. There is no shame in gaining knowledge from mistakes – for you, or your boss. 1. Change the subject. If you’re having a debate over the value of social media, you’re having the wrong discussion. The discussion should be about your organization’s goals – with social media being the means, not the end. 2. Make it about what your boss already wants. Don’t position your idea as a social media initiative; frame it as your initiative to support your boss’s goals, in your boss’s language. Is donor retention a big concern for your Executive Director? Highlight how social media can help keep donors engaged. Does your board want more success stories to showcase? Underscore how social media can help make that happen. 3. Make it about the audience. A good way to depersonalize the debate over social media is to make it about your target audience’s preferences rather than a philosophical tug of war between you and said boss. 4. Sign your boss up to listen.Set up Google Alerts and TweetBeep (email alerts for Twitter mentions) for your boss, so she or he can see that there are already many discussions about your organization happening online. Once this apparent, two things are likely to happen. First, it will become clear that your organization no longer controls your message online – so worrying about social media causing a lack of control is not worth fearing. That day is already here. Second, it will be hard not to want to join those conversations online – which is what social engagement is all about. 5. Set some ground rules. Set a social media policy for your organization, so it’s clear how to respond to what you’re hearing – and what types of initiatives have internal support. 6. Start small. If you’re going to start a social media initiative, start small. Pinpoint where your supporters are and branch out from there. You don’t have to be an overnight social media expert – you just need to be a part of the conversations about your cause. 7. Set a clear goal.Just as with any other marketing effort, establish a specific, measurable goal so you can identify success. 8. Measure and report.Once you’ve identified your approach and have set a goal, ensure that you can track and measure your progress. Most social media platforms have built-in analytics and you can also track Web traffic back to your site through Google Analytics. Be sure to tie your results back to your social media efforts where possible with careful tracking. (This could mean using tracking codes on your donation pages, Google campaign tags or landing pages created specifically for your social media outreach.) Share every little bit of progress and give your boss credit for it! It’s clear that social media is an effective channel for establishing your nonprofit’s brand identity, championing your cause and engaging with current and would-be supporters. So, how do you make sure your organization is on board — especially your boss, executive director or board members? Here are eight tips for making the case for your next social media initiative: center_img Photo Source: Big Stock Photo Adapted from Nonprofit Marketing Blog.last_img read more

Hey Girl, I See What Your Nonprofit Is Doing

first_imgBy tapping into the #tigerblood hashtag, Zachary reported that tons of media outlets picked up on the story, resulting in a modest increase in blood donations.So what’s in it for you? Why should you consider making a meme? 1. Sure, memes can be just plain silly and fun, and but they can also humanize your nonprofit’s public image. Who doesn’t love an organization that embraces its humanity and sense of humor? 2. Memes can create connections and start conversations because of their two-prong premise: A meme is based on an aspect of popular culture and spread from person to person. 3. Memes give supporters an easy way to publicize and promote your cause. Once you create a meme, fans can quickly share it over email, social media, and their own websites.Want to create your own nonprofit meme to help build buzz for your cause? Check out our tips on using memes to spread your nonprofit’s message. (Image credit: National Wildlife Federation, Source: Avi Kaplan) You’ve seen them all over Facebook, YouTube, Tumblr, and Pinterest: grumpycats,talking babies, even Ryan Gosling. Entertaining memes have exploded across the Internet. But have you also noticed an uptick in charitable memes, memes that are doing good? Many nonprofits are capitalizing on the popularity of memes to gain visibility and connect with new supporters.Nonprofits aren’t always great at piggybacking on the work of others, but that’s the key for a meme to take off. Senior Strategist Avi Kaplan of RAD Campaign has compiled some tip-top examples of nonprofit memes that worked because they borrowed a cultural phenomena, as did tech writer Zachary Sniderman.One of the best examples of nonprofit meme-jacking came from a 132-year-old organization, the American Red Cross. Capitalizing on Charlie Sheen’s 2011 outburst and proclamation to have drank tiger’s blood, the American Red Cross tweeted:We may not collect #tigerblood, but we know our donors & volunteers have fierce passion for doing good! #RedCrossMonth— American Red Cross (@RedCross)last_img read more

Is your nonprofit website open for business?

first_imgIs your nonprofit website sending the right message to potential donors? Year-end fundraising season will be here before you know it. Now is the time to clear away the cobwebs and roll out the welcome mat for prospective donors, volunteers, and those who may benefit from your work. If you haven’t updated your site in a while, you might give donors the impression that your organization is no longer active.Worried your site may say “move along” instead of “come on in”? Here are the top issues that can scare visitors away from your nonprofit website (and how to fix them).Broken linksThey’re not just aggravating and confusing for your website visitors, broken links can also be a big red flag for search engines like Google. Having internal links that don’t work or that don’t point to real content can affect how your site shows up in search.How to fix it: Most website platforms and content management systems have reporting that will show you the top pages that are returning an error. Taking a close look at your Google Analytics can help as well. Do some internal testing on your website to make sure all of your links are taking visitors where they should. Stale content Do you still have information about your “upcoming event” on your home page even though the “upcoming event” took place several months ago? Is the last post on your nonprofit’s blog from 2012? This is a surefire sign that no one in your organization is actually looking at your website. To your visitors, it says: we gave up.How to fix it: Make it someone’s responsibility to frequently review your website and do regular housekeeping. If you have a news feed or blog that shows up on your home page, make sure you’re adding new content frequently. If you don’t have a plan to add new items, remove these feeds from your pages. Dated designThis one is somewhat subjective, but there are certain hallmarks of an outdated web design: crazy animations, hard to read text (usually light text on dark background, or a veritable rainbow of font colors), randomly-placed images, to name a few. Geocities is dead. It’s time for your nonprofit website to move on to better things.How to fix it: A complete makeover would be nice, but if that’s not in the cards, focus on fixing the most egregious cosmetic issues within your current design and platform. Start with your key pages and branch out from there. Make it easy to read and remove anything that makes your site look like this. No contact informationThe lights may be on, but without obvious and current contact information, is anyone really home? Your contact details give people an easy way to ask questions and find out more, plus openly listing this information on your website is a sign of trust and transparency. How to fix it: Add your physical address, phone number, and a way to email you to the footer of your website. Place clear links to your “Contact Us” page within your site’s global navigation. No clear way to donateThis is the first thing I look for when I am asked to review an organization’s website, and it’s amazing how many nonprofits still don’t have a prominently placed donation button on every page of their website. Without a clear and highly visible way to donate, you’re effectively telling donors: we don’t need your money. How to fix it: Make your donate button big, bold, and above the fold of your website. Make sure your donate button actually says “Donate Now”, “Donate”, or “Give”. Fuzzy language won’t cut it here. Slow to loadOne Mississippi, two Mississippi … by three Mississippi your website better be finished loading, or most visitors will simply leave. It may not be fair, but people are impatient. They have better things to do than to wait for your carousel of images or Flash presentation to load. How to fix it: Start by confirming there are no technical problems with your website’s platform or hosting service. Then, take a hard look at your website’s key pages and see how you can streamline them by removing extraneous images, code, or other files that are bogging down your site. A reputable web developer can also provide suggestions for other improvements that can speed up your site. (Bonus: Decluttering your site will have a positive effect on potential donors, making it easy for them to figure out what it is you do and why they should care.) Not mobile friendlyWhen your nonprofit website is difficult to load (or completely dead) on a mobile device, you may as well not exist for that smartphone user. 56% of US adults are smartphone users, and they’re becoming more and more likely to read your emails and social media outreach on a mobile device. If your links take them to a site that’s non-functional on their phone, you’ve missed out on another opportunity to connect.How to fix it: You don’t need a complete overhaul to make your website more mobile friendly. Focus on a handful of key pages (think: home page, donation page, contact page, any other pages you point to regularly from emails or social media) and improve them with these 8 tips for making your nonprofit website mobile friendly. (Bonus: Most mobile-friendly website tweaks will improve usability overall.)What are your biggest website challenges? Have you made a recent change to your site that’s made a big difference? Chime in with your thoughts in the comments below.last_img read more

A New Look for Network for Good

first_imgThis is a blog post I’ve been looking forward to writing for some time now.Today I’m pleased to share the launch of our redesigned Network for Good website featuring a fresh new look that highlights our best resources and pulls them into one central location. You can now visit www.networkforgood.com to access (and search) all of our content, including our webinars, guides and templates, The Nonprofit Marketing Blog, and Fundraising 123 articles. You can also find updated information on Network for Good’s fundraising products and services and learn how to improve your strategy for connecting with individual donors.A big thanks to the amazing team here at Network for Good, who imagined, designed, built, and launched the site in record time. Our appreciation also goes out to our many advisors and testers (including our customers, partners, readers, and sector experts) who helped us refine our approach over the last several weeks.We’re excited about our new site, and we hope you find it easier to navigate and more useful than ever. I’d love to hear what you think—drop me a line and let me know your questions and feedback.last_img read more

Action on HIV and Maternal Health is Needed in Sub-Saharan Africa to End Preventable Maternal Mortality and Achieve an AIDS-Free Generation

first_imgPosted on December 1, 2013November 27, 2017By: Tamil Kendall, PhD, Postdoctoral Research Fellow, Women and Health InitiativeClick to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to email this to a friend (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window)Globally, HIV and complications of childbearing are the leading causes of death among women of reproductive age. The epicenter of poor maternal health outcomes associated with HIV is sub-Saharan Africa, where 90% of pregnant women living with HIV reside. In this region, women with HIV are six to eight times more likely to die during pregnancy and the postpartum period than HIV-negative women, approximately a quarter of maternal deaths are due to HIV, and WHO estimates that maternal mortality has actually increased in eight countries with high HIV prevalence over the past 20 years. Addressing the intersections between HIV and maternal health in sub-Saharan Africa is necessary to make good on international and country commitments to end preventable maternal mortality and achieve an AIDS-free generation.Fortunately, we know what some of the problems are and how to address them:In 2012, only 49% of pregnant African women were tested for HIV—scaling-up voluntary HIV counseling and testing to reach 90% of women attending prenatal care is needed to support women to access treatment for their own health and to prevent mother-to-child transmission of HIV. African countries like Botswana, Mozambique, South Africa and Zambia have shown it can be done.To achieve better outcomes coverage of interventions that can radically reduce maternal and neonatal mortality, such as provision of antiretroviral therapy (ART), malaria and tuberculosis screening and treatment, and family planning must increase through better integration of HIV and Maternal-Child Health (MCH) services.Too many pregnant and postpartum women either do not begin or drop out of HIV and MCH services. HIV stigma, disrespect and abuse, gender discrimination, and financial and geographic barriers are associated with low uptake and retention in care and treatment. Social support for pregnant and postpartum women and community mobilization to promote women’s health and rights can contribute to increased demand for and delivery of high-quality, respectful HIV and MCH services.Addressing maternal morbidity and mortality among women living with HIV and improving outcomes for all pregnant and postpartum women requires health system strengthening, integration of HIV and MCH services, and transformation of the social context.Research and evaluation is needed for better policy and programs. The forthcoming Research and Evaluation Agenda for Maternal Health and HIV in sub-Saharan Africa identifies three priorities:Clinical Questions about Maternal Mortality and HIV: What is the relationship between HIV infection and rates and causes of maternal morbidity and mortality? How can increased illness and death among women with HIV be prevented? How will new treatment guidelines and increased availability of ART for women living with HIV effect maternal and neonatal health outcomes?Integrating Health Service Delivery to Address Maternal Health and HIV: What are the most effective models for integrating HIV testing, treatment and care with antenatal, intrapartum, postpartum and family planning services? How can additional critical interventions—specifically screening and treatment for malaria and tuberculosis, postpartum family planning, and preconception counseling—be integrated into the continuum of HIV and MCH services while maintaining quality? What levels of staffing and mix of skills are needed to safely and effectively deliver integrated services?  How does service integration effect coverage, quality, retention and satisfaction of users and providers, and health outcomes?Transforming the Social Context to Improve Maternal Health: What are the effects of programs which reduce HIV-related stigma and discrimination, disrespect and abuse in maternity care, and violence against women on uptake and retention in HIV and MCH services, adherence to antiretroviral treatment, disclosure of HIV status, and postpartum depression? How does increasing social support for pregnant and postpartum women and community mobilization to promote respectful, high-quality HIV and MCH services, effect maternal health outcomes?The 2013 World AIDS Day theme “Shared Responsibility: Strengthening Results for an AIDS-Free Generation” is a call for researchers, policymakers, healthcare providers and women living with HIV and their communities to redouble efforts to improve responses to HIV and maternal and child health in sub-Saharan Africa.Read the policy brief or visit the MHTF topic page on Maternal Health, HIV and AIDS for more resources.Share this: ShareEmailPrint To learn more, read:last_img read more

4 Fundraising Ideas to Develop Your Fundraising Plan

first_img“A goal without a plan is just a wish.” ― Antoine de Saint-ExupéryEmbarking on a new year—whether it’s a calendar or fiscal year (or both!)—is always an opportunity for a fresh start.  After all, that’s why resolutions are written at the start of a new year.  New year. New goals.  It’s the same with writing a development plan for your nonprofit, which you can think of as a business plan for fundraising. It helps you develop the discipline of looking at what you’ve done well and where you need to improve, setting your sights for the year ahead, and mapping out what you will do to reach your goals. Simply put, it translates your wishes to goals.Let’s pause for a moment to think about the 30,000-foot view. Fundraising is not just about raising money. The core of our work as fundraisers is as relationship architects between our organizations and the donors who currently or, we hope will eventually, support us. Our goal is to create two-way conversations that are not transactional or circular exchanges of asking and receiving money. We know this isn’t sustainable in the long-term. A development plan is more than just a set of lists, calendars, and activities.  It’s a strategic compilation of all the ways you can connect and communicate with your donors which, if done effectively, leads to increased revenue. It’s a competitive market out there. There are 1.8 million nonprofits in the US with about 75,000 new ones registering with the IRS each year. If you feel like the room is getting crowded, so do our donors. What makes the difference to them is if they feel valued by you and connected to your organization. If not, they’ll go somewhere else to give.So, your development plan should focus on four key areas:1. Balancing your portfolio:If your funding generally comes from one source more than others, it’s time to think about how to rebalance things. This might mean looking at how to welcome more individual donors instead of relying primarily on foundations and/or corporations. It could also mean thinking about others ways to build donor relationships besides the one major gala or one major direct mail appeal you do each year. Putting all your eggs in the proverbial basket is not sustainable.2. Setting the stage for major gifts:Every organization no matter how small can, and should, be raising major gifts. A successful major gifts program does not focus on high net-worth individuals with no connection to your organization. In fact, you probably already know who your major (current and potential) donors are. Your next major gift will likely come from one of these donors who has the capacity and who has been supporting you for a long time (and not at particularly high levels) and may also have been involved as a volunteer. Carving out a little time for more personal interactions with these donors will help you qualify those who can make larger gifts down the road.3. Creating greater donor engagement:It’s easy to become complacent and think that just because donors have chosen to invest in our cause, they will unconditionally support us and that when we ask again they will give. Nonprofits on average lose more than 60% of their donors each year because they haven’t figured out the right way to connect with their donors. Good donor engagement involves a regular calendar of touchpoints, updates, and communications that highlights stories of successes, progress, results, and even failures and challenges. Donors want to see, feel, and touch the impact their gifts are having. They want a donor relationship and an exceptional donor experience. You are most likely already doing it without defining these activities in that way: annual reports, newsletters, special webinars hosted by your key program leadership, holiday and birthday cards are all examples of ways to leverage communications to enhance your relationships with your donors.4. Laying the foundation for tomorrow:Without question, your limited bandwidth should be focused on donor retention because once you lose the donors who already opted to give to you, it’s hard to get them back. That said, it is still important to plant the seeds for the next pipeline of donors to your organization. The best potential new donor names are people who self-identify in some way or who are connected in some way to you. Perhaps it’s through a sign-up on your website, following you on social media, attendance at an event, or a visitor book if prospective donors can visit your facilities. This is also a way board members and other volunteers can play a key role in introducing your organization to their networks.  Every follower, volunteer, and the new name that crosses your doorway should be considered a potential investor in your work. Welcome them.For more thoughts on how to propel your nonprofit forward, download our free Fundraising Plan eGuide or hire Network for Good personal fundraising coach to Building Stronger Donor Engagement and Raising More Money, as we explore this topic in greater detail.last_img read more

NFG Staff Profile: AJ Johnson

first_imgThe idea of being able to help someone attracts AJ to nonprofits. From an early age, she was involved with a Golden Retriever rescue organization and co-founded a satellite rescue facility. Working remote in Florida, you’ll find AJ at one of the awesome parks in Orlando, FL on her days off!“Nothing brings a smile to my face more than when I watch our customers have that “a-ha” moment in real time.”Q&A with AJ Johnson, Customer Success ManagerWhat do you do at Network for Good?I currently work as a Customer Success Specialist on the Welcome Team! I like to tell my customers that I’m a little bit like a driving instructor – I’m here to help them understand not only their product, but how the different components work together to help boost their fundraising. I get to work with folks for their first few months so that they’ll have a point of contact for their questions, and make sure I can provide them with the resources they’ll need to be successful after my time working with them ends.What is your experience with nonprofit organizations outside of Network for Good?I’ve always been involved with the nonprofit world one way or another. When I first heard about the 9/11 attacks, I immediately asked my parents how we’d be able to help the families who’d lost a loved one. After my family adopted a golden retriever from a small rescue while I was in middle school, we became involved enough to co-found our own rescue, using a network of volunteers, fosters, and transport specialists (#adoptdontshop, always!). I raised money through donations from my Bat Mitzvah for the rescue’s benefit, and I even ran their fledgling social media accounts for a while in high school! My passion has always been with the LGBTQ+ community, though, and I have volunteered with various queer organizations (and I do, to this day!). My focus has always been making sure people across the gender spectrum have access to safe, comfortable, and affordable medical care.What attracts you to nonprofits? I just love the concept of being able to do everything in your power to help someone. I’ve found motivation in helping those who maybe don’t even realize that they might need help, and I’ve found motivation in giving voices to those who maybe don’t have the capability to speak up. It’s that motivation that moves me to incorporate service in all parts of my life – work, play, and everything in between.What do you enjoy most about your work? Nothing brings a smile to my face more than when I watch our customers have that “aha!” moment when I’m on the phone with them. When everything clicks together for them, in that moment, it’s easy to see their excitement grow – they often are realizing exactly how they’ll be able to use the system to reach more donors with their message. Nonprofits are people’s passions, their hearts and souls, and being able to see it all click as they use their new system is just so fulfilling. I also love the exposure I get to nonprofits and causes that I’d never heard of – there are so many incredible people doing incredible things and it’s inspiring to see the kind of solutions people can find and the real magic they can do.What do you enjoy doing outside work? I live (and work remotely) about 30 miles south of Orlando, and I’m a huge adrenaline junkie, so on my days off, there’s a good chance you’ll find me at one of the theme parks in the area. I’ve got annual passes to Universal, Sea World, and Disney World, but I’ve always been a Disney kid at heart, so sometimes I’ll just go to the parks to grab a Mickey pretzel with cheese and people watch. Universal is great, too, for when I need a little Hogwarts magic to get through the weekend, and you’ll catch me most nights during the fall at their Halloween Horror Nights, hiding behind my partner from all of the scares! Sea World has become a recent favorite, though, because you can actually feed some of the little rays some anchovies, or watch the baby dolphins as they play tag and chase each other in the nursery. No matter which park I’m at, though, I’ll be somewhere near those roller coasters!Lightning RoundDream vacation? A full European adventure. I took Italian in high school and fell in love with the language, the culture, the architecture, the art – but if I’m headed on a dream trip, why only include one stop on the tour?Most recent book read? I’m currently reading Retta’s memoir “So Close to Being the Sh*t, Y’all Don’t Even Know” and I haven’t been able to stop laughing. She’s funny and poignant, and it goes so far beyond her time on Parks and Rec. I love to read though, and I’ve got over a thousand physical books at home – don’t even ask my about my Kindle.Last movie seen in movie theater? The last two have been Aladdin and Toy Story 4 – I wasn’t kidding about being a Disney kid!Theme song? “Don’t Threaten Me With A Good Time” by Panic! At the Disco.Favorite color? Blue!All time favorite athlete? Right now, it’s Coco Gauff – she’s an honest-to-goodness inspiration. At fifteen, she’s competing in Wimbledon against her all-time hero – at fifteen, I think I was working part-time at a water park! She sets such an example for anyone who wants to follow their dreams, as cheesy as it sounds. Read more on The Nonprofit Bloglast_img read more

Use of Chlorhexidine to Save Newborn Lives: Making People Aware Through Mass Media

first_img ShareEmailPrint To learn more, read: Posted on October 17, 2015October 13, 2016By: Leela Khanal, Project Director, Chlorhexidine Navi Care Program,
 JSI Research and Training Institute, Inc.Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to email this to a friend (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window)The Global Maternal Newborn Health Conference holds for us a unique opportunity to come together and think of how to reach the sustainable development goal of ending preventable maternal and newborn deaths. One such way is by preventing neonatal infections using chlorhexidine for umbilical cord care. But just implementing interventions may not be enough; communication to providers and mothers can enhance uptake and effectiveness of these interventions to save lives.JSI’s Chlorhexidine cord care program (CNCP) is supporting the Government of Nepal to scale up the use of chlorhexidine for umbilical cord care. Chlorhexidine is applied on the umbilical cord stump immediately after cord cutting for both facility and home born babies. One three-gram chlorhexidine tube is distributed to a pregnant women either during her antenatal visit to a health facility or by her local Female Community Health Volunteer during the 8th month of pregnancy, with proper counseling.To increase awareness among the community people and thus improve demand and good practice, a behavior change communication program has been designed and implemented. The communication initiative, which started in September 2015 and will continue until September 2017, will use a variety of strategies to create demand for chlorhexidine. This social behavior change communication (SBCC) campaign will initiate message dissemination about the value of this low-cost chlorhexidine gel from both national and local radio and television stations.During the first 3 months of the SBCC campaign, messages about chlorhexidine application (both for health facilities and the community births) are being broadcast as public announcements from mainstream television channels. Messages have been placed during prime time news bulletins on Kantipur Television and popular programs on Nepal Television in order to reach a mass audience throughout the country. Radio airings of ad spots have also been placed with stations having a wide listenership; Kantipur FM and Image FM, with a priority given to reaching remote geographies and achieving effective coverage of targeted women, pregnant women, FCHVs and health workers. Branding of chlorhexidine (Navi Malam) has been incorporated into the sponsored radio programs that are very popular in remote locations, ensuring great coverage of messages.Realizing the strength of local and community FM stations in Nepal, JSI has emphasized mobilization of local FM stations in 30 districts during the first phase, to increase access to the chlorhexidine message in remote areas, not covered by national broadcasting. Other implementing partners—Save the Children, One Heart Worldwide, Care Nepal and ADRA—are also supporting the airing of chlorhexidine radio messages from local FM stations in 22 additional districts. JSI will do monitoring of these interventions and evaluate at the end of three months, based on a media monitoring and evaluation plan. Based on results of the monitoring and evaluation the way forward for the remaining period of time will be decided. A detailed broadcasting schedule of Radio and TV spots has been prepared and shared with the partners.Photo: “Testing newborn reflexes” © 2013 Rob Tinworth/Possible, used under a Creative Commons Attribution license: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0/Share this:last_img read more

Jamaican Independence Ball for Manhattan Saturday

first_img This year’s proceeds will provide full scholarships for needy students to attend the University of the West Indies This prestigious event will bring together just over 1,500 Jamaicans and friends of Jamaica Jamaican Ambassador to the United States, His Excellency, Professor Stephen C. Vasciannie will be the guest speaker Story Highlights Jamaica’s independence celebrations in the New York tri-state area will come to a climax on Saturday, August 17, when the Jamaica Independence Celebration Foundation, Inc (JICFI) stages the annual Independence Ball in commemoration of Jamaica’s 51st year of independence.This prestigious event will bring together just over 1,500 Jamaicans and friends of Jamaica at the New York Hilton Hotel in downtown Manhattan, where the island’s colors, and music will be on display.The ball, which is being held under the distinguished patronage of the Consul General of Jamaica to New York, Herman G. LaMont will have as its special guest speaker, Jamaican Ambassador to the United States, His Excellency, Professor Stephen C. Vasciannie.  Noted Jamaican actress Sheryl-Lee Ralph will compere the event.Two distinguished Jamaicans, Heather Foster, Office of Public Engagement at the White House, and orthopedic surgeon Dr. Answorth A. Allen, along with Irie Jam Media, will be honored this year. Patrons to this year’s ball will dance to music provided by the Fabulous Five Band.Speaking at the media launch held at the Jamaican Consulate in New York, Chairperson of the JICFI, Paulette Willoughby said that over the years, proceeds from the ball have been used to support several organisations.Among them are the New York City Rescue Mission, Good Shepherd Foundation, Early Childhood Foundation, Ward Theatre Foundation, Boys’ Town Foundation, Alpha Boys’ House, American Foundation of the University of the West Indies (AFUWI), American Cancer Society, Mission for the Poor and Mustard Seed Communities.Ms. Willoughby informed that this year’s proceeds will provide full scholarships for needy students to attend the University of the West Indies, as well as support for an early childhood institution.The JICFI, a non-profit organisation, dedicated to celebrating Jamaica’s independence, seeks to bring together Jamaicans in the Diaspora to a signature ball, held in New York annually. The gala will showcase Jamaica’s food and culture.Contact: Derrick Scottlast_img read more

Who is the guarantor allowing big bank frauds asks Priyanka

first_imgNew Delhi: Congress leader Priyanka Gandhi Vadra attacked the government on Friday over an RBI report showing bank frauds have gone up by 15 per cent year-on-year in 2018-19, asking who is the guarantor allowing such “big bank frauds”.The number of cases of frauds reported by banks saw a jump of 15 per cent year-on-year basis in 2018-19, with the amount involved increasing by 73.8 per cent in the year, the Reserve Bank of India’s annual report showed. Also Read – Uddhav bats for ‘Sena CM’In FY19, banking sector reported 6,801 frauds involving Rs 71,542.93 crore as against 5,916 cases involving Rs 41,167.04 crore reported in 2017-18. “Country’s biggest banking institution RBI is saying that bank frauds are increasing right under the nose of the government. In 2018-19, this theft has increased,” Priyanka Gandhi said in a tweet in Hindi. “Banks have been duped of Rs 72,000 crore. But, who is the guarantor who is allowing such big bank frauds to occur,” the Congress general secretary asked. Also Read – Farooq demands unconditional release of all detainees in J&KCongress’ chief spokesperson Randeep Surjewala also hit out at the government over the rising number of bank frauds. “‘Loot & Scoot’ in ‘New India’ as a complicit BJP govt looks the other way and common man is taxed!” he said. Congress urges govt to declare financial emergency in countryNew Delhi: The Congress on Friday demanded that a financial emergency be declared in the country and a white paper be released on the “shrinking economy and rising frauds”. Congress spokespersons Jaiveer Shergill and Gaurav Vallabh accused the BJP government of destroying the credibility of the country’s economy and banking system and demanded that it should declare the names of wilful defaulters, along with the details of their non-performing assets (NPAs). “The Congress demands that a financial emergency should be declared in the country,” Shergill told a press conference here. “We reiterate that the BJP government should release a white paper on the shrinking economy and rising frauds,” he said. “It is getting clearer by the day that the country is heading towards a major recessionary phase. This is a classic case of recession under expansionary trends, as whenever there are three continuous quarters of growth recession (reduction in growth quarter-on-quarter), the chances of slipping into a full-blown recession are significantly higher,” Vallabh said. He added that once the June 2019 quarter numbers were announced, it would be clear that India was witnessing a reduction in growth for five consecutive quarters. Vallabh said the problems that this phenomenon put forth were that natural recovery did not occur and the country had to solely rely on monetary policy actions, while the short-term stimulus remained short-term and only helped in assuaging wounds. “The questions we want to ask the government are what is its response to the prolonged reduction in growth? Does it have any clue of what is actually wrong and who’s responsible for the same,” Shergill said. As a responsible opposition, the Congress wanted the government to immediately issue a white paper on the state of economy, he added. “Rather than a band-aid approach, we want substantial solution to this state of the economy,” the Congress spokesperson said, wondering why the government would not accept that the country was witnessing a recession and it would only be revived when a private and public investment cycle would start in the economy. Shergill alleged a “systematic decimation of the economy” with a worsening distress in the farm sector, factories and finance, adding that only frauds, fake promises and aggression on the system were rampant in the country under the Bharatiya Janata Party’s (BJP) rule. He also alleged that frauds in the banking system shot up by 74 per cent to Rs 71,543 crore in the 2018-19 financial year, compared to frauds worth Rs 41,167 crore committed in the 2017-18 financial year. “RBI data has revealed that 27,125 cases of bank frauds of a whopping Rs 1.74 lakh crore (Rs 1,74,753 lakh crore) were reported in the past five years. Is this amount similar to recapitalisation of banks? Why, suddenly now, so many cases of frauds are out? Is it an indirect way of looting taxpayers’ money?,” the Congress spokesperson asked.last_img read more