South Africa’s 2014 elections – a resource pack

first_imgCompiled by Mary AlexanderOn 7 May 2014 South Africans will vote for their national and provincial government representatives, in the fifth democratic elections since the end of apartheid 20 years ago. We bring you a timetable leading up to the elections, a fun video for first-time voters, and useful contacts for finding out more about the election process.Information courtesy of the Independent Electoral Commission, or IEC, and the Open Society Foundation for South Africa.Jump to:The road to the vote – a 2014 elections timetableThe road to the vote – downloadsVideo: The I Vote South Africa campaign for first-time votersContact Electoral Commission offices countrywideOther useful contactsThe IEC’s Road to 2014 Elections infographic. Click for a larger view.The road to the vote – a 2014 elections timetable25 February – The election date is proclaimed, and the voters’ roll closed.28 to 31 March – Lists of all candidates for political parties, with accompanying documents, open for inspection at the IEC’s national office in Pretoria. See the IEC contact details below.1 April, 17h00 – Deadline for objections to political parties’ candidate lists.7 April, 17h00 – Deadline for the IEC to make decisions on objections to political parties’ candidate lists. Both the parties and objectors are notified of the commission’s decision.7 to 17 April – Applications for special votes open at local IEC offices. See contact details below. You can apply for a special vote if you’re unable to a voting station on election day because you are too old, ill, living with a disability, or pregnant, or if, for some other reason, you won’t be able to get to your voting station on election day.8 to 10 April – Appeals can be made to the Electoral Court against IEC decisions on objections to candidates.10 April – IEC issues the final voting station addresses and maps of mobile voting station routes.15 April, 17h00 – Deadline for the Electoral Court to rule on appeals against IEC decisions regarding objections to candidates. The IEC, political parties and objectors are all notified of the Electoral Court’s decisions.17 April, 17h00 – Deadline for applications for special votes.22 April – IEC releases final lists of candidates and political parties contesting the elections.24 April – IEC issues certificates to political parties.30 April – People living abroad cast their votes – only for national elections – during the office hours of their local South African embassy or consulate. In order to vote, expatriates must have completed a notification form at their embassy or consulate, the deadline for which was 12 March.5 and 6 May, 09h00 to 17h00 – Special votes cast at voting stations and with electoral officers’ visits to the homes of special voters.7 May, 07h00 to 21h00 – Election day in South AfricaYou must vote where you are registered. Check your voting station by SMSing your ID number to 32810 (SMS costs R1), use the My Voter Registration Details app on elections.otg.za, or call the toll-free number 0800 11 8000.Voting stations close at nine at night, but all the people still in the queue at the time must be allowed to cast their vote.DownloadsThe IEC’s Road to the 2014 Elections infographic (740 KB)The IEC’s 2014 Elections timetable (166 KB)Both files in PDFFor first-time voters: the IXSA campaign – I Vote South AfricaWatch time-lapse video of the creation of the IXSA campaign’s graffiti logo:Find out more about the IXSA campaign here.Click the graphic below to download IXSA campaign wallpaper.Contact the Independent Electoral CommissionIEC National OfficeSpokesperson: Kate BapelaTel: 012 622 5700Fax: 012 622 5784Cell: 082 600 6386spokesperson@elections.org.zaEastern CapeProvincial electoral officer: Thami MrajiTel: 043 709 4200Fax: 043 743 4784MrajiT@elections.org.zaFree StateProvincial electoral officer: Chris MephaTel: 051 401 5000Fax: 051 430 4845mephaj@elections.org.zaGautengProvincial electoral officer: Masego SheburiTel: 011 644 7400Fax: 011 644 7448sheburim@elections.org.zaKwaZulu-NatalProvincial electoral officer: Mawethu MoseryTel: 031 279 2200Fax: 031 279 2226MoseryM@elections.org.zaLimpopoProvincial electoral officer: Nkaro MatetaTel: 015 283 9100Fax: 015 297 2506MatetaN@elections.org.zaMpumalangaProvincial electoral officer: Steve NgwenyaTel: 013 754 0200Fax: 013 753 2564NgwenyaS@elections.org.zaNorthern CapeProvincial electoral officer: Bonolo ModiseTel: 053 838 5000Fax: 053 831 8095ModiseB@elections.org.zaNorth WestProvincial electoral officer: Tumi ThibaTel: 018 391 0800Fax: 018 391 0851ThibaT@elections.org.zaWestern CapeProvincial electoral officer: Courtney SampsonTel: 021 910 5700Fax: 021 910 4965SampsonC@elections.org.zaYou can also find the IEC online:Website: www.elections.org.zaCall centre: 0800 11 8000Facebook: www.facebook.com/IECSouthAfricaTwitter: @IECSouthAfricaYouTube: www.youtube.com/user/IECSouthAfricaOther useful election-related contactsAn alphabetical list of contacts for election information, monitoring, advice, training and voter education.Advertising Standards Authority of South Africa (ASA)For information and monitoring of advertising011 781 2006info@asasa.org.zawww.asasa.org.zaBroadcasting Complaints Commission of South Africa (BCCSA)For monitoring broadcasters and making complaints011 325 5736www.bccsa.co.zaCommission for Gender Equality (CGE)For monitoring gender injustice and making complaints011 403 7182www.cge.org.zaDisabled People of South AfricaVoter education for disabled people021 422 0357info@dpsa.org.zawww.dpsa.org.zaElectoral Institute of South Africa (Eisa)For research, information, advice, voter education and resources011 381 6000eisa@eisa.org.zawww.eisa.org.zaFreedom of Expression Institute (FXI)For media monitoring011 482 1913fxi@fxi.orgwww.fxi.org.zaGovernment PrinterFor copies of Government Gazettes, in which election notices and legislation are published012 334 4734-6jpe@print.pwv.gov.zaIndependent Communications Authority of South Africa (Icasa)For information on election broadcasting, as well as advice, monitoring and complaints011 566 3000/1info@icasa.org.zawww.icasa.org.zaIcasa KPMG ethics lineToll-free: 0800 200 796fraud@kpmg.co.zaMedia Institute of Southern Africa (Misa)For coordinating media workersinfo@misa.orgwww.misa.orgMedia Monitoring Project (MMP)For information and monitoring of election reportingContact: William Bird – director011 788 1278williamb@mediamonitoring.org.za or info@mediamonitoring.org.zawww.mediamonitoring.org.zaNational Community Radio Forum (NCRF)For information, training and coordination of community radio reporting and broadcasting011 403 4336info@ncrf.org.zawww.ncrf.org.zaOpen Democracy Advice Centre (ODAC)For training and advocacy to help citizens access information about the government, political parties, and the elections021 461 7211www.opendemocracy.org.zaOpen Society Foundation for South Africa (OSF-SA)For election resources, information and monitoringContact: Fatima Hassan – executive director021 511 1679admin@osfsa.org.zawww.osf.org.zaParliamentary Monitoring Group (PMG)For monitoring and information about South Africa’s parliament021 465 8885info@pmg.org.zawww.pmg.org.zaPress Council of South Africa and South African Press OmbudsmanFor the self-regulation of journalists and monitoring the Press Code011 484 3612/8pressombudsman@ombudsman.org.zawww.presscouncil.org.zaSouth African Human Rights CommissionFor monitoring South Africans’ constitutional human rights, and complaints against human rights abuses011 877 3600complaints@sahrc.org.zawww.sahrc.org.zalast_img read more

Getting Insulation Out of Your Walls and Ceilings

first_imgMore and more builders have realized the advantages of leaving stud bays empty and putting all of a home’s insulation outside of the wall and roof sheathing. If done correctly, exterior insulation can help produce a building that is almost airtight, very well insulated, and almost immune to water damage.The construction method was first developed in the early 1960s by the National Research Council of Canada. In its purest form, the method is known as PERSIST — an acronym for Pressure-Equalized Rain-Screen Insulated Structure Technique.Here’s how you build a PERSIST house:To some builders and building inspectors, PERSIST details seem counterintuitive or dangerous. One typical reaction is, “You can’t install peel-and-stick over your wall sheathing! It’s a wrong-side vapor barrier! The membrane will trap moisture! The walls can’t dry out!”Actually, the peel-and-stick works perfectly. The membrane acts as a combined air barrier, vapor barrier, and water-resistant membrane (WRB). Because the membrane completely seals the walls and roof, it produces an unusually airtight envelope.Since the membrane is on the warm-in-winter side of the insulation, it’s exactly where it belongs. All of the home’s framing and sheathing is on the conditioned side of the membrane, so these wood components are maintained at indoor conditions. That means they aren’t subject to swings in humidity or temperature; the framing stays stable and dry in all seasons, in all climates.On the exterior side of the membrane, there aren’t any components which are likely to suffer any moisture damage. Since the system includes a rainscreen behind the siding, any water that gets past the siding drains quickly from the walls.PERSIST has a few disadvantages. It costs more than conventional construction, because of the cost of the peel-and-stick membrane, the two layers of… This article is only available to GBA Prime Members Start Free Trial Already a member? Log incenter_img Sign up for a free trial and get instant access to this article as well as GBA’s complete library of premium articles and construction details.last_img read more

Give Local America: An opportunity to grow online

first_imgNetwork for Good is happy to partner with Kimbia to extend the reach of Give Local America, a nation-wide giving day that marks the 100-year milestone of community foundations in the United States.This national online giving event will take on May 6, 2014. Give Local America is expected to be the largest online giving day ever held on a single platform. Giving days help nonprofits connect with new donors in an easy and efficient way. Give Local America uses the power and pride of local communities to tie it all together. Want to find out more and get involved? To sign up, visit www.givelocalamerica.org, find your city, and follow the easy registration process.last_img read more

Facebook Ads – Are They Right For Your Nonprofit?

first_img1. What is my goal?Without a goal, your ad campaign will mean nothing and you will be simply throwing money away (and trust me, Facebook doesn’t mind taking it). A reasonable goal could be an increase in email signups from your website. When you create your ad, this will be called the “advertising objective” – it’s what you want people to do when they encounter your ad. Cody suggests (and I agree) that you pick a goal much more in depth than simple clicks to your website. Do you want to measure “website conversions”, which means that when people visit your website, they take an action and “convert”?A successful “conversion” could be signing up for your email newsletter, subscribing to your blog, or making an online donation. 3. Can I afford it? Much has been written recently about the changes in Facebook’s algorithm and its pay-to-play philosophy.Many nonprofits who spent years or months building up an engaged online community on the biggest social network are now seeing a dramatic decline in the number of fans they are able to reach with each post.If this sounds familiar, you may be wondering if Facebook Ads will help your nonprofit reach more fans and get more bang for your Facebook buck.At the recent Social Media for Nonprofits Conference in Boston, Cody Damon of Media Cause provided some insightful advice on whether or not a nonprofit should jump into the Facebook Ads ocean.Before you sit down and purchase a Facebook Ad for your nonprofit, ask yourself these three vital questions:center_img 2. Can I measure it?Whatever the objective, make sure that you can measure it. Just saying “raising awareness for my nonprofit” may not be enough, unless you have specific benchmarks in place to measure your progress.You need to know what success looks like. What will happen if your Facebook Ad is successful? What will have changed? Clients frequently ask me about the price of Facebook Ads. Unlike traditional newspaper ads or billboards, there is no set price for a Facebook Ad.You can set your daily budget, or “lifetime” budget, and you will need to choose a CPM (cost per thousand impressions) or CPC (cost per click bid). You only pay for the impressions or clicks that your ad receives, and if they are targeted well, this can be very effective.If this all seems like Greek to you, you are probably not ready to run a Facebook Ad without outside help. Facebook has a great help center on their website, and there are many firms and consultants who can help you set it up and run it.General best practices for your Facebook Ad:It must be eye-catching and well-written. Do not use your logo and call it “Come to our website!”It must have a photo. For all ads, the best size image to upload is 1200×627 pixels,The photo cannot contain more than 20% text.If it directs to an outside website, it should direct to a specific landing page, rather than just the main home page of your website.For more on using Facebook Ads to build your online community and engage with your fans, read these great posts by Jon Loomer, John Haydon, Nancy Schwartz and David Serfaty.Julia Campbell works with nonprofits to help them raise money online, conquer social media, and become content experts. Her blog on nonprofit marketing is at www.jcsocialmarketing.comlast_img read more

Join the MHTF and the Wilson Center September 23 to Launch: “Delivering Success: Scaling Up Solutions for Maternal Health”

first_img ShareEmailPrint To learn more, read: Posted on September 16, 2013February 2, 2017By: Sarah Blake, MHTF consultantClick to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to email this to a friend (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window)Next Monday, September 23, the MHTF will join the Wilson Center in launching a new report, Delivering Success: Scaling Up Solutions for Maternal Health, which draws on the experiences of the Advancing Policy Dialogue in Maternal Health series. The launch event will be held from 3:00-5:00 pm (EDT) at the Wilson Center, in Washington, DC, and will feature speakers from the MHTF and several of our partners and colleagues, including UNFPA and the Public Health Foundation of India.From the event announcement:Since 2009, the Wilson Center’s Advancing Dialogue on Maternal Health series, one of the few forums dedicated to maternal health, has brought together experts, donors, and policymakers from around the world to leverage their collective knowledge and move forward on reducing pregnancy-related deaths and complications. As part of the 2012-2013 series, the Wilson Center and the Population Foundation of India convened a workshop on neglected maternal health issues which brought together participants in New Delhi with audiences at the Wilson Center and the Harvard School of Public Health. Join us as we launch Delivering Success: Scaling Up Solutions for Maternal Health, a new report which captures, analyzes, and synthesizes the strategies and recommendations that emerged from the series. Delivering Success consolidates key findings and ties them to discussions taking place in global forums.If you are interested in attending the event in person, visit the Wilson Center for more details, or RSVP here. To join the discussion on Twitter, use the hashtag #MHDialogue.Share this:last_img read more

Overcoming Obstacles to Sustainable Funding: What Nonprofits Need to Thrive

first_imgHow do you fund your mission?A healthy nonprofit has multiple sources of funding, including individual giving. Depending entirely on grants or public funding is risky, as either could be lost without any control on the part of the nonprofit. A robust fundraising program provides needed financial security, expands your community, and grows awareness for your cause.How do you make sure your fundraising is successful? The best way to get started is to sit down and create a plan.The Number One Indicator of Fundraising SuccessAccording to the Individual Donor Benchmark Report, which studies nonprofits with operating budgets under $2 million, the number one indicator of success is having a written fundraising plan.Nonprofits with a fundraising plan—even if they don’t end up using it—are more likely to be successful. Why? The act of planning—going through last year’s numbers, analyzing results, assessing your financial health and looking for growth areas—gives you a healthy foundation to grow your programs. It keeps you focused, helps you think critically about new fundraising ideas, and ensures your activities support your mission.Want more planning resources? Check out 8 Resources to Help with Fundraising Planning.We know that fundraising planning is important. So, are nonprofits listening?Network for Good recently surveyed 10,000 small to mid-sized nonprofits to learn more about how they depend on fundraising plans, and the results were fascinating, to say the least.Q1: Do you currently have a written, 12-month fundraising plan from which you are managing revenue-generating activities to balance your budget?On the surface, it seems like many nonprofits are already using fundraising plans. But what about those ones who aren’t?Q2: If you don’t have a fundraising plan, what is the leading factor that is hindering your ability to create and implement one?A lack of time is the leading factor preventing nonprofit managers from developing a written fundraising plan, followed by a lack of insights and strategic know-how.Of course, it takes more than just a fundraising plan to ensure success—the plan is just the beginning. Successful fundraising is predicated upon multiple factors: a written plan, an effective strategy and case for support, staff and board consistently implementing tasks, and technology to track and build donor relationships.Unfortunately that’s often a tall order in a small shop. Often understaffed and underfunded, how does a small nonprofit afford the time and strategic help needed to develop a plan and sustain their mission?A New Model for SuccessNetwork for Good has initiated a new strategy to help smaller nonprofits move to more diversified and sustainable fundraising. We have coupled access to a personal fundraising coach with simple, easy-to-use fundraising software to ensure small nonprofits can continue their mission and sustain funding for programs commonly dropped due to lack of funding.In particular, the software and coaching combination was designed to help small and medium-sized nonprofits accomplish everything they need to thrive, including:Engage their boards in fundraising activities.Craft compelling stories to reach donors’ minds and hearts.Plan a successful year-end fundraising campaign.Analyze data to better understand their donors and inform their plan.Sounds great, right? The question is, does this model of software and coaching really work?The short answer is YES.Participating nonprofits raised, on average, 27% more revenue without a net increase to their expenses.What’s a Personal Fundraising Coach?So, you may be familiar with Network for Good’s software: donor management (designed just for small nonprofits) and fully integrated campaign pages. But what about the personal fundraising coach?Participating nonprofits are matched with a fundraising expert who has experience within their cause area and whose expertise matches their unique needs and challenges. Organizations get the help they need when they need it, without the risk of hiring a full time fundraising professional.These individuals provide one-on-one strategic support in everything ranging from creating a 12-month fundraising plan to developing a successful event to crafting an effective appeal. Whatever individual challenges a nonprofit is currently facing, the coach is there to provide strategic guidance.Looking ForwardIn recent years, many small nonprofits have struggled to find ways to create a model for survival, let alone growth. Diversified funding, affordable yet effective tools, and the help of a personal fundraising coach have helped hundreds of nonprofits in the last year to build a more certain and sustainable future.Click here to talk to us. We’ll give you an overview of the software, strategy, and coaching that can help your organization thrive.last_img read more

NFG Staff Profile: Lenny Wrigley

first_imgFrom an internship at an LGBTQ nonprofit to his time on staff at an animal rescue organization, and now with Network for Good, Lenny Wrigley has lived the day-to-day of nonprofits for the past six years. In his role as customer success specialist, Lenny serves as a guide for many nonprofits as they join the Network for Good family.“Nonprofits are what makes the world go ‘round. They’re how we get change in the world. There are a lot of people who are scared of change, even in nonprofits, but change is a good thing. That’s what nonprofits are trying to accomplish. At Network for Good, I get to be part of that process of change with a wide range of nonprofits, from animal rights to religious rights to gender identity and sexual orientation rights. It’s a full spectrum. It feels good to help. Change and challenge is what we need in the world.”Q&A with Lenny Wrigley, Customer Success SpecialistWhat do you do at Network for Good?I work with nonprofits during their first 90 days with Network for Good, getting them up and running smoothly in the system and teaching them the tools and best practices.I currently work with about 100 nonprofits. I love directing and coaching them and seeing their growth. I enjoy sharing different issues other nonprofits have had and how to get ahead of the problem with our software. I’m a very proactive person, so I like teaching them how to avoid certain habits.What is your experience with nonprofit organizations?I interned for a semester with the Family Equality Council on their communications team, helping with their website, writing blog posts, and contacting their members to participate in different articles and activities.After that, I worked at the Humane Rescue Alliance, interviewing people who needed to surrender their dogs, discussing their different options, and providing resources. With a job like that—when you’re dealing with the life and death of an animal—when it’s rewarding, it can bring you to tears. At the same time, when it’s not rewarding it has the exact same result. I have a lot of respect for anyone who works at a rescue organization.What is your favorite thing to do when you’re not at work?I’m in school right now, studying behavioral science and religion, and then I start seminary school in June, so that keeps me very busy. I love to read books. I recently read UnClobber: Rethinking Our Misuse of the Bible on Homosexuality, which looks at the different scriptures that have been used against the LGBTQ community and how they’ve been taken so out of context that they’re not the same scriptures that they were thousands of years ago.I’m also a fan of hopelessly romantic stories like Me Before You and Nicholas Sparks’ books; self-help and positive psychology books; and the Harry Potter series. This past Christmas I read Becoming by Michelle Obama. I love to be in a library or book store and just read books all day and not have to worry about anything else. I wasn’t like that as a kid. I wouldn’t pick up a book as a kid.Lightning RoundDream vacation? IsraelMost recent book read? Torn by Justin LeeLast movie seen in movie theater? The Best of EnemiesYour theme song? Anything by Taylor Swift!Favorite color? PurpleRead more on The Nonprofit Bloglast_img read more

Security reproductive rights investment how politics touched us this week

first_imgOTTAWA – Piercing the winter doldrums was the political goal of the week for all three party leaders.Justin Trudeau took to town halls in Quebec and northern Ontario to show he is a man of the people.Andrew Scheer went to Washington to talk up the benefits of NAFTA and show he is a statesman-in-waiting.And Jagmeet Singh invited media to peek in at his marriage proposal to designer Gurkiran Kaur, to show he is a man of Instagram.Spectacle aside, the week in Canadian politics revealed developments in global security, reproductive rights and the health of business investment. Here’s how:GLOBAL SECURITYThe jury is still out over whether Tuesday’s foreign ministers’ meeting in Vancouver, co-hosted by Canada and the United States, hurt or helped ease the tension around North Korea and its nuclear arsenal.The summit saw the foreign ministers declare their dedication to United Nations sanctions in an effort to force North Korea to de-nuclearize. They also sent a signal to China and Russia, who were not invited to the meeting, that they were not doing enough to enforce the sanctions effort.And U.S. Secretary of State Rex Tillerson pointed to North Korea’s plans to participate in the Olympics next month in South Korea as proof that the U.S. approach to North Korea — which has included aggressive tweeting between leaders Donald Trump and Kim Jong Un — actually works.But China and Russia did not take kindly to their exclusion from the meeting.And by the end of the week, North Korea was perhaps showing cold feet on the Olympics, cancelling a scheduled visit to South Korea to prepare for the event.REPRODUCTIVE RIGHTSThe Liberals launched another youth-oriented program this week with an insistence that groups receiving government funding actively declare they are pro-choice.The prime minister used an Instagram video to roll out the new Canada Service Corps, which earmarks $105 million over three years to helping young people with volunteer work.Like the Canada Summer Jobs program, where any group seeking funding will need to check a box declaring its pro-choice credentials, similar criteria are being used to determine eligibility for service corps funds. Trudeau says government money should not go to groups that don’t respect women’s rights.The move has prompted a debate over ideology, the reach of the charter, freedom of religion and whether the Liberals have gone too far. On Friday, the abortion rights group that drove the pro-choice requirement for the Canada Summer Jobs program wondered aloud if the Liberals had overstepped.The Conservatives, for their part, have accused Trudeau of imposing his values on others. But they want to know more about the program requirements before they go further in their criticism.Trump, meanwhile, addressed an anti-abortion march on Friday in Washington, where he insisted that Americans are becoming more anti-abortion all the time.QUEASY INVESTORSThe on-again-off-again future of the North American Free Trade Agreement is not sitting well with companies doing business in Canada, and the uncertainty is starting to bite, the Bank of Canada warned this week.Central bank governor Stephen Poloz says NAFTA uncertainty and pro-business tax cuts in the United States are driving investment away from Canada, hurting the Canadian economy.Policy-makers have long had their eye on Canada’s lacklustre business investment record, looking at ways to turn it around.So the central bank’s findings put pressure on the federal government to seek a quicker resolution to the renegotiation of NAFTA. Negotiations meet in Montreal in coming days for their sixth round of talks. Progress towards a resolution has been sparse, and there are growing fears the United States is losing its patience.And Canadian associations representing big and small businesses alike are raising the alarm about Canada losing a competitive edge on the tax front.Ottawa has argued repeatedly, however, that Canada’s investment regime remains as attractive as ever. Trudeau is heading to Davos this coming week to mingle with the rich and famous to pitch that very message to multinational corporations he hopes to lure to here.Note to readers: This is a corrected story. An earlier version said Canada Service Corps applicants would need to check a box to declare their pro-choice stance.last_img read more

GoFundMe Support Fund for Matt Jr Beckerton

first_img‘We are uncertain of the extensive damages as for more tests will be carried out.  He has a very long road ahead of him as well as his family.  His Dad Matt is by side and his Mom Ashley is back home caring for his 3 older brothers.’The GoFundMe account goes on to share the money is to help support the family in their time of need, and the long journey they have ahead.The account set up on March, 14th, 2019 is at $8,345 out of its $10,000 goalTo view the GoFundMe account; CLICK HERE FORT ST. JOHN, B.C. – Young, Matt Jr Beckerton had an incident with accidentally ingesting a chemical solution that has sent him to Children’s Hospital in serious condition.In speaking with Matt Beckerton, he shared “Our family is very happy with our community spirit, all their kind words and support means more than the world to us right now.”According to the GoFundMe account;last_img read more