Jain On How Coachella Helps International Artists Honoring Miriam Makebas Legacy More

first_imgWe caught up with the French pop performer in Indio, where she touched on her first Coachella experience, how living abroad has informed her artistry, and much moreAna YglesiasGRAMMYs Apr 19, 2019 – 11:22 am GRAMMY-nominated French artist Jain makes upbeat yet socially conscious inspired pop music. Using sounds and inspiration from her global upbringing, Jain (born Jeanne Louise Galice) left her hometown of Toulouse, France, with her family when she was nine. From then until she was 18, she lived in Dubai, the Congo and Abu Dhabi before returning to France to attend art school in Paris, where she lives now.Jain made her Coachella debut at Gobi stage last Saturday, her first U.S. show of the year, and will be returning this weekend for round two. Not only that, but Jain just dropped her first new music since her 2018 album Souldier, a single called “Gloria,” which she has been playing on tour in Europe.We caught up with Jain on the ground in Indio, where she touched on her first Coachella experience, how living abroad has informed her artistry, and much more.You had your Coachella debut yesterday; how did you feel to share your music at this festival, on this platform?Well, it was amazing and this show was really cool. We have a lot of fun with the crowd, so I couldn’t have been going any better. I was feeling really lucky to be there today in this festival because it’s one of the biggest festivals in the world. And in France, it’s well known also. Because always there are French artists that are playing over there. So we were really, really happy.The international contingent of artists on the lineup this year is really strong; what does it feel like to you to be a part of it?It was amazing because for me to be able to play as a French artist. I’m from a little town from the south tip of France, to be able to play in Coachella and meet other artists from all over the world and to connect with people that I love from my hometown is something amazing. And it shows the real power of music is to be united with something that everybody loves. And that’s why music is so international. And I think it’s great that a big festival like Coachella makes this actually. It helps a lot of artists.Yeah. I agree. Were you able to check out any other artists at the festival? Was there anyone you were really excited about?Yeah, I saw a lot of shows actually. I saw Anderson .Paak; for me it was one of the best shows that I’ve ever seen. And I saw Childish Gambino. I saw the Boyfriends. They are Australian, I think.You spent time growing up around the world. How do you think living in these different place inspired your art and music?It really gave me this need to express myself. Because when you are a teenager and you have to be new in a new high school and make new friends and make friends again, sometimes you get this feeling of loneliness. And for me it was why I was writing music, it was because I felt lonely and I wanted to make kind of therapy with it. So I don’t know if I would have done music if I haven’t traveled. So the traveling and discovering new countries meant everything for me and my songwriting.Do you feel like that caused you to grow up more quickly? To have a more mature themes or ideas with your music?Yeah, I’m definitely sure about this. My music would be very, very different if I haven’t traveled. And it’s true that when you’re young, you’re fast and there’s no concern with people, actually. When you’re doing music and you’re young, you can be in a band with different people with different stories also. And that’s why I really loved it.You released your sophomore album, Souldier, last year. What did you wish to communicate with that album?For me, Souldier is the part two of [debut album] Zanaka, the rest of my experience in the Middle East. The two albums work together. For me, Zanaka was more about when I was 16, 18 years old, and Souldier is the rest. I really wanted to put music that I was listening to and I was listening to—Arabic kind of music, hip-hop, some Rumba from the Congo. And I really wanted to make people travel by listening to my music. I always write about something that moves me. And something, it can be something bad or something sad like the killing in the nightclub of Orlando. I always try to put some optimism in it. I try to heal myself.Your music video for “Makeba” was nominated for a GRAMMY at the 60th GRAMMY Awards. Can you explain the story behind that specific song and video?When I worked with [French directors] Greg & Lio, for me it was really important to shoot it in South Africa because [the song’s subject, musician Miriam Makeba] was from South Africa. And we were about to shoot this video in Soweto, which is outside of Johannesburg. It’s where she grew up, actually. I really wanted for people to know her and to be able to share her legacy of music. That’s so cool. Is that something that’s important for you, to share stories of other female artists or other people that might not have a platform like you have?For me, it’s really important because I was listening to Makeba since I was three years old. She’s really part of my music intention. And when I grew up, I realized that actually a lot of my friends didn’t know her. When I like an artist, especially a female artist, I really try to support. I think it’s really important these days.Mon Laferte Talks First Coachella Performance, ‘Norma’ & MoreRead more Twitter Facebook News Email Jain On How Coachella Helps International Artists jain-how-coachella-helps-international-artists-honoring-miriam-makebas-legacy-more Jain On How Coachella Helps International Artists, Honoring Miriam Makeba’s Legacy & More last_img read more

PETA Protests Wilmington Company

first_imgWILMINGTON, MA — Below is a press release from PETA:Armed with signs that proclaim, “Charles River Is Hell for Animals” and “Stop Animal Testing,” a group of PETA supporters gathered outside Charles River Laboratories in Wilmington on Thursday, April 25, 2019 during World Week for Animals in Laboratories.The Wilmington-based laboratory-for-hire performs poisoning tests on monkeys, dogs, rabbits, guinea pigs, and other animals and is also the world’s largest breeder of animals for use in experiments.“Charles River supplies one of every two animals used in experiments, so it has a hand in fully half of all the pain, misery, fear, and distress endured by animals in laboratories around the world,” says PETA Senior Vice President Kathy Guillermo. “This World Week for Animals in Laboratories, PETA is calling for an end to cruel and unreliable tests on animals.”PETA notes that Charles River Laboratories intentionally poisons animals by force-feeding them test compounds, smears caustic experimental chemicals onto their bare skin, and forces them to inhale toxic substances in painful and deadly experiments. The company’s history of animal-welfare violations includes failure to provide animals with veterinary care, failure to provide suffering animals with pain relief, and shoddy surgical methods.PETA Protestors outside Charles River Lab in Wilmington (Photo courtesy of PETA’s Twitter account)###Charles River Labs addresses its animal testing practices on its website:“Animals have contributed to nearly every medical breakthrough in recent history, including treatments for cancer, diabetes, and AIDS, and they continue to play an essential role in the development of life-saving drugs for people and other animals. The welfare of the animals contributing to research is of utmost importance and a prerequisite for the accuracy, reliability, and translatability of our research.”Like Wilmington Apple on Facebook. Follow Wilmington Apple on Twitter. Follow Wilmington Apple on Instagram. Subscribe to Wilmington Apple’s daily email newsletter HERE. Got a comment, question, photo, press release, or news tip? Email wilmingtonapple@gmail.com.Share this:TwitterFacebookLike this:Like Loading… RelatedWilmington’s Charles Rivers Announces Recipients Of 1st Annual ‘Research Models in Drug Discovery’ AwardIn “Business”Wilmington’s Charles River Labs To Hold World Congress On Animal Models In Drug Discovery & DevelopmentIn “Business”Wilmington’s Charles River Labs Settles Overbilling Allegations For $1.8 MillionIn “Business”last_img read more

AL restored oneparty BAKSAL rule

first_imgBNP secretary general Mirza Fakhrul Islam Alamgir. File PhotoBangladesh Nationalist Party (BNP) on Friday alleged that the ruling Awami League has depoliticised the country by ‘restoring one-party BAKSAL rule as it did in 1975’, reports UNB.”Now, there’s no politics in the country. Politics is now under the grip of one party,” said BNP secretary general Mirza Fakhrul Islam Alamgir.He came up with the remarks while exchanging views with local journalists at his house in Thakurgaon.The BNP leader said multiparty democracy was restored by their party founder Ziaur Rahman after Awami League had introduced one-party BAKSAL rule in 1975. “The one-party rule has now been again restored undercover of democracy.”He said their chairperson Khaleda Zia has been subjected to government’s political vengeance as she has been kept in jail by convicting her in ‘false’ cases.Fakhrul alleged that Khaleda is neither getting bail from the court nor proper treatment by the government though she is very sick.He renewed their party’s demand for shifting Khaleda to a specialised private hospital for her proper treatment.The BNP leader said Jatiya Oikya Front is united though two – MPs of Gono Forum, one of its components, took oath violating the alliance’s decision.”Organisational action has been taken against those who have taken oath. We’re united and working for the restoration of democracy. We must move forward together with people,” he said.About the stance of their party and the alliance on the current government, Fakhrul said they think Awami League has been ruling the country illegally by usurping the state power. “There’s no reason to accept such a regime.”He demanded the government immediately hold a fresh national election annulling the results of the 10th parliamentary one.last_img read more

Magura hides hydraulic hoses inside the handlebar

first_img Find out about drug treatment for AML on AllMedx.com. What are the risk factors for acute myeloid leukemia? See the statistics on AllMedx.com. The brake levers engage the cylinders via internal push rods, and can be taken off and replaced with other Magura levers depending on the rider’s preference. Given that the expansion reservoir dimensions and piston diameter of the MCi cylinders are the same as those of the company’s more conventional MT-series brakes, braking power is reportedly equivalent to that system. That said, Magura claims that MCi offers a “more direct braking feeling,” along with better modulation.There is presently no word on when the technology may be commercially available, or how much it will cost. For now, though, you can see it being demonstrated in the video below.Previously, Magura has brought us innovations such as a wirelessly-activated dropper seatpost, an electronically self-adjusting suspension fork, and hydraulic rim brakes for road bikes.Source: Magura via Pinkbike Apollo Historic Mission Control Restoration Time-lapse I consent to the use of Google Analytics and related cookies across the TrendMD network (widget, website, blog). Learn more AllMedX AllMedX AllMedX IDH1 mutation testing for AML is important for diagnosis. Review the details. AllMedX Google Analytics settings We recommendcenter_img In order to keep things streamlined, tidy and protected, many mountain bikes already feature hydraulic brake hoses that are internally routed through the frame. German manufacturer Magura is taking things further, however, with a system that also sticks those hoses inside the handlebar.Known as Magura Cockpit Integration (MCi), the presently-experimental setup moves each brake’s hydraulic cylinder from the front of the system-specific handlebar into its hollow interior, inside the area where the grips are located. A hose runs from the inside end of each cylinder through the bar to a coupler within the stem, with two other hoses proceeding from that coupler to each of the brakes. This arrangement allows the MCi to be temporarily disconnected from the rest of the bike for servicing, without losing any hydraulic fluid. And when the brake lines need to be bled, the job can be performed via bleed screws located at each end of the handlebar. What hematologic cancer is more common in older men? Find out on AllMedx.com. A hose runs from the inside end of each MCi cylinder through the bar to a coupler within the stem, with two other hoses proceeding from that coupler to each of the brakesMagura AllMedX Privacy policy Powered by Yes No Acute myeloid leukemia drug treatment: Resources on AllMedx.com. AllMedX Relapsed AML treatment research updates available on AllMedx.comlast_img read more