The Wilmington Insider For September 2 2018

first_imgWILMINGTON, MA — Below is a round-up of what’s going on in Wilmington on Sunday, September 2, 2018:Happening Today:Weather: Cloudy through mid morning, then gradual clearing, with a high near 82. Calm wind becoming south 5 to 9 mph in the afternoon.In The Community: The Wilmington Farmers Market continues its season from 10am to 1pm on the Swain Green (across from the Town Common). See this week’s lineup HERE.In The Community: The Middlesex Canal Museum and Visitors’ Center (71 Faulkner Street, North Billerica) is open from noon to 4pm.  Learn about the canal, which travels through Wilmington.MBTA Reminder: There will be no weekend commuter rail service on the Lowell Line (Wilmington Center) until December. A free shuttle bus will be available. Learn more HERE.Food Shopping: Food shopping in town this week?  In case you haven’t seen this week’s circulars, Wilmington Apple has you covered:This week’s circular from Market Basket (260 Main Street) can be found HERE.This week’s circular from Lucci’s Market (211 Lowell Street) can be found HERE.Elia’s Country Store (381 Middlesex Avenue) does not have an online circular, but the store posts its hot entree schedule and other specials on its Facebook page HERE.(NOTE: What did I miss? Let me know by commenting below, commenting on the Facebook page, or emailing wilmingtonapple@gmail.com. I may be able to update this post.)Like Wilmington Apple on Facebook. Follow Wilmington Apple on Twitter. Follow Wilmington Apple on Instagram. Subscribe to Wilmington Apple’s daily email newsletter HERE. Got a comment, question, photo, press release, or news tip? Email wilmingtonapple@gmail.com.Share this:TwitterFacebookLike this:Like Loading… Related5 Things To Do In Wilmington On Sunday, September 1, 2019In “5 Things To Do Today”5 Things To Do In Wilmington On Sunday, August 4, 2019In “5 Things To Do Today”5 Things To Do In Wilmington On Sunday, July 14, 2019In “5 Things To Do Today”last_img read more

Slack outage is over so you might want to get back to

first_img In addition to slow performance, some customers may also be running into trouble accessing their Slack channels entirely. We’re digging into this and will be back with more updates soon. https://t.co/ZstseqpFlL— Slack Status (@SlackStatus) July 29, 2019 0 @SlackHQ is down… what to do we do now… how did we communicate before this? #slack #downtime #keepcalmandkeepworking pic.twitter.com/0RYmlxOD5e— Sam Forde (@samjforde) July 29, 2019 Not a way to start a Monday. Slack Yep, there was a Slack outage Monday morning. The company gave a status update about the problem saying, “Some workspaces might be experiencing issues with messages sending and loading.” After approximately 40 minutes of downtime, the service was back up.Slack updated its status page at 8:30 a.m. PT as the service returned, with the message that people “may be running into trouble accessing their Slack workspaces completely.” The company’s Twitter account also said there would be “slow performance” as the team messaging service comes back online.   Share your voice Downdetector received more than 2,000 reports of users having problems with Slack. According to the site, the outage started at approximately 7:50 a.m. PT and had a global reach. Those who depend on Slack for their work weren’t too happy with the outage, especially on a Monday. Many took to Twitter to react to the platform going down. Post a commentcenter_img When #slack is down and you’re remote today. pic.twitter.com/Jt6JMv69rG— Paulina Gallo ✨ (@paulpaultweets) July 29, 2019 SLACK IS DOWNQUICK, EVERYONE SEND AN EMAIL— Kelly Vaughn 🐞 (@kvlly) July 29, 2019 At the end of June, Slack suffered a three-hour outage that was due to some of its servers being unavailable. Originally published on July 29 at 8:15 a.m. PT:Update, 8:19 a.m. PT: Adds Downdetector details. 8:32 a.m. PT: Adds Twitter reactions. 8:53 a.m. PT: Adds details on the end of outage. Tags Computerslast_img read more

Surfing at the 2020 Olympics What you need to know about the

first_img Share your voice 2020 Olympics Tokyo 2020 shows off Olympic medals made from old phones Karate at the 2020 Tokyo Olympics: Everything you need to know Your guide to basketball at the 2020 Tokyo Summer Olympics Everything you should know about skateboarding at the 2020 Summer Olympics How do athletes qualify to surf at the 2020 Olympics?Firstly, athletes must comply with the current Olympic Charter, the document that sets forth rules and guidelines for Olympic athletes and the Olympic Games. It’s a hefty 103-page file that includes rules such as the “citizenship requirement rule” (Rule 41) that states athletes must be a “national” of the country they represent in competition. And, of course, Rule 43, which details the World Anti-Doping Code and the Olympic Movement Code on the Prevention of Manipulation of Competitions.A total of 40 surfers (20 men and 20 women) will qualify for surfing at the 2020 Olympics. A maximum of four surfers (2 men and 2 women) can compete from each country’s National Olympic Committee — the governing body in each country that regulates athlete participation in the Olympics. Athletes will qualify for the Olympics if they meet performance qualification criteria at one of the following events: 2019 World Surf League (WSL) Championship Tour (CT): 10 men and eight women2019 ISA World Surfing Games: Four men and four women2020 ISA World Surfing Games: Four men and six womenContinental representation: With the exception of North and South America, the highest-placed eligible athlete from each continent at the 2019 ISA World Surfing Games (someone who didn’t yet qualify) gains one spot. For the Americas, continental representation comes from the highest-placed eligible athlete (who hasn’t already qualified through other events) at the 2019 Pan American Games. Host nation slot: The Olympic Games guarantees one male and one female place for the host nation, in this case Japan. If athletes from Japan qualify regularly (through one of the events above), the host nation slots will be reallocated to the highest-ranked eligible surfers from the 2020 World Surfing Games.See the full qualification criteria for more details.2018 Russian Surfing Championships in SochiThere are many types of surfboards, but the primary categories include shortboard and longboard. Olympic surfers will use shortboards, which are known for their pointed noses and excellent maneuverability.  Sergei Bobylev/Getty Images When and where is surfing happening?The 2020 Olympic Games surfing program will take place at Tsurigasaki Beach in Chiba, Japan from July 24 to August 9, 2020.Check out the full Olympic schedule of events here.What will the events be like? Surfing consists primarily of two disciplines: shortboard and longboard. At the 2020 Olympics, all athletes will surf shortboard. A shortboard refers to any board that’s shorter than seven feet in length. They usually have a pointed nose and are lightweight. They’re designed to be quick and accurate, and are more suited to fast and powerful waves than are longboards. In heats of 20 to 30 minutes, Olympic judges will analyze four athletes at a time, with the top two scores advancing to the next round. Because surfing conditions are so variable, the IOC has allowed for the surfing competition to take place over 16 days in the case that weather presents safety concerns or unfair circumstances.How will the athletes be judged?Judges will rate athletes on the type and difficulty of maneuvers performed. One example of an advanced surfing move is the aerial, where a surfer finds a ramp within a wave and launches off of the lip, gains air and lands back on the face of the wave. For even more jaw drops, a surfer would spin in a complete circle while in the air and still manage to land gracefully — a surfing move known as the 360.The judges will also account for speed, power and flow. Like other Olympic events, judges will score surfers from 1 to 10 with two decimals, for example, 7.91. Only one surfer may ride a wave at any given time, and athletes may lose points for failing to use common surfer etiquette, which rules that the surfer closest to the peak of a wave has right of way for that wave.  Fitness Sport and Outdoors Post a commentcenter_img Tags 0 The 2020 Summer Olympics Surfing will make its Olympic debut at the 2020 Games in Japan. Athletes will surf at Tsurigasaki Beach in Chiba, Japan. Brian Bielmann / AFP/Getty Images 100 years ago, Duke Kahanamoku dreamt of surfing in the Olympic Games. He was a five-time Olympic medalist for swimming, but in between Olympic competitions and after his retirement, Kahanamoku, a Native Hawaiian and the “father of modern surfing,” traveled internationally to popularize the sport of surfing. Back in the early 1900s, it was known only to Hawaii, which had yet to become a US state. Kahanamoku would be proud to know that in 2016, the International Olympic Committee (IOC) unanimously decided to include surfing in the Olympic Games for the first time. Surfing will debut at the 2020 Olympic Games in Japan. Keep reading for everything you need to know about the new Olympic sport.last_img read more

Homeless Syrians sell furniture to survive

first_imgA picture taken on 13 June, shows a second-hand store where displaced Syrians (unseen) sell their belongings on the outskirts of the Syrian town of Abyan in the rebel-held western Aleppo province. Photo: AFPFor years, Abu Ali sold used furniture and home appliances for a living. But he never thought Syria’s war would one day make him homeless and force him to sell his own.His family is one of dozens stranded in olive groves along the Turkish border, who say they have had to sell their basic possessions to ensure survival.”I sold them to provide food, drink and clothes for my children,” said the father of five, who now houses his family in a tent.An opposition bastion in Syria’s northwest has come under heavy regime and Russian bombardment since late April, despite a truce deal intended to protect the jihadist-run enclave’s three million inhabitants.The spike in violence in and around Idlib province has killed hundreds of civilians, displaced 330,000 more, and sparked fears of one of the worst humanitarian disasters in the eight-year civil war.Abu Ali, his wife and their children fled their home in southern Idlib in early May, hitting the road north to seek shelter in the relative safety of the olive groves close to the border.”I used to have a shop to buy and sell used items,” such as fridges and furniture in the village of Maaret Hurma, he told AFP, sitting in the shade of a tree near the border town of Atme.Very low priceA few days after fleeing his home village, he hired two trucks for 50,000 Syrian pounds (over $110) to bring “eight fridges, bedroom furnishings, seven washing machines, and several gas stoves” up to the olive grove.But under the summer sun in the makeshift camp, the merchandise soon plummeted in value.”I was forced to get rid of it or sell it — even at a very low price,” the 35-year-old said, his chin stubble already greying under a head of thick dark brown hair.For example, the going price for a fridge originally bought for 25,000 Syrian pounds (more than $55) can be as low as a fifth of that price.In Atme, some families have stored their fridges and other appliances in a single tent to protect them from the elements.Outside, a top-loader washing machine sits in the shade of a tree.Awad Abu Abdu, 35, said he too was forced to part with all his household items for a pittance.”It was very dear to me. It was all I had accumulated over a lifetime of hard work,” said the former construction worker, who fled the village of Tramla with his wife and six children.”I sold all our home’s furniture for just 50,000 Syrian pounds,” he said, dressed in a faded grey t-shirt fraying around the collar.After transport costs, he was left with only half that amount to feed his family, he said.Abu Abdu accused buyers of “cheating us, exploiting the displaced”, but said he had no other choice.”Everything’s so expensive… and there are no organisations looking out for us,” he said.Forced to sellThe Idlib region is supposed to be protected by a buffer zone deal signed by Russia and rebel backer Turkey in September.But the accord was never properly implemented as jihadists refused to withdraw from the planned cordon.Hayat Tahrir al-Sham, an alliance led by Syria’s former Al-Qaeda affiliate, took over administrative control of the region in January.In the town of Atareb — about 30 kilometres from Atme, in Aleppo province — Abu Hussein received a new delivery at his shop of second-hand household appliances and furniture.”Every day, more than ten cars arrive loaded up with items the displaced try to sell us,” said the 35-year-old.”This means we have to pay relatively low prices, because the supply is so high” and it’s hard to then sell them all, he said.Back in Atme, 50-year-old Waleeda Derwish said she hoped she would find someone to buy her fridge, washing machine and television, to help her provide for her eight children.The widow transported the electrical items to “save them from bombing or looting” in Maaret Hurma, she said, a bright blue scarf wrapped around her wrinkled face.Now the appliances represent the family’s only lifeline, she said.”I’m forced to sell them. How else are we supposed to live?”last_img read more