England Golf Awards – what it means to win!

first_imgNominations are sought for seven award categories:Club of the Year sponsored by HowDidIDoThe stand-out club, recognised for its inspiring, forward-thinking approachMost Welcoming Golf ClubFor the club which goes above and beyond to reach out to allCounty of the YearThe county which does its best for its players and clubsVolunteer of the YearSomeone whose commitment and contribution has a huge impact in golfYoung Ambassador of the YearA young person, aged under 25 on the day of the Awards, who represents the very best of their generationCoach of the YearA PGA-accredited coach whose passion and commitment helps to grow the gameLifetime Service AwardSomeone who has made a remarkable contribution to golf over many years 9 Nov 2017 England Golf Awards – what it means to win! Who will win the England Golf Awards 2018? What will it mean?To find out, we asked two winners from this year’s Awards to tell us how their success had made a difference.Emma Anderson, the Young Ambassador of the Year, and Jenny Holmes from Fynn Valley, the Most Welcoming Club, are both enjoying the benefits of their wins – and urging everyone to make their nominations now for the 2018 Awards.  The Awards will be presented at a glitzy, black-tie event at The Royal Lancaster London, on Thursday, 22 February 2018.Fynn Valley Golf Club, near Ipswich in Suffolk, won the Most Welcoming Golf Club Award – and put itself firmly on the map.  “It definitely raised our profile,” said Jenny Holmes, a director of the rural, family-run cub. “People heard of us nationally and it was really nice to have a positive news story to tell.”The club was featured in the golf media and in local press and radio – and the video made for the England Golf Awards dinner now takes pride of place on the Fynn Valley website.“We wouldn’t have produced it because it would look as though we were blowing our own trumpet. But if someone else wants to say those things about you it’s great!” said Jenny.The warm welcome is part and parcel of the Fynn Valley experience and it’s set to get even better. “Winning the award has given us a fantastic message to carry forward,” said Jenny. “We are building a brand new clubhouse which will open in autumn 2018, it’s purpose designed and has a central reception area which can only improve the welcome. It’s really exciting.”Jenny urges other clubs to get nominated for the 2018 awards. “I didn’t think we stood a chance – so give it a go!”Nottinghamshire’s Emma Anderson was honoured as England’s Young Ambassador of the Year in recognition of her work in her county to inspire new players, particularly girls.The Sherwood Forest golfer (pictured left) is a tireless volunteer – and winning the award has brought her new opportunities to make a difference on a bigger stage.“For people who want to go further in sport it can only help to open doors, to introduce them to people in the industry and give them a chance to make an impression,” said Emma.She is set to be a Young Ambassador for England Golf and was involved in the launch of the Plan for Children and Young People’s Golf. The 20-year-old university student was also invited to present the annual awards for the charity, the Golf Foundation.Emma, a member of the England Golf Youth Panel, uses the opportunities to encourage the older golfing community to consider the youth perspective – and to point out that what suits seven-year-olds doesn’t work for those in their late teens and early 20s!She has great memories of her win, remarking: “It was a massive honour.” And now, she’s keen to encourage nominations for the 2018 Awards. Tags: Award, England Golf Awards Click here for more details and to nominateImages copyright Leaderboard Photographylast_img read more

AH Tree Planting Honors Memory of Paul Boyd

first_imgATLANTIC HIGHLANDS — The borough honored the memory of environmentalist-historian Paul Boyd on Saturday, Oct. 22 with the planting of a tree in the Municipal Yacht Harbor.Shade Tree Commission Chairman Louise I. Donoghue presided over the ceremony that drew over 50 residents atthe base of the Colorado Blue Spruce planted at the entrance of the marina. A plaque in Boyd’s honor will installed at a later date.Among those speaking during the ceremony were formerMayor Peter E. Donoghue, borough Historical Society PresidentJoann Dellosso, Richard and Carolyn Campo Marcolus, Boyd’sfriend Victor Zak and Benson Chiles, representing the FrontPorch Club, who presented a check for $500 toward the purchase of the tree.The tree purchase was financed jointly by the Shade Tree Commission and the Front Porch Club, which applied funds from its annual Chilifest to the project.The planting is part of a commission program to honor local residents, past or present, for their efforts on behalf of the community.Boyd, who died earlier this year, was a long-time activist in the Historical Society, helping secure funding to refurbish the society’s museum, the Strauss Mansion, and he was society president at the time of his death.He was a founder and long-time chairman of the borough’s Environmental Commission and played a major role in the establishment of the town’s Lenape Woods Preserve and Monmouth County’s Popomora Park. Boyd also worked to acquire the financing to complete the Bayshore Trail. He also repeatedly demonstrated his commitment to a greener borough by orchestrating Earth Day observations and beach cleanups.Boyd also successfully documented the borough’s historic past, as author of his 2004 the book “Atlantic Highlands: From Lenape Camps to Bayshore Towns.”last_img read more

On A Wintry Day in RB, Soup is Super

first_imgGary Sable of That Hot Dog Place in Red Bank serves up some soup on a chilly afternoon in Red Bank recently. While soup is popular year-round, demand definitely rises when Old Man Winter comes to town. RED BANK — Bread may be the staff of life as the old proverb goes. But, boy, that cup of soup — especially on a cold day — can brighten a meal and a day.It was damp and rainy last Thursday afternoon as Andy Anderson ran into Readie’s 39 Broad Street, for a quick lunch. On his agenda that day, as it turns out most days, was a container of soup. “I don’t have a lot of time for lunch and it’s fast,” he said, and he likes the health benefits of eating soup for lunch. “I try to watch what I eat,” Anderson said.Red Bank has any number of locations that offer a variety of soups on any given day.“We sell a lot of soup year ’round, but this time of year, look around,” said Readie’s owner Tom Fishkin, as he scanned the small dining area, where indeed most of the customers on hand for a late lunch seemed to have soup containers in front of them and plastic spoons in their fists.Fishkin confided, “Our hope is they’ll eat it year ’round.”Readie’s, which recently moved on to Broad Streert after many years on Monmouth Street, prepares about four different soups daily. Among the four, he said, are two “regular” types, meaning “all purpose” usually chicken based, a vegetarian-style and a seafood-based. Selection. He offers one cream soup every day, “Because it’s popular,” Fishkin said.Though, not for Anderson. “I like anything that is not creamy,” he said. “I have to watch my diet.”Readie’s makes its own soups daily, with some of the most popular being turkey with wild rice and the traditional chicken noodle.The key to a good soup, Fishkin explained, is using “good, fresh ingredients,” and equally important, “Don’t rush it.”“Our soups are not complicated,” he said. “Most of the soups we make,  a conscientious homemaker can make it.”The key to success is familiarity. “When people go out for dinner they might be adventurous,” Fishkin said; but for lunch, when they have limited time, people stick to what they know.And the weather plays a role, too. “If I know it’s going to be a rainy day, I’ll have a chili,” he said. “It’s a natural.”“The weather definitely factors into it,” says Gary Sable, owner and operator of That Hot Dog Place/Soupmeister, located at Victorian Courtyard, 30 Monmouth Street.“If it’s a cold, rainy, nasty day you bring out your heavy hitters,” he said, which can be Italian wedding, chicken tortilla or spicy sausage. “People will always eat chicken noodle soup,” he stated matter-of-factly.And he would know, Sable has been operating his small take-out shop for 17 years, arriving before 5 a.m. to prepare his three-five soups daily. “Anyone who has the slightest bit of a sniffle, they want chicken soup.”His selections range from the traditional standard-bearers like chicken noodle to a vegetarian offering and “sometimes a weird one,” like a recent choice of chicken stroganoff  or oxtail soup to round out his menu of hot dogs and deli sandwiches.“You go light in the summer, and not just amount,” he adds. Though he does sell less soup in the warm weather, those he does sell tend to be the brothier types. “Cream soups, you can’t give them away in the summer.”But in the winter, “go heavy,” he says, meaning heartier soups and more of them.His favorite? “My favorite was the first soup I ever made: beef barley. It’s still my favorite. I make it all the time.”“Ingredients are the key,” he stressed. “It’s only as good as the ingredients. And it’s important not to be stingy.“It’s just as easy to make a pot of soup with three chickens in it as one.”He also offered a little secret, given him by his mother, for beef stock soups — shinbones. “It makes the best soups, it adds a lot of flavor.”Mike Tierney, who owns No Joe’s Café, 51 Broad Street, agreed that preparation is the key.“That goes for anything,” he said.“If you prepare properly, with all the right ingredients, that’s when you’re going to be a success,” he predicted.No Joe’s use to make its own soups on site for years but has since started having it delivered from Hale and Hearty, a New York City-based company, which does it better than he could, Tierney said.Some of the most successful selections at No Joe’s are chicken pot pie, and a new one, Senegalese chicken peanut, a tomato-based type. “It is phenomenal,” he insisted.He sells soup all year, although he sells more in the colder months. But even when it’s warm, “It always goes. I never throw it out.”And what’s great about soups, is you can experiment, add different ingredients to create a new variation. “It’s a great way to get through your inventory,” Tierney said. “You’re just throwing stuff in. But that’s how soups are made.”The appeal of soup is “comfort, biggest thing,” Sable summed up. Besides, “It’s healthy and inexpensive, and that’s important now.”“It’s certainly comfort food,” said Rob Atkinson, who has been coming to Sable’s for the 15 years he’s worked in Red Bank. “It gets you through the afternoon.”Sable swears by its healthfulness and rejuvenating powers “Did you ever see anyone who eats a lot of soup that’s fat?” asked the railthin Sable. “I eat soup every day and I’m not fat.”last_img read more

Mallard’s Source for Sports Team of the Week — Trafalgar Totems

first_imgRemember when the weather was warm and sunny? For those readers Mallard’s Source for Sports would like to take a trip down memory lane to the green grass fields to spotlight the Trafalgar Totems Fieldhockey squad as Team of the Week. The Totems, coached by none other than Jesse Anast, finished the junior season with great results. The team includes, back row, L-R, coach Jesse Anast, Emma Gregorich, Ali Zondervan, Kyra Burkart, Noelle Wang, Jacqueline Van Horne, Naiomi Perkins, Alyssa Hill and Caitlyn Maida. Front, Marley Reynolds, Taylor Zimmer, McKenna Bennet, Emma Wheeldon, Ashley Zarikoff, Anna Milde, Julia Burkart, Hanna Quinn and Olivia ReRevillia. The goalie is, Noa Butterfield.last_img read more

Smokies find talent in Kootenays, kick off season Saturday

first_imgThe 2012-13 roster also features Kootenay products Adam Wheeldon (Nelson), Joren Johnson (Shoreacres) and Brenden Heinrich (Kimberley); Wheeldon and Johnson are two of the eight returnees from 2011-12 headlined by new captain Garrett McMullen and starting goaltender Lyndon Stanwood.Trail will begin the season with only five of the requisite six overage spots filled with forwards McMullen, Brent Baltus, Tyler Berkholtz, Merrimack commit Alex Holland and defenseman Djordje Leposavic.Berkholtz and Holland both spent last season in the BCHL on Vancouver Island while Leposavic returns to his home province after playing Junior “A” in North Bay, Ontario last year.All 56 regular-season games will be broadcast live on FastHockey pay-per-view as well as through the Smoke Eaters’ Ustream channel.To find out more information on broadcast options, visit www.trailsmokeeaters.com. The Trail Smoke Eaters kick off the 2012-13 B.C. Hockey League season with a host of local talent Saturday at the Save-On Foods BCHL Showcase in Chilliwack against the Cowichan Valley Capitals.The Smokies will have three Greater Trail products to start the season: 16 year-old forward Mitchell Foyle (Fruitvale) and 17 year-old forward Jake Lucchini (Trail) both join the Smokies from the major midget Kootenay Ice, while fellow 17 year-old Trail product Scott Davidson moves up from the Junior “B” Beaver Valley Nitehawks.last_img read more

Uphill challenge, but Cats confident better days ahead on Female Hockey trail

first_img“We probably have the best goaltending in the province in Morgan Flynn from Castlegar and Salmo’s Lauren Biggs,” Fisher said.“Now we just have to find our scoring touch.”Once again the scoring touch deserted the Cats during the weekend.Despite having many good chances, Kootenay struggled around the net.Nelson’s Jesse Cooper tied the game for Kootenay after the Rockets opened the scoring in the second.Saturday, Cori-Anne Huisman of Fernie scored the only goal of the game for the Cats.“The girls really enjoy each other so I don’t think personality is going to be any kind of an issue going forward,” Fisher explained.“It’s just a matter of learning a new way to play the game from where they played before also the level of intensity that’s required . . . this league is a much more intense scenario for us.”The Female Midget AAA League was initiated in the 2007-2008 season in response to the membership’s desire to provide an opportunity for elite female hockey players to come together on zone teams to challenge other elite Female Midget teams.Kootenay, with players from Nelson, Nakusp, Trail, Rossland, Fruitvale, Fernie, Golden, Canal Flats, Salmo and Castlegar, remains at home this weekend when the Cats welcome Fraser Valley Fusion for a pair of games beginning Saturday in Kaslo.Saturday puck drop is 2:15 p.m.Sunday the game begins at 9:15 a.m. Kiana Karoyli scored in the third period to snap a 1-1 tie and spark the visiting Okanagan Rockets to a 2-1 victory over Kootenay Wildcats in B.C. Female AAA Hockey League action Sunday at the NDCC Arena.The win gave the Rockets a leg up on the Cats during the two-game set.The teams played to a 1-1 tie Saturday.“I think we have very young, enthusiastic team that works hard all the time,” said Kootenay head coach Cary Fisher following the tough loss Sunday.“You can see that from their play today . . . nobody gives up, everybody back checks.”“I think for us it’s just finding the right chemistry as a lot of girls haven’t played together so it’s going to take a little while for them to jell together,” Fisher adds.Kootenay is 2-3-1 on the season after the one-point weekend against the Rockets.Despite the loss Fisher is confident the Wildcats will be a force come the end of the season.last_img read more

BUENA VISTA STAKES QUOTES

first_imgGARY STEVENS, DIVERSY HARBOR, WINNER: “Kent chirped to his filly leaving the gate and I said ‘Good, somebody’s gonna put some pressure on La Tia.‘ I was working her last week and she did tremendous, she’s matured a lot; she’s push-button. She showed a nice kick; I can’t believe how much she’s matured. Like all good fillies, she’s got a mind of her own but she’s gotten more cooperative and I’ve gotten to know her a lot better with working her in the mornings. She’s turning into one of my favorites quickly.” TRAINER QUOTES JOCKEY QUOTES JOEL ROSARIO, LA TIA, SECOND: “She was going easy, even when that horse came to our outside, she was still comfortable. She did everything she could but we just got beat. We were second-best today.” AIMEE DOLLASE, ASSISTANT TO TOM PROCTOR, WINNER: “She’s maturing so much. That was excellent. He (Kent Desormeaux on Blingismything) did help her on the pace. That’s what she’s been lacking in a lot of her races, is pace up front, but she still closes really strong, so that definitely helped us today.“She had to run down a really nice filly. La Tia is a solid mare.” NOTES: The winning owner is Leonard Lavin of Ocala, FL, who races as Glen Hill Farm -30-last_img read more

Bask Magazine features History of Santa Anita

first_imgThe luxurious magazine titled, Bask, recently featured Santa Anita Park saying, “Few places in Southern California lore are as storied as Santa Anita Park, the premier racetrack in Arcadia with as much pedigree as the champion thoroughbreds that have famously run its course–and the Hollywood honchos who marked its heyday.” The article goes on to talk about the history of the park and the legendary moments that occurred here such as turning into an Army training center during World War II.  Here is the cover and the article.Via BaskMagazine.comlast_img read more