How Could Polar Dinosaurs Survive Freezing, Darkness?

first_imgNational Geographic News has a report about a new exhibit of dinosaur fossils that have been found in the northern and southern polar regions.  These unusual creatures had to survive not only the cold, but also, due to the effects of orbital mechanics, six months of darkness each year.  Intrepid explorers in south Australia, northern Canada, Patagonia, Alaska and Antarctica have braved the elements since the 1980s to find dinosaur bones in the extreme polar regions.  Their discoveries have changed our conceptions of dinosaur metabolism and the ecosystems in which they lived.  Polar dinosaurs include:Hypsolophodontids: “small, speedy, plant-eating dinosaurs that ran on two feet.”  They had large eyes, apparently adapted to low light levels, and bones that grew throughout the year, suggesting they were warm blooded.  The plants on which they fed apparently did not drop their leaves during the winter.A horned dinosaur named Serendipaceratops arthurcclarkei (no kidding) must have looked like something out of a sci-fi movie.  NG claims this is “one of the oldest horned, or frilled, dinosaurs known, which suggests that horned dinosaurs may have originated in the southern polar region.”A sauropod, possibly the largest found in Antarctica, is being analyzed.  It was found at 13,000 feet elevation.An allosaurus-like meat eater named Cryolophosaurus ellioti was 22 feet long.The exhibit at Seattle’s Burke Museum is called “Dinosaur of Darkness.”Throughout the world there are mysteries.  Fossils give silent evidence of a very different world in the past; a world with polar regions that must have supported lush plant life and rich ecologies of diverse plants and animals larger than those living today.  Large redwood stumps have also been found in the Arctic circle (see 03/22/2002 headline), and there are the legendary frozen mammoths of Siberia.    This article suggests that “the climate was warmer then than it is now,” but puzzles over the fact that these dinosaurs must have “endured months of darkness and temperatures that plunged below freezing.”  For plants to have supported herbivores and carnivores of this size near the poles, it would seem there must have been atmospheric conditions that evened out the lighting and temperature.    As for horned dinosaurs originating near the south pole, we laugh, ha ha, at this funny joke.(Visited 38 times, 1 visits today)FacebookTwitterPinterestSave分享0last_img read more

HC dismisses plea challenging cancellation of ‘atheist’ certificate

first_imgThe Punjab and Haryana High Court has dismissed a petition of a youth from Haryana who challenged the cancellation of his “atheist” certificate by the State government after it had been issued to him by a local official earlier. Justice Tejinder Singh Dhindsa, while dismissing the petition, observed that if the petitioner has chosen a path of an atheist and doesn’t believe in any caste or class, there would be no requirement in law for him to be issued a certificate to such effect.The court held that undoubtedly, the freedom of conscience under Article 25 of the Constitution encompasses in itself a freedom to an individual to take a view that he does not belong to any religion.Individual rights“The freedom conferred by Article 25 of the Constitution would also include a right of an individual to claim that he is an ‘atheist’. Just as a freedom of conscience confers a fundamental right to a citizen to entertain a particular religious belief, it equally confers a right on any other individual-citizen to express an opinion that he does not belong to any religion,” said the court.The petitioner, Ravi Kumar Atheist, had approached the court challenging the cancellation of the “atheist” certificate which was issued to him by the Naib Tehsildar, Tohana of district Fatehabad in Haryana. The certificate issued on April 29, 2019 certified that the petitioner was an atheist and does not belong to any caste, religion and does not believe in God. However, on May 4, 2019 the certificate was cancelled.The court said that even if any such certificate had been issued by the Naib Tehsildar concerned and the same was subsequently cancelled, it would be of no consequence.last_img read more

Maoists set fire to six trucks, three earth movers in Chhattisgarh

first_imgDays after two security camps were set up in Dantewada district, Maoists set ablaze six trucks and three earth movers at the National Mineral Development Corporation compound at Kirandul in the district. “The incident occurred at 11 a.m. at a construction site. The trucks belonged to a private contractor employed by the NMDC. Maoists fled the spot after setting the trucks ablaze,” said Sundarraj P., Deputy Inspector General of Police, South Bastar Range. The Maoists were feeling the heat after permanent security camps were set up in Potali and Chikpal in the district, he added. “This is their standard modus operandi to make their presence felt. This way, they try to boost the morale of tribals.”Stating that roads were being constructed in the area, Mr. Sundarraj said the security forces have launched a search operation. On November 12, the police had fired in the air to disperse a crowd of 500 villagers that descended on the Potali security camp to oppose it. A day later, the police claimed it held a “positive interaction” with those residing within the camp’s security perimeter. In June, the tribals forced the NMDC to stop operations at five iron ore mines at the Bailadila hills for six days, protesting against a mining proposal at a hill they consider sacred. Meanwhile, the Sukma police have gunned down two Maoists in the Chintagufa police station limits and recovered a hoard of arms and ammunitions, said a note from the police. Vanjam Bhima and Kawasi Soma, of the Jagargunda area committee, were part of a group that ambushed a police party. “The police fired in self-defence. The Maoists retreated into the forest and hills,” said the police.last_img read more

Social Media Housekeeping Tips for Nonprofits

first_imgIs it easy to find you on Twitter and Facebook? Include links to your profiles on your website, email newsletters, and staff email signatures. Always include a short description about your organization and a link back to your website in your social media profiles’ “about” section. Think about social media as a way to open the doors of your organization to new guests and friends. But unlike hosting guests at your home for an hour or two, social media is open to guests 24/7. Because of the constant accessibility of social media, keeping profiles tidy all the time is a must. Here are some tips and ideas for social media housekeeping that you can tackle right now:Your social media avatar/profile pictures should mesh with your nonprofit brand and be recognizable to fans of your cause. Consider creating a special page on your nonprofit website that is solely dedicated to visitors from social media. Don’t let replies and comments linger—use them as an opportunity to engage your community. Set up alerts to use social media as a listening platform: @ mentions, hashtags, keywords about your cause, etc. Start tracking and planning your organization’s tweets. Programs such as HootSuite, TweetDeck and Sprout Social can help you plan tweets in advance and monitor replies, mentions, and hashtags. Is your nonprofit’s Facebook profile picture just as good as your cover image? While this may be obvious, it’s worth stating that your Facebook profile picture will be seen more often than your cover image. Be consistent with your hashtags. One small typo could add your tweets to a hashtag conversation that you didn’t intend to join! Don’t forget to post pictures. Photos help your Facebook posts stand out on your fan’s news feeds. Use compelling images to make an emotional connection and engage more supporters with your cause. Encourage more likes, shares, and comments. More likes and shares increase the odds that your post will be seen by friends and friends of friends. Start analyzing the types of posts that get shared the most by exporting your Facebook insights and taking an hour or two to dive into the data.last_img read more

No Kitties or Puppies. HELP! (Step Two)

first_imgReview Step One In Step One of this two-part post, I shared my take on why this type of emotional candy works so well to raise money or recruit volunteers. I cited a reliable litmus test for photo impact—would you share it with your own family and friends, and would they “like” or share it? Here are some recommendations, with examples: For policy and intermediary organizations: Connect the dots between your work and the people who are the ultimate beneficiaries. If your organization is not an animal rescue or somehow directly related to puppies, kitties, or babies, these alternatives will be far more effective in helping you forge connections and motivate giving. Most important, they are authentic, relevant expressions, rather than manipulative clickbait. Organizations like yours have it even harder when building relationships and motivating action, be it giving or something else. That’s because your work is indirect. For all causes and organizations: Highlight the similarities between your audiences and your organization’s clients, participants, or beneficiaries. Get detailed and personal in words and/or photos. The close-up (bottom left) of the little girl focused on drawing is compelling! Clearly, we never want anyone to be homeless, much less our own family. The cause has the potential to scare off supporters because of their fear that it could happen to them. Stigma! However, by photographing an older resident (like your grandma or mine) reading to a couple of kids, Hope House busts through and connects us with the residents in a positive way. (I remember when my grandma read to me.) The Findlay-Hancock County Community Foundation does a great job of this on its Facebook page, as shown in the post above. Here, the foundation makes it easy to make the connection between its work and the individuals who benefit from its grants for a real “aha!” moment.center_img The details are what sticks (or doesn’t) and make your story memorable and more likely to be shared. How do you make your organization’s content compelling—beyond kitties, puppies, or babies? Please share your recommendations in the comments! You’re working on legislation related to a cause or supporting other cause organizations. This makes it challenging for prospects to connect emotionally. It takes your audience time and thought to make the connection between your impact and people, which is always a deterrent. Findlay Hope House does a great job of this on its Facebook page time and time again. Consider the post above, showing kids without homes living in Hope House’s transitional housing. But there is a great method of speeding that vital connection—make the message for your prospects and supporters. Connect the dots between your organization’s work and impact and your ultimate beneficiaries, even if there are layers in between. Okay, your organization is one of many that can’t use kitty or puppy photos to raise money or recruit volunteers. So what can you do to quickly and effectively connect with the emotions of prospects and supporters? Step 2: Make emotional connections and compelling content—if not candy—even without the supercute. Review Step One With refreshing practicality, Nancy Schwartz rolls up her sleeves to help nonprofits develop and implement strategies to build strong relationships that inspire key supporters to action. She shares her deep nonprofit marketing insights—and passion—through consulting, speaking, and her popular blog and e-news at GettingAttention.org.last_img read more

Nonprofit Love: A Music Playlist to Inspire You

first_imgSometimes nonprofit fundraisers and marketers need to take a deep breath and then…rock out. Ok maybe not “rock out,” but listening to music can help spark creativity, help you relax, or pump you up. I reached out to some of my nonprofit friends on Twitter and asked them what they listen to at work to get them “in the zone.” You can see who contributed song ideas in this Storify. Nonprofit Pros! Share with me: what’s your fave song to get you in the “zone” at work?— Liz Ragland (@lizragland) July 28, 2015 The responses were varied: some prefer quiet background music, others want something a little more groovy or fast paced. Whatever your music tastes might be, I think you’ll enjoy the playlist we crafted just for you! Ladies and gentlemen, meet the Nonprofit Love playlist. Thanks to everyone who answered my call for suggestions!last_img read more

How to Make the Most of Your Year-End Donors

first_imgThis is what we all know:  December is huge for individual giving.In 2014, Network for Good saw thirty-one percent of the year’s online giving happened in December, and 12% of the year’s gifts came in during the last 3 days of the year. There’s still time to reap the rewards of this last-minute activity. With all of the time, effort, and money you put into your final fundraising campaigns, make sure your get the most out of your year-end donors with these tactics:Create a Great ExperienceEach aspect of your campaign—and especially your donation page—should reinforce a supporter’s decision to give while making it quick and easy for them to complete their donation. This means all of your materials should echo your key fundraising messages and incorporate your nonprofit’s branding. Each part of your campaign should be an continuation of the conversation you’re having with your potential donors across all of your outreach channels.Offer Suggested Donation AmountsDonors are looking for cues for how much to donate. While they may have a number in mind, they’re not really sure what level will make an impact. In addition to letting donors fill in their own donation amount, give donors a shortcut by offering suggested giving amounts that take the guesswork out of how much to donate.By presenting defined choices, supporters have context on what might be considered a “low” amount vs. a higher end contribution. This not only makes it easier for your donors, these suggestions can actually motivate donors to give more. Showcase Recurring Giving OptionsIn your fundraising appeals and on your online donation pages, always include the option to make a recurring gift. Well-positioned recurring gifts give supporters a way to give every month for the next year, instead of just one year-end donation. This is a win-win situation for everyone involved—donors can give more over time and you have a steady stream of dependable funds. Attach giving levels, special perks, and impact descriptions to monthly gift tiers to make recurring giving a more attractive option. If you don’t have a donation page that will help you increase your average gift size and encourage monthly giving, it’s time to make a change. Get a personal tour of Network for Good’s donation pages today.Enable and Encourage Social SharingMake it easy for your donors to share your message and raise money on your behalf by giving them tools to share your message via social media and peer-to-peer fundraising tools. Include social sharing buttons on your donation confirmation and thank you pages, in your thank you letters, and in follow-up emails. Provide copy and paste or pre-programmed messages to allow your donors to easily spread the word. Since enthusiastic supporters are often your best spokespeople, let their passion create a wave of donations by teaching them how to set up a fundraising campaign with a peer-to-peer fundraising page.Collect the Data You’ll Need in 2016As you reach out to donors this giving season, set yourself up for success by tracking and recording your results along the way: from email open rates to donation history. You’ll learn what’s working and what’s not, and you’ll pave the way for a strong retention strategy because you’ll know exactly how you should talk to each type of donor that comes in the door. Your best bet is to have an easy-to-use donor management system in place to collect this information in December, which will enable you to quickly analyze and act on that information in January. Don’t have a donor management system that makes your life easier? We can help. Schedule a personal tour today.Have a Solid Donor Stewardship PlanTurn first-time or casual givers into repeat donors by sending them a warm, timely thank you letter, and then keep them up to date on the impact of their donation. Stay in touch so that they feel like a true part of your community and can relive the helper’s high over and over again. When donors know their gift was appreciated and made a difference, they’ll be more likely to give again. Of course, these efforts will also help you keep your current loyal donors devoted for years to come.last_img read more

Overcoming Obstacles to Sustainable Funding: What Nonprofits Need to Thrive

first_imgHow do you fund your mission?A healthy nonprofit has multiple sources of funding, including individual giving. Depending entirely on grants or public funding is risky, as either could be lost without any control on the part of the nonprofit. A robust fundraising program provides needed financial security, expands your community, and grows awareness for your cause.How do you make sure your fundraising is successful? The best way to get started is to sit down and create a plan.The Number One Indicator of Fundraising SuccessAccording to the Individual Donor Benchmark Report, which studies nonprofits with operating budgets under $2 million, the number one indicator of success is having a written fundraising plan.Nonprofits with a fundraising plan—even if they don’t end up using it—are more likely to be successful. Why? The act of planning—going through last year’s numbers, analyzing results, assessing your financial health and looking for growth areas—gives you a healthy foundation to grow your programs. It keeps you focused, helps you think critically about new fundraising ideas, and ensures your activities support your mission.Want more planning resources? Check out 8 Resources to Help with Fundraising Planning.We know that fundraising planning is important. So, are nonprofits listening?Network for Good recently surveyed 10,000 small to mid-sized nonprofits to learn more about how they depend on fundraising plans, and the results were fascinating, to say the least.Q1: Do you currently have a written, 12-month fundraising plan from which you are managing revenue-generating activities to balance your budget?On the surface, it seems like many nonprofits are already using fundraising plans. But what about those ones who aren’t?Q2: If you don’t have a fundraising plan, what is the leading factor that is hindering your ability to create and implement one?A lack of time is the leading factor preventing nonprofit managers from developing a written fundraising plan, followed by a lack of insights and strategic know-how.Of course, it takes more than just a fundraising plan to ensure success—the plan is just the beginning. Successful fundraising is predicated upon multiple factors: a written plan, an effective strategy and case for support, staff and board consistently implementing tasks, and technology to track and build donor relationships.Unfortunately that’s often a tall order in a small shop. Often understaffed and underfunded, how does a small nonprofit afford the time and strategic help needed to develop a plan and sustain their mission?A New Model for SuccessNetwork for Good has initiated a new strategy to help smaller nonprofits move to more diversified and sustainable fundraising. We have coupled access to a personal fundraising coach with simple, easy-to-use fundraising software to ensure small nonprofits can continue their mission and sustain funding for programs commonly dropped due to lack of funding.In particular, the software and coaching combination was designed to help small and medium-sized nonprofits accomplish everything they need to thrive, including:Engage their boards in fundraising activities.Craft compelling stories to reach donors’ minds and hearts.Plan a successful year-end fundraising campaign.Analyze data to better understand their donors and inform their plan.Sounds great, right? The question is, does this model of software and coaching really work?The short answer is YES.Participating nonprofits raised, on average, 27% more revenue without a net increase to their expenses.What’s a Personal Fundraising Coach?So, you may be familiar with Network for Good’s software: donor management (designed just for small nonprofits) and fully integrated campaign pages. But what about the personal fundraising coach?Participating nonprofits are matched with a fundraising expert who has experience within their cause area and whose expertise matches their unique needs and challenges. Organizations get the help they need when they need it, without the risk of hiring a full time fundraising professional.These individuals provide one-on-one strategic support in everything ranging from creating a 12-month fundraising plan to developing a successful event to crafting an effective appeal. Whatever individual challenges a nonprofit is currently facing, the coach is there to provide strategic guidance.Looking ForwardIn recent years, many small nonprofits have struggled to find ways to create a model for survival, let alone growth. Diversified funding, affordable yet effective tools, and the help of a personal fundraising coach have helped hundreds of nonprofits in the last year to build a more certain and sustainable future.Click here to talk to us. We’ll give you an overview of the software, strategy, and coaching that can help your organization thrive.last_img read more

The Current State of Pre-eclampsia/Eclampsia Prevention and Treatment

first_img ShareEmailPrint To learn more, read: Posted on August 5, 2016September 27, 2016By: Sharif Mohammed Ismail Hossain, Ending Eclampsia Deputy DirectorClick to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to email this to a friend (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window)The global impact of pre-eclampsia/eclampsiaThe Maternal Health Task Force’s most recent quarterly newsletter focused on pre-eclampsia/eclampsia and postpartum hemorrhage. And for good reason: they are the two leading causes of maternal deaths globally and deserve widespread attention.In Kenya and Nigeria, hypertensive disorders such as pre-eclampsia/eclampsia are the leading cause of pregnancy-related deaths. In Bangladesh, Pakistan and Ethiopia, hypertensive disorders are among the top three causes. But despite the high fatality rate, deaths from pre-eclampsia/eclampsia are entirely preventable. Early detection, diagnosis and treatment are crucial for preventing mortality due to pre-eclampsia/eclampsia.Pre-eclampsia is characterized by elevated blood pressure and increased protein in the urine after 20 weeks of pregnancy. A woman with pre-eclampsia can suffer from blurred vision, severe headaches and edema, and if her pre-eclampsia goes untreated, she has an increased risk of developing eclampsia, which can cause life-threatening seizures. Pre-eclampsia/eclampsia is also a risk factor for preterm and stillborn births, maternal kidney and liver problems and pre-eclampsia/eclampsia in future pregnancies.The gold standard of treatmentUse of magnesium sulphate, the safest and most effective treatment for eclamptic seizures, requires delivery of the baby and placenta. Not without challenges, magnesium sulphate is the gold standard for managing eclampsia. However, its use indicates that either a woman’s elevated blood pressure was not detected early enough, or that it was detected but not properly managed in order to prevent progression to eclampsia. Early, regular high-quality antenatal and postnatal care that includes blood pressure screening, urinalysis and close monitoring is crucial. If a woman has elevated blood pressure or excess protein in her urine, she should receive appropriate treatment that controls the blood pressure, reduces the severity of pre-eclampsia and prevents eclamptic seizures and stroke.The World Health Organization (WHO) recommends calcium supplementation in areas where dietary calcium intake is low or aspirin prophylaxis for women at risk of pre-eclampsia. To control high blood pressure, thereby reducing the likelihood of pre-eclampsia progressing to eclampsia, the WHO recommends antihypertensive drugs. Since pre-eclampsia/eclampsia can occur after delivery of the baby, the WHO also recommends that these treatments continue postpartum.Barriers to implementationWe know that these treatments work. We also know the difficulty of implementing interventions in low-resource settings and among hard-to-reach populations.While antihypertensive drugs are on most countries’ essential medicines lists, there may not be a dedicated budget line or supply chain mechanism that actually gets the drugs to the people who need them. Furthermore, many countries lack sufficient policies allowing primary facility providers to prescribe and dispense these treatments, and there may be a shortage of skilled providers who are knowledgeable about treatment methods and able to manage cases that require them.There are also cultural barriers, which some might argue are the most difficult to overcome. In many settings women do not trust health facility providers. When a problem occurs, women in some communities might first seek care from a traditional healer and only visit a health facility if the problem persists or worsens. Furthermore, women living in low-resource settings may not have the financial means to travel a long distance to a health facility, pay for services and drugs upon arrival and then pay for the return home.Looking toward the futureDespite these challenges, the international development and public health communities want to eliminate preventable maternal and newborn deaths and are dedicating funds to implementation research and advocacy. Clinical practice is more or less established in hospital settings worldwide. However, poor quality care inhibits early diagnosis, and national policies often restrict primary facility providers from prescribing and dispensing antihypertensive drugs. Ensuring that women with pre-eclampsia have access to necessary treatments is vital for preventing eclampsia and ultimately averting preventable maternal deaths.—For more information, please visit www.endingeclampsia.orgRead the most recent MHTF Quarterly highlighting pre-eclampsia/eclampsia.Learn more about pre-eclampsia/eclampsia on the MHTF website.Share this:last_img read more