Must-know Neuro-Nudges for Nonprofits

first_imgNetwork for Good is hosting a free webinar this Thursday, March 14 at 1 p.m. ET on neuromarketing – a topic definitely worth your time!The urge to help and give is hard-wired into the human brain. As a champion for a cause, it’s your task to tap into those recesses by appealing to that urge. The simplest things – images, words, gestures, even type fonts – can have a major effect on the potency of your message. Neuromarketing expert, Roger Dooley, has discovered some brain-science-based tweaks you can make to your print, web, and in-person outreach that will boost the effectiveness of your marketing efforts. Join Roger Dooley for this free event as he makes neuromarketing easy for nonprofits. Register here.last_img read more

4 ways to create a culture of giving at your nonprofit

first_imgThe following post is a summary of Adam Grant’s presentation on his book Give and Take: A Revolutionary Approach to Success at the Conference on Volunteering and Service.In Give and Take, Adam Grant’s premise is that there is more to the secret of success than hard work, talent and luck – especially as the world continues to become more hyper-connected. What’s missing is generosity. Givers excel in a collaborative work environment, but can burn out easily if they don’t see the impact of their contributions or don’t learn how to set boundaries. This is especially true for people in helping professions such as nonprofit leadership, cause marketing and social responsibility.Here are Adam’s 4 tips for creating a cultures of successful givers at your organization.1. Get the right people on the bus (a nod to Jim Collins)Weed out the takers and encourage matches to take their cues from the givers. Rewarding giver behavior and helping matchers see the value in reciprocity with a net positive benefit will nudge your culture towards a collaborative, generous workplace.2. Reduce costsThink about the power of 5-minute favors. You don’t have to be Mother Theresa or Gandhi to call yourself a giver. Giver mentality is more about finding efficient ways to make low-cost gestures with high value to the receiver. You’ve heard of micro-volunteering? Think of it as micro-favors. If someone asks you for help and you know you are the best equipped to help and the act will only take you 5 minutes, say yes. Always. If you are not the best equipped to respond, point the person in a new direction to find the help they need.3. Show impactSome givers burn out others are energized by doing favors – why? Givers burn out when they can’t see the value of their impact. Think of ways to have authentic messengers demonstrate the value your staff creates every day. A message from the CEO is nice, but givers are more motivated by a thank you from a program beneficiary or an employee who gave in a personally meaningful way. Showing impact in a tangible way relates to the concept of the ‘identifiable victim’ or ‘singularity effect’ – people are more compassionate when they can relate to one person’s story.4. Encourage help-seekingA whopping 75-90% of helping starts with a request, yet people hesitate to ask for help – especially givers. Givers don’t want to be a burden and often confuse taking and receiving. We need to create work cultures that reward asking for help and make it ok for people to take it. Also, givers to ask for help so other people (namely matchers) have the opportunity to give and so givers know who can benefit from their help and how in the future.Here’s an example of how help-seeking improves results. Appletree Answers, a call center solutions provider, was experiencing 98% staff turnover each year. That’s a huge HR hiring burden to replace your staff every year. The company started internal employee wish program where employees could ask for help fulfilling their dreams and other employees could offer assistance to making those wishes come true. As a result of creating this culture of giving and receiving, staff turnover dropped to 33%.Your organization can create its own Reciprocity Ring. Here’s how.· Invite employees to join the program.· Have everyone participating make a request.· Everyone in the program then tries to help make those requests happen.· Everyone is both a giver and a receiver, so there is no stigma about asking for help.· Everyone gets better understanding of the resources in their network for future giving and receiving. by Kate Olsen, VP of Strategic Projects at Network for Good @Kate4Goodlast_img read more

Hey Girl, I See What Your Nonprofit Is Doing

first_imgBy tapping into the #tigerblood hashtag, Zachary reported that tons of media outlets picked up on the story, resulting in a modest increase in blood donations.So what’s in it for you? Why should you consider making a meme? 1. Sure, memes can be just plain silly and fun, and but they can also humanize your nonprofit’s public image. Who doesn’t love an organization that embraces its humanity and sense of humor? 2. Memes can create connections and start conversations because of their two-prong premise: A meme is based on an aspect of popular culture and spread from person to person. 3. Memes give supporters an easy way to publicize and promote your cause. Once you create a meme, fans can quickly share it over email, social media, and their own websites.Want to create your own nonprofit meme to help build buzz for your cause? Check out our tips on using memes to spread your nonprofit’s message. (Image credit: National Wildlife Federation, Source: Avi Kaplan) You’ve seen them all over Facebook, YouTube, Tumblr, and Pinterest: grumpycats,talking babies, even Ryan Gosling. Entertaining memes have exploded across the Internet. But have you also noticed an uptick in charitable memes, memes that are doing good? Many nonprofits are capitalizing on the popularity of memes to gain visibility and connect with new supporters.Nonprofits aren’t always great at piggybacking on the work of others, but that’s the key for a meme to take off. Senior Strategist Avi Kaplan of RAD Campaign has compiled some tip-top examples of nonprofit memes that worked because they borrowed a cultural phenomena, as did tech writer Zachary Sniderman.One of the best examples of nonprofit meme-jacking came from a 132-year-old organization, the American Red Cross. Capitalizing on Charlie Sheen’s 2011 outburst and proclamation to have drank tiger’s blood, the American Red Cross tweeted:We may not collect #tigerblood, but we know our donors & volunteers have fierce passion for doing good! #RedCrossMonth— American Red Cross (@RedCross)last_img read more

Resources and inspiration for the next 90 days

first_imgWhere does the time go? There are just ninety days left until the end of the year. This means that you’re probably putting the final touches on your year-end fundraising plans and have a solid campaign ready to go. Not so much? First, don’t panic. There’s still plenty of time to create a solid plan and get the most out of the year-end giving season. Take a deep breath, then carve out some time to review your goals and start honing your campaign materials. Here at Network for Good, we recently published two free fundraising guides that can help you plan your marketing efforts and create a great appeal. You can download them here (registration required): How to Make the Case for Giving 7 Steps to Your Best Nonprofit Marketing Plan EverSecond, surround yourself with inspiration and smart advice. Our goal is to supply both with this blog, and here are a few of our favorites to add to your list:Future Fundraising Now: No-nonsense practical advice from Jeff Brooks, one of our favorite fundraising gurus.Sasha Dichter’s Blog: Big thoughts on giving from the mastermind behind Generosity Day.Sea Change Strategies: Alia and Mark offer simply brilliant thoughts on nonprofit storytelling, effective appeals, strategic planning, and everything in between.Fundraiser Grrl: When you need a laugh, Fundraiser Grrl totally gets it.For more inspiration, check out the Nonprofit Boot Camp and Social Media for Nonprofits conference happening on October 10 & 11 in San Francisco. Our friends at Social Media for Nonprofits have put together some great workshops to help your organization be the best it can be. There’s still time to register, and you can save $20 off with the code “N4G”.last_img read more

How to Use Your Data to Get Closer to Supporters & Prospects

first_imgReach Broader to Fine-Tune Messages, Channels, and TimingDon’t stop with your donor database. Your organization will find equally valuable insights in sources as like your email system, volunteer database, Facebook and Twitter analytics, and online survey findings.These sources provide priceless clues about donor habits. The most reliable way to reach your donors or prospects will always be:Where they already are (For example, in their email inboxes or Facebook accounts).At the times and on the days they tend to be there (when they open or click emails, sign your online petition, or retweet a recent tweet from your organization).You can also use these sources to sharpen your insights into your donors’ passions and values, so you can ensure your campaigns reach and resonate with them. For example, use your volunteer data to find out: How many current or recent donors were volunteers first (and whether they still are or not)? If there’s a significant percentage of donors who entered the organization as volunteers:Consider launching a donor recruitment campaign to current volunteers that features profiles of existing donors who are or were volunteers.If you need to build your volunteer corps, cross-promote those opportunities to similar donors who are not current volunteers.When it comes to data, there’s SO much power in the information that’s already at your fingertips. I can’t wait to hear what you do with it! As a fundraiser, one of the toughest parts of your job is finding (and keeping) loyal donors. This is an especially difficult task in the face of uncertain economic times. Mix in our crazy presidential election ramp up, and you’re left with a foolproof recipe for widespread anxiety and skepticism.I know that these barriers are hard to transcend, but there is a way to build deep and lasting connections with your targeted donors and prospects. And that way is paved with data that you already have. Let me tell you what I mean.Use Giving to Date to Shape Your Future Approach The easiest place to start is with what you already know. Dig into your donor database and focus on donors from the last two years, especially those who are high-ticket givers or have given three or more years in a row.  Retaining these folks is your absolute priority!Don’t have a donor database that can get the job done? Learn more about Network for Good’s newest product for small to mid-sized nonprofits: a donor management system that has everything you need and nothing you don’t. Learn more.Next, look for trends or patterns to help you deliver the strongest possible ask to each donor (or, more realistically, to small groups of donors). Here are two questions you can answer with data you’re likely to have on hand:What do your monthly donors look like? Get a clear picture of your monthly donors, especially those who are newly committed to monthly giving. These folks are loyal and most likely to become long-term supporters.See if other prospects share some of the same characteristics, and then launch a campaign to convert them into monthly donors. Who’s made a significantly larger gift than ever before within the last six months?Make a personal thank you calls (a personal note otherwise), and ask what spurred the latest gift. There may be more donors about to experience the same situation and likely to respond to a focused ask. Plus, these folks may be ripe for major gift prospecting.last_img read more

Developing World Gains Open Access to Science Research, but Hurdles Remain

first_imgPosted on November 2, 2012August 15, 2016Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to email this to a friend (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window)Recently, the Guardian’s Global Development Network posted an article, Developing world gains open access to science research, but hurdles remain, that describes the rise in commitments from various groups to ensure that their research is openly accessible to all. The article also explores the many persistent barriers to increasing open access publications around the world.From the story:These are heady days for supporters of open access (OA), who argue that the results of publicly-funded research should be made freely available to all, not just those who can afford subscriptions to the scientific journals in which they are published.Earlier this year, the World Bank announced that it would adopt an open access policy for all its research outputs and “knowledge products”, which will be entered into a central repository to be made freely accessible on the internet.Last month, the British government said that, in future, it will require all the research it funds in British universities to be made openly accessible, with authors paying publishers a fee (funded out of research grants) to make this possible – a position already adopted by the influential Wellcome Trust. The move was rapidly followed by an announcement from the European commission that the same rule will apply to all commission-funded research.The UK’s Department of International Development recently announced all its research will be made freely available. And publishers such as BioMed Central are pioneering open access journals in developing regions such as Africa.Read the full story here.Share this: ShareEmailPrint To learn more, read:last_img read more

ICASA 2013: Now More Than Ever, Targeting Zero

first_img ShareEmailPrint To learn more, read: Posted on July 1, 2013May 19, 2017Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to email this to a friend (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window)An expected 10,000 delegates will soon gather in Cape Town, South Africa for the International Conference on AIDS and STIs in Africa (ICASA). The conference, with the theme of Now more than ever: targeting zero, will be held from December 7-11, 2013. The final day to submit an abstract for review is July 5th, 2013.About the conference:Reflecting the conference theme “Now More Than Ever: Targeting Zero” and UNAIDS “Getting to zero” mantra of zero new HIV infections, zero discrimination and zero AIDS-related deaths, HIV prevention will be an important feature of this year’s ICASA plenary sessions.Starting at the very beginning of the HIV prevention spectrum, Dr Chewe Luo, Senior Advisor on HIV and AIDS at UNICEF, will present cutting edge strategies for the elimination of Mother-to-Child transmission (MTCT) in Africa. Shifting focus to youth Emmanuel Etim, the young and dynamic Project Co-ordinator of the African Union Youth Volunteer Corps, will in part address the road ahead for African youth to reach zero new HIV infections.Professor Christine Katlama, Head of the AIDS Unit, Department of Infectious Diseases at the renowned Pitié-Salpêtrière Hospital in Paris, will look at the long-term complications of living with HIV, including the impact that HIV drug resistance has on prevention efforts.UNFPA’s Senior Advisor on HIV, Ms. Bidia Deperthes, will provide the broadest overview of Africa’s current effective prevention programmes and tools…Read more here.Learn about the five conference tracks.Review the abstract submission guidelines.Take a look at the key conference dates.Stay tuned on Twitter at @icasaconference.Visit the general conference site.The Maternal Health Task Force is currently coordinating a blog series on maternal health, HIV, and AIDS. To view the series, click here.For additional information about maternal health, HIV, and AIDS, visit our topic page.If you are interested in sharing a guest blog post for our series on maternal health, HIV, and AIDS, please contact Kate Mitchell (kmitchel@hsph.harvard.edu) or Samantha Lattof (slattof@hsph.harvard.edu).Share this:last_img read more

Quality of Care for Maternal and Child Health: An Interview With Dr. Zulfi Bhutta

first_img ShareEmailPrint To learn more, read: Posted on October 16, 2014August 10, 2016Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to email this to a friend (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window)The maternal health community has made great strides towards improving the health of women and newborns around the world, but as global efforts have scaled up interventions quickly, the Maternal Health Task Force (MHTF) has often paused to consider the quality of this work.To evaluate this, Ana Langer and Anne Austin from the MHTF joined experts from around the world to create the Quality of Care in Maternal and Child Health supplement, published by the Reproductive Health Journal in September, 2014.Three of the five articles in the supplement have been highly accessed, which demonstrates high interest in quality of care in the community and untapped momentum that may be used to fill the identified research gaps.We talked to Dr. Zulfi Bhutta, lead researcher for the series, and asked him a few questions about the research process and how we as the maternal health community should move forward with the results.Q: What prompted the research team to take on the systematic reviews that make up the series?Despite recent progress, about 273,500 women died of maternal causes in 2010.  Furthermore, the share of neonatal deaths among all under-five children increased from about 36% in 1990 to 44% in 2012. These deaths have occurred disproportionately in low-income countries or among the disadvantaged in high- and middle-income countries. It is particularly acute where access to and utilization of skilled services for childbirth and newborn care is lowest.Evidence shows that poor quality of care for these women and newborns is a major factor for their elevated morbidity and mortality rates. Understanding underlying factors that impact the quality of maternal and newborn health (MNH) services and assessing the effectiveness of interventions at various health care delivery levels is crucial.The collection assesses and summarizes findings from systematic reviews on the impact of various approaches to quality of care improvements. The focus was two-fold: identify the evidence base and information gaps and assess approaches that enable health providers to adopt and implement patient-centered, evidence-based interventions that improve quality of care during childbirth and immediately after.Q: What gap does this series fill?This series systematically reviews the evidence of interventions aimed at improving care at the community, district and facility level. It also highlights knowledge gaps, especially in low- and middle-income countries (LMICs). The gaps point to priority research questions to pursue to improve quality of care in these settings.The findings can help governments, stakeholders and donors to form policies and develop health care models applicable to various levels of healthcare. This could enable community- and facility-based health care providers and district-level program managers to implement patient-centered, evidence-based interventions, which will improve childbirth and postpartum quality of care delivery.Q: Which result stood out most?At the community level, packaged care involving home visitation, outreach services, community mobilization, referrals, women’s support groups and community health worker and traditional birth attendants training showed improvements in MNH outcomes.Mid-level health worker (MLHW) based care not only demonstrated outcomes comparable to routine non-MLHW care delivery but also showed better results for some outcomes. At the district level, user-directed financial strategies—especially conditional cash transfers and voucher schemes—increased MNH service utilization. District level supervision also found positively influenced provider’s practice, knowledge and awareness. At the facility level, in-service training, standardized or individualized social support programs and continuity of specialized midwifery care throughout pregnancy, labor and the postnatal period have the potential to improve perinatal, maternal, and labor specific indicators.The findings demonstrate that community-based improvement interventions have been widely assessed for MNH outcome effectiveness in LMICs. However, many district- and facility-level interventions have been evaluated mainly in high-income country settings. Given the differences in low-, middle-, and high-income county healthcare infrastructure and systems, findings across countries in district- and facility-based care are not generalizable. There is also an information gap on the effectiveness of these interventions on different subgroups that may represent within-country disparities. Few of the studies provided evidence on sustainability and scale up.  Generating evidence on the sustainability of proven interventions—including implementation feasibility and scale up in various settings in countries with constrained resources and weak health systems—is needed.Q: What is the series’ biggest take-away?In addition to the effectiveness of specific quality improvement interventions on MNH, as I mentioned above, there is a dearth of evidence on district- and facility-level interventions, particularly those specific to quality of maternal health and MNH outcomes. Further evidence is needed to evaluate the best combination of strategies.Q: Given the research gaps you’ve identified, what are the priority areas for future research?Future research in LMICs should focus on factors affecting interventions’ sustainability and cost-effectiveness when scaled up. District- and facility-level interventions—including social support, specialized midwifery teams and staff skills mix—have proven to improve MNH outcomes in high-income countries; we need further research on implementation feasibility in low-resource settings. We also need qualitative data describing the individual components of interventions for reproducibility, which would make the interventions invaluable for scale up and sustainability in low-resource settings. Strengthening health information systems, one of the strategies that evaluate interventions’ effectiveness over a time period, should be established in LMICs. Further evidence is now needed to evaluate the best possible combination of strategies and healthcare models to suit specific groups.Share this:last_img read more

Jobs and Scholarships in Maternal Health

first_imgPosted on December 5, 2014December 3, 2015Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to email this to a friend (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window)Check out the following opportunities in Maternal HealthJobsResearch Fellow in Qualitative Methods for Impact Evaluation, London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine, Deadline: Thursday, December, 18thResearch Fellow in Epidemiological Methods for Impact Evaluation, London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine, Deadline: Thursday, December, 18thSenior Program Officer, Program Advocacy and Communications for Family Planning, Bill & Melinda Gates FoundationMonitoring and Evaluation Officer, PATH (based in South Africa)Communications Associate, Mobile Alliance for Maternal ActionProject Director for Fistula Care Plus, EngenderHealth ShareEmailPrint To learn more, read: Urban Health Conference ScholarshipSpecial Call for RMNCH Submissions for 12th International Conference on Urban Health, March 8-12, Dhaka, Bangladesh. Deadline: Friday, January 9th, 2015Scholarships are available for applicants from developing countries whose abstracts are accepted for presentationAreas of special interest include addressing disparities in access to maternal, newborn, and child health services, quality of services, and programs that target youth sexual and reproductive health behaviors to prevent unintended pregnancy. Abstracts that address reproductive, maternal, neonatal and child health (RMNCH) in the urban environment, especially approaches that target poor women and women living in slums are encouraged.Questions? Contact Dr. Selmin Jahan, selmin@eminence-bd.orgSubmit your abstract at www.icuh2015.orgShare this:last_img read more

5 New Year Resolutions Every Fundraiser Should Make

first_imgYou know what takes a lot of inspiration and a truckload of guts?  Fundraising.I learned this the hard way when I started a nonprofit in the living room of my apartment with just $500 and a credit card.  There were days when I second guessed myself but ten years later we raised over 10 million dollars and have been featured on Oprah, CNN, and the Today show.  Last year, Girlstart turned 20.  I’ve learned a lot since then, including how to get the absolute best fundraising results in the shortest possible time using scientifically proven methods.So what tips do I have for you to make 2018 your best year ever?  Lots!  Are you ready to ring in the new year raising more?  Here are 5 New Year resolutions I want EVERY fundraiser to make:1. Resolve to learn more about your donors.Why did they give to your organization – what connected to them? What programs do they care about?  What motivated them to give in the first place?  What was the best gift they ever gave and why?  Of all the organizations they support which one does the best job engaging them?  What are their top three philanthropic priorities?  What do they love about what they do?  How do they prefer to be communicated with?  You can ask some of these questions when you call them to thank them just for being a donor and others in a visually rich donor survey.2. Resolve to learn from your data.Do you know what your donor retention rate is? If you don’t know how you’re currently performing, setting goals to improve is meaningless. You can examine retention overall or narrow it down to first-time donors and/or major donors. You can calculate retention by the number of donors or gift value.  I personally recommend examining by gift value so you know exactly what your retention rate is costing your organization.  To run your numbers, decide on your 12 month date range (a calendar year or your fiscal year) and add the donor gift amounts by annual “class” i.e. the class of major donors giving $1,000 or more in 2017 (or the class of all 1st time donors in 2017) and then divide that amount by what those same donors gave to you the previous year, in 2016.  In other words, if you had 1,000 first time donors in 2016 and only 200 of those made another gift in 2017 your new donor retention rate would be 20%.  Why does retention matter so much?  Acquiring those donors cost you money, time and effort.  As Roger Craver, author of Retention Fundraising, advises, “Taking actionable steps to reduce donor losses is the least expensive way to increase your fundraising income.”3. Resolve to make your donors FEEL something.This is one of my biggest pet peeves in fundraising. Giving is such a joyous experience but so much of our communications can feel bland and lifeless. Does your appeal or acknowledgment make your donor feel great about themselves? It should. What we feel is irrelevant. What our donors feel is the only thing that matters. While we’re busy trying to educate our donors, or boasting about how awesome our programs are, our donor might be tossing our letter in the trash. Communicate in a warm, friendly, personable tone. Make the donor feel like gushing over what they made possible. If your autoresponders sound like a robot wrote them, it’s time for a rewrite in 2018!4. Set a revenue goal for every donor in your portfolio.Base your appeal goals on your donor’s capacity, inclination, prior giving, and interests.  Now you’re ready for your best fundraising year ever!  What’s more, when your CEO walks in and tells you about a budget shortfall you’ve got solid ground to push back on unrealistic goals.5. Resolve to dedicate 30 minutes a day to call and personally thank donors.Don’t start with the biggest and then fall off the wagon on this goal come February.  If you can, include new donors to your call list.  Be prepared with a few great discovery questions and opportunities for them to engage with you deeper.  Before you know it, your lower level donors will be major gift prospects.  The secret is you have to STICK WITH IT.  Put it on your calendar as a recurring appointment when your energy levels are at their peak.  Don’t forget to smile while you’re talking or leaving a message.I’d love to share more of my secrets with you – Download the NFG Masterclass Webinar Fundraising Strategy Series with “The Secrets of High Performing Fundraisers”.  Want more help?  I have OODLES of guides to make your fundraising EASIER.Here’s to 2018!Learn more about our guest blogger:Rachel Muir, CFRE transforms individuals into confident, successful fundraisers through workshops and retreats.  When she was 26 years old, Rachel Muir launched Girlstart, a non-profit organization to empower girls in math, science, engineering and technology in the living room of her apartment with $500 and a credit card.  Several years later she had raised over 10 million dollars and was featured on Oprah, CNN, and the Today show. Learn more about Rachel at www.rachelmuir.com or follow her at facebook.com/rachelmuirfundraising and on Twitter @rachelmuir.last_img read more

Family Planning and Maternal Health: Four Takeaways From the 2016 International Conference on Family Planning

first_imgPosted on February 26, 2016October 12, 2016By: Jacquelyn Caglia, Deputy Director of Administration & Operations, Women and Health Initiative, Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public HealthClick to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to email this to a friend (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window)The 2016 International Conference on Family Planning, convened in Nusa Dua, Indonesia in late January, brought together more than 3,000 researchers, practitioners, policymakers, donors, and advocates. If you weren’t able to participate, here are four important takeaways those of us working in maternal health need to know.Family planning and maternal health are inextricably linked, and our communities of practice must be too. Each day, more than 800 women die from preventable causes related to pregnancy and childbirth. Many of these deaths could be avoided if women had access to contraception to prevent unwanted pregnancy and increase the amount of time between pregnancies. Family planning must be an essential part of antenatal and postnatal care, and a conversation about contraception should be part of any clinical encounter with women of reproductive age.Various factors affect discontinuation of contraception. Nearly 30% of women who stop using contraception for reasons other than wanting to get pregnant cite concerns related to health service quality including lack of method choice, stock-outs, and ineffective referral systems. Quality matters across the reproductive, maternal, newborn and child health (RMNCH) continuum.Young adolescents bear the biggest burden of complications during pregnancy and childbirth, the second leading cause of death globally among girls aged 15-19. Delaying the age of first pregnancy would reduce maternal and newborn mortality as well as improve the health and well-being of young girls.Improved tracking is needed. USAID and UNFPA have called for a new indicator to be added to monitor progress towards Goal 3 of the Sustainable Development Goals, to ensure healthy lives and promote well-being for all ages. In the words of Ellen Starbird of USAID, the new measure – percent of demand satisfied by modern contraception – is “a measure of what women are doing, rather than what women should be doing.” ShareEmailPrint To learn more, read: To read more reflections from the 2016 International Conference on Family Planning, visit the ICFP2016 Crowd360 digital hub.Share this:last_img read more

The Current State of Pre-eclampsia/Eclampsia Prevention and Treatment

first_img ShareEmailPrint To learn more, read: Posted on August 5, 2016September 27, 2016By: Sharif Mohammed Ismail Hossain, Ending Eclampsia Deputy DirectorClick to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to email this to a friend (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window)The global impact of pre-eclampsia/eclampsiaThe Maternal Health Task Force’s most recent quarterly newsletter focused on pre-eclampsia/eclampsia and postpartum hemorrhage. And for good reason: they are the two leading causes of maternal deaths globally and deserve widespread attention.In Kenya and Nigeria, hypertensive disorders such as pre-eclampsia/eclampsia are the leading cause of pregnancy-related deaths. In Bangladesh, Pakistan and Ethiopia, hypertensive disorders are among the top three causes. But despite the high fatality rate, deaths from pre-eclampsia/eclampsia are entirely preventable. Early detection, diagnosis and treatment are crucial for preventing mortality due to pre-eclampsia/eclampsia.Pre-eclampsia is characterized by elevated blood pressure and increased protein in the urine after 20 weeks of pregnancy. A woman with pre-eclampsia can suffer from blurred vision, severe headaches and edema, and if her pre-eclampsia goes untreated, she has an increased risk of developing eclampsia, which can cause life-threatening seizures. Pre-eclampsia/eclampsia is also a risk factor for preterm and stillborn births, maternal kidney and liver problems and pre-eclampsia/eclampsia in future pregnancies.The gold standard of treatmentUse of magnesium sulphate, the safest and most effective treatment for eclamptic seizures, requires delivery of the baby and placenta. Not without challenges, magnesium sulphate is the gold standard for managing eclampsia. However, its use indicates that either a woman’s elevated blood pressure was not detected early enough, or that it was detected but not properly managed in order to prevent progression to eclampsia. Early, regular high-quality antenatal and postnatal care that includes blood pressure screening, urinalysis and close monitoring is crucial. If a woman has elevated blood pressure or excess protein in her urine, she should receive appropriate treatment that controls the blood pressure, reduces the severity of pre-eclampsia and prevents eclamptic seizures and stroke.The World Health Organization (WHO) recommends calcium supplementation in areas where dietary calcium intake is low or aspirin prophylaxis for women at risk of pre-eclampsia. To control high blood pressure, thereby reducing the likelihood of pre-eclampsia progressing to eclampsia, the WHO recommends antihypertensive drugs. Since pre-eclampsia/eclampsia can occur after delivery of the baby, the WHO also recommends that these treatments continue postpartum.Barriers to implementationWe know that these treatments work. We also know the difficulty of implementing interventions in low-resource settings and among hard-to-reach populations.While antihypertensive drugs are on most countries’ essential medicines lists, there may not be a dedicated budget line or supply chain mechanism that actually gets the drugs to the people who need them. Furthermore, many countries lack sufficient policies allowing primary facility providers to prescribe and dispense these treatments, and there may be a shortage of skilled providers who are knowledgeable about treatment methods and able to manage cases that require them.There are also cultural barriers, which some might argue are the most difficult to overcome. In many settings women do not trust health facility providers. When a problem occurs, women in some communities might first seek care from a traditional healer and only visit a health facility if the problem persists or worsens. Furthermore, women living in low-resource settings may not have the financial means to travel a long distance to a health facility, pay for services and drugs upon arrival and then pay for the return home.Looking toward the futureDespite these challenges, the international development and public health communities want to eliminate preventable maternal and newborn deaths and are dedicating funds to implementation research and advocacy. Clinical practice is more or less established in hospital settings worldwide. However, poor quality care inhibits early diagnosis, and national policies often restrict primary facility providers from prescribing and dispensing antihypertensive drugs. Ensuring that women with pre-eclampsia have access to necessary treatments is vital for preventing eclampsia and ultimately averting preventable maternal deaths.—For more information, please visit www.endingeclampsia.orgRead the most recent MHTF Quarterly highlighting pre-eclampsia/eclampsia.Learn more about pre-eclampsia/eclampsia on the MHTF website.Share this:last_img read more

Improving Quality of Care is the Most Powerful Means to End Preventable Maternal Deaths

first_img ShareEmailPrint To learn more, read: Posted on December 28, 2017January 2, 2018By: Pompy Sridhar, India Director, MSD for MothersClick to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to email this to a friend (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window)Many would assume that the 45,000 mothers dying in India every year during childbirth is a result of complications that are difficult to manage. It should be rather surprising that these deaths are mostly preventable. In fact, one of the main reasons for losing lives is often due to sub-standard and inconsistent quality of care.Our entire maternal health care community is aware of this. And yet, improving the quality of maternal health services has been a tough challenge in India, largely due to insufficient tools and incentives for providers to change.In recent years, considerable efforts to improve the quality of institutional care during the antenatal, delivery and postpartum periods have favored public health care facilities, largely excluding private ones. This has been the case despite the fact that private providers in India account for up to 30% of institutional deliveries in rural areas and up to 52.5% of institutional deliveries in urban areas, and despite evidence suggesting that quality of care is an issue in both sectors. Many such facilities, even those that have been in business for 5 to 10 years and even longer, have been found not to be following recognized, evidence-based quality standards of care in their labor and delivery wards. They do not have the necessary emergency protocols in place to prevent complications.These challenges persist due to a widespread lack of technical resources, insufficient training and other opportunities for nurses and paramedics to update their skills and knowledge (leading to continued use of outdated, ineffective and sometimes harmful practices); weak incentives for private maternity facilities to invest in quality improvement because efforts typically do not immediately translate into an increased client base; and limited capacity (if not total absence) of systems to measure and monitor the quality of their services.Greater efforts must be made to bridge the gap between research-supported knowledge and clinical practice. What we need is a large scale streamlined quality improvement initiative, offering a practical and compelling way for private health care facilities to improve their capacities for managing care during labor, delivery and the immediate postpartum period, when risks for life threatening complications are the highest.An intervention which offers all of the above is an important step forward for maternal health in India. One such example that comes to mind is a recently published white paper on the Private Sector Quality Improvement Initiative undertaken by FOGSI in partnership with Jhpiego and MSD for Mothers that offers some path breaking insights. The pilot program was implemented over a period of three years (2013–2016) in 11 large cities in the states of Jharkhand and Uttar Pradesh: Agra, Allahabad, Bokaro, Dhanbad, Giridih, Jamshedpur, Kanpur, Lucknow, Meerut, Ranchi and Varanasi. Its primary objective was to improve the quality of care provided by private maternity providers through implementation of quality standards, and strengthen the clinical competency of private maternity providers. After five rounds of assessments, 122 out of 140 participating facilities (87%) achieved a 70% score or better, compared to only 3% of facilities in the beginning.This was achieved due to regular assessments, prioritizing resources (equipment, drugs and supplies) that are essential for adherence to recommended practices; “upskilling” health workers in key areas where performance was found to be lacking; improving compliance through post-training onsite mentoring and troubleshooting support (including drills), and applying WHO-endorsed Safe Childbirth Checklist; as well as improving the use of data to drive action and increase accountability via standardized data collection tools. Professional associations such as FOGSI have played a pivotal role in bringing together and motivating community of providers to join the quality bandwagon. Such partnerships are critical.We need frameworks for assuring quality of care over time. Providers need to be regularly reassessed to make sure they are keeping up with their skills. Those who demonstrate compliance with FOGSI’s evidence-based standards specific to maternity care must receive a stamp endorsing quality. In addition, payers can ensure that they are buying quality services for their patients by making certification mandatory for participation in their insurance/health financing schemes.To drive patient demand for quality, we need tools that empower women to make informed choices about where they seek care. Consumers should have the option to choose to deliver their babies only in certified hospitals.Sustaining quality eventually requires the might of the entire health care ecosystem – the government, regulatory authorities, the private sector, civil society, development agencies and academics to ensure that the right incentives are entrenched in the system. State and national leaders can play a catalyst in forging cross-sectoral alliances and supporting quality improvement through concrete policy and regulatory action.We need accrediting bodies to recognize and adopt quality standards for maternal health and help build out complementary certification, surveillance and other quality assurance mechanisms. And we need buy-in from payers, including Janani Suraksha Yojana (JSY) and other schemes. Financing and quality assurance efforts must work in tandem to ensure that services are adequate – and affordable. This will strengthen our health care system.It’s time for all maternal health stakeholders in this country to hold ourselves and others accountable for delivering – and demanding – the kind of care every woman deserves during one of the most important, and potentially perilous, moments in her life. A “world where no woman dies giving life” from preventable causes is indeed possible. Show every mother in India that #SheMatters.This post originally appeared on ET Healthworld.Share this:last_img read more

New Jobs and Internships in Maternal, Newborn and Child Health

first_imgShare this: ShareEmailPrint To learn more, read: Posted on August 30, 2019Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to email this to a friend (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window)Interested in a position in reproductive, maternal, newborn, child or adolescent health? Every month, the Maternal Health Task Force rounds up job and internship postings from around the globe.AfricaReproductive Health Program Management Advisor: PSI; Niamey, NigerSenior Advisor, Community Engagement: Save the Children; Bamako, MaliSenior Social and Behavior Change Advisor: Save the Children; Bamako, MaliM&E Director, Continuum of Care, Technical Assistance: PATH; Lusaka, Zambia (must have legal authorization to work in Zambia)Advocacy and Policy Manager, Advocacy and Public Policy: PATH; Kampala, Uganda (must have legal authorization to work in Uganda)Reproductive & Maternal Health Project Associate: Partners in Health; Kono, Sierra LeoneAsiaTechnical Director: Jhpiego; Afghanistan (Afghan nationals are strongly encouraged to apply)Program Director, Reproductive, Maternal, Newborn, Child and Adolescent Health: PATH; New Delhi, IndiaNorth AmericaCommunications and Influence Manager: Jacaranda Health; Durham, NCSPO, Child Survival and Surveillance: Gates Foundation; Seattle, WADivision Chief, Maternal, Child, and Family Health: State of Illinois; Cook County, ILSenior Program Specialist Maternal and Child Health: International Development Research Center; Ottawa, ON, CanadaResearch Assistant II, Delivery Decisions: Ariadne Labs; Boston, MANational Director, Research, Evaluation & Data: Planned Parenthood; New York, NYSenior Data Analyst: Planned Parenthood; US RemoteTORCH Reproductive Health Educator: National Institute for Reproductive Health; New York, NYOnline Communications Assistant, Media and Communications Branch, Division of Communications and Strategic Partnerships (DCS): UNFPA; New York, NY (Closing date: 26 September 2019 – 5:00pm EST)Maternal and Newborn Health Lead, MOMENTUM: Save the Children; Washington DCFamily Planning/Reproductive Health Lead, MOMENTUM: Save the Children; Washington DCSRHR Resource Mobilization Intern – US Government: CARE; Atlanta, GATechnical Lead, Immunizations, Maternal, Newborn, Child Health and Nutrition: PATH; Washington DC—Is your organization hiring? Please contact us if you have maternal health job or internship opportunities that you would like included in our next job roundup.last_img read more

Butlers run offers hope for smaller schools

When Gordon Hayward let go of the shot, college basketball fans jumped out of their seats. As the ball neared the basket, it felt like the end of a Hollywood movie, only without the corny music playing in the background. To the disappointment of many, except Duke fans and gamblers, Hayward’s shot clanked off the rim. Duke, the mighty No. 1 seed, won the game 61-59 and took home the National Championship.  Although Butler did not win the game, the effects of this tournament run will not soon be forgotten. As many sports analysts compare this Butler basketball team to a modern-day “Hoosiers,” it is important to recognize that this is not a movie, but reality. The championship matchup featured the NCAA basketball powerhouse Duke versus the mid-major Horizon League opponent Butler. It was 2008 Olympic gold medal coach Mike Krzyzewski against 33-year-old former pharmaceutical salesman Brad Stevens. According to rivals.com, every member of Duke’s starting lineup was at least a four-star recruit. With every advantage leaning toward the Blue Devils, how did Butler only lose by two points? The truth is, Butler’s flair for the dramatic was a common tournament occurrence. The Bulldogs reached the championship because they excelled in two facets of the game. First, they played extraordinary defense. Their tenacious and gritty play helped them limit each NCAA Tournament opponent, except for Duke, to fewer than 60 points. Second, Butler was the better team under pressure. Its first test was in the second round when it inched out a two-point victory against No. 13 Murray State.  The Sweet 16 didn’t get any easier as the Bulldogs faced No. 1 Syracuse. After the Orange went up by four points with 5:23 remaining, the Bulldogs kept their composure and did not allow another field goal until 35 seconds left in the game, securing a 63-59 victory.  In the Elite Eight, Butler led the game most of the way until No. 2 Kansas State tied it at 54 with 3:09 remaining. Butler scored the next nine points to advance to the first Final Four appearance in school history. The Bulldogs then edged out fifth seed Michigan State 52-50 to reach the championship. Each game tested Butler’s strength. On paper, Duke should have rolled away with the victory easily, but Butler’s improbable run was fueled by heart and desire. The team would not go down without a fight. Butler’s journey to the championship game sends a message to mid-major students all across the nation. In the words of Kevin Garnett, “Anything is possibleeeee!” All jokes aside, the reverberations from this tremendous run should impact incoming high school recruits. Not only should it be easier for Butler to lure top prospects, but it might be easier for other mid-major schools to gain some legitimacy, as well. Butler was not only playing for itself, but for all the other smaller schools who could only dream to be in their position. In one of the greatest championship games ever, Butler gave mid-majors hope that they, too, can one day achieve such a goal. It is easy to assume Butler will not be overlooked by tournament time next year. Andy Katz of ESPN.com predicts Butler to be ranked preseason No. 3. The Bulldogs’ tournament run will force sports analysts to pay more attention to smaller schools. In addition, many brackets next year will inherently be filled with many more upset picks than in 2010. The small schools now have the media spotlight to shine on a national stage. read more

Ohio States Luke Fickell would exit post as Buckeyes head man with

ANN ARBOR, Mich. — Urban Meyer has reportedly agreed to become Ohio State football’s next head coach, according to multiple media reports. If Luke Fickell is indeed in the waning hours of his time as OSU’s head coach as the reports suggest, he’ll have the support of his players as he leaves the position.After Saturday’s 40-34 loss to Michigan, which may have been Fickell’s last time at the helm of OSU football, the coach was visibly distraught as he fielded questions about his future with the program.“Like I said, it’s about the Ohio State-Michigan game,” Fickell said during the post-game press conference after a second-consecutive question was asked regarding his future as OSU coach. “It’s going to be about that always, and that’s the way it is.”Fickell slammed his fist against a table during the statement.Players supported Fickell after what may have been his final game as head coach.Senior wide receiver DeVier Posey, who was suspended for the first 10 game of the season after two five-game suspensions for receiving improper benefits and for being overpaid for work he did not do at a summer job, said he didn’t know what the future held for the OSU coaching staff.“Oh man, if I was on the Board of Trustees I would give you that answer, but I don’t know,” Posey said. “I love coach Fickell. He’s a great guy (and) a great coach. He’s a great leader. I can’t make that call. All I know is I love playing for the man.”Senior running back Daniel “Boom” Herron was suspended for the first six games of the regular season and said that Fickell was key to stabilizing the program as players went on and off suspension throughout the year.“I think (the team) handled it very well,” Herron said. “The team stuck together. I coach Fickell did a great job of keeping the team together. I think he’s a great coach and I think he should definitely get a chance.”Should Fickell’s time as coach end in the hours and days to come, he would be just the seventh OSU coach to serve for a period of one season and the first to do so in the modern era of Buckeyes football. Paul Bixler led the Buckeyes to a 4-3-2 record during the 1946 season and is the most recent coach to serve for one season. Other one-and-done coaches in OSU football history include Charles Hickey (1896), David Edwards (1897), Howard Jones (1910), Harry Vaughn (1911) and John Richards (1912).Fickell led the Buckeyes to a 6-6 regular season record and is tied with Jones and Richards for the most wins among one-season coaches.The Buckeyes (6-6, 3-5) now wait to see if they are invited to a postseason bowl game. read more

Football JT Barretts record watch – By the Numbers

Ohio State redshirt senior quarterback J.T. Barrett (16) throws a pass in the second quarter of the 2017 Ohio State- UNLV game on Sep. 23. Ohio State won 54- 21. Credit: Jack Westerheide | Photo EditorLost among the quarterback controversy at Ohio State has been the extended success of quarterback J.T. Barrett. The fifth-year senior has posted up statistics that rank him among the program’s greatest in history. Here is a look at records he has broken and records he still has yet to set.22 – Ohio State records Barrett currently holds. As he prepares for the fifth game in his final season under center for Ohio State, Barrett holds 22 school records for either single-game, season or career statistics, with a chance to add some more to his resume before the end of the season. Touchdown passes? Barrett with 79 (second is Bobby Hoying with 57). Two-hundred-yard passing games? Barrett with 21, five more than Hoying. Average total offense per game? Barrett at 285 yards (Terrelle Pryor is second at 185.2). And just two weeks ago against Army, Barrett surpassed future NFL Hall-of-Famer and former Purdue quarterback Drew Brees for career touchdowns responsible for among Big Ten quarterbacks with his 107th touchdown. He has since moved to 30th on the all-time list with 112 touchdowns, and trails only Oklahoma quarterback Baker Mayfield (117) among active quarterbacks.Ohio State redshirt senior quarterback J.T. Barrett (16) runs the ball in the first quarter of the 2017 OSU- Army game on Sep. 16. OSU won 38-7. Credit: Jack Westerheide | Photo Editor22 (again) – passing touchdowns until Barrett holds the Big Ten record. Brees’ record for most career passing touchdowns could be within Barrett’s reach this season. In his four seasons at Purdue, Brees completed 90 touchdown passes. With just 22 fewer than Brees, Barrett could set the record if he averages even just three touchdown passes per game over the remaining eight games in the schedule, plus any more he throws during postseason bowl games.Barrett already leads Ohio State quarterbacks by miles in this area, having thrown 79 over his career, 22 more than Pryor.201 – passing yards left until Barrett owns the program record. Heading into Saturday’s game against Rutgers, Barrett sits just 201 passing yards away from surpassing Art Schlichter for the most career passing yards at 7,547. He is also just three rushing touchdowns shy of passing Schlichter for the most by an Ohio State quarterback, with the record currently set at 35.In terms of the Big Ten quarterback records for passing yards, Barrett still has a ways to go and is unlikely to break that record. With 7,347 career passing yards, Barrett would need 4,445 this season to surpass Drew Brees’ record. The Buckeyes’ three-time captain has yet to post a season with more than 3,000 passing yards.588* – rushing yards left until Barrett holds the record for most rush yards by an Ohio State quarterback. As a dual-threat quarterback, Barrett has provided the Buckeyes with offense not just with his arm, but also with his legs. Over his career, Barrett has piled up 2,639 rushing yards on 534 total attempts. The only quarterback still ahead of Barrett in terms of rushing yards is Braxton Miller, who totalled 3,053 rushing yards in his time spent as a quarterback.The asterisk by this statistic is just to indicate that Miller rushed for 261 yards his final season in Columbus as an H-back and were not accounted into his total of 3053.Ohio State redshirt senior J.T. Barrett (16) runs the ball in the second quarter of the 2017 Ohio State- UNLV game on Sep. 23. Ohio State won 54- 21. Credit: Jack Westerheide | Photo Editor1.3 – passing efficiency shy of setting Ohio State and Big Ten record. Rate statistics and other non-counting numbers are much more challenging to predict than counting stats. Barrett currently owns a career passing efficiency of 149.8, trailing both the Big Ten and Ohio State record holder Joe Germaine, who sits at 151.0 (minimum of 700 attempts).Over his career, Barrett has only once posted a passer rating of more than 151, and it came in his first season of play. So far this season, he has a rating of 156.8 and has exceeded that 151 mark in all but one of the four games he’s played in so far. It has been an incredibly high passing efficiency mark this season and maintaining this rate could be challenging. But if the three-time captain is able to maintain this rate all season long, he should be able to exceed Germaine.3 – 300-yard passing games shy of setting the Ohio State record. Following up on another record held by Germaine, Barrett has a total of six games in which he has passed for more than 300 yards. Four of Barrett’s 300-plus passing yard games came in his redshirt freshman season. The only other two 300-yard games have come in the season opener last season against Bowling Green and then again in the opener this season against Indiana.For a team that has relied heavily on its running game over the past several seasons, Ohio State might not give Barrett the chance to reach that milestone. Though Barrett has half of his 300-plus yard games against conference opponents, two of those three came in his redshirt freshman season when he was far more invested in the passing game. Three more games is hardly a lofty total to reach, but recent history suggests it could be a challenge for Barrett to set the record. read more

Football Ohio State honors 19 seniors in final home game of the

Ohio State quarterback J.T. Barrett is honored on the field for Senior Day. Credit: Jack Westerheide | Photo EditorThe Ohio State home fans watched as 19 seniors took the field of Ohio Stadium for the final time Saturday as the group of players were recognized individually just before kickoff of its game against Illinois.Each senior ran out of the tunnel to receive a hug from head coach Urban Meyer and deliver flowers to his parents. Fans cheer on QB @JT_theQB4th as he takes the field one last time in Ohio Stadium. #OSUvsIllinois pic.twitter.com/oFMWsveejZ— Lantern TV (@LanternTV) November 18, 2017On the offensive side of the ball, Ohio State saw quarterbacks J.T. Barrett and Stephen Collier, center Billy Price, left tackle Jamarco Jones, tight end Marcus Baugh and wide receiver Elijaah Goins.On the defensive side of the ball, cornerbacks Trevon Forte and Cin’Quan Haney, defensive tackles Tracy Sprinkle and Michael Hill, defensive lineman Nick Seme, defensive end Tyquan Lewis, safeties Damon Webb, Clay Raterman and Erick Smith and linebackers Jackson Hayes, Zach Turnure and Chris Worley.One of the most decorated players in Ohio State football history, quarterback J.T. Barrett runs onto the field at Ohio Stadium for the final time. pic.twitter.com/sIslwCFPLD— Lantern Sports (@LanternSports) November 18, 2017 read more

Mouth To Mouth Wild Run Ride Hits The Beach On Memorial Day

first_imgFacebook0TwitterEmailPrintFriendly分享The 6th Annual Mouth to Mouth Wild Run & Ride is scheduled for Memorial Day Monday, May 27. 10-Mile Mouth to Mouth Wild Run & RideThe 2019 Mouth to Mouth Wild Run & Ride includes a 1-mile beach run or fat bike ride between Kasilof River mouth and the mouth of the Kenai River.  Day of event registration opens at noon.  Race time is set for 2 p.m.The race start will be located at the Kasilof River Special Use Area off Kasilof Beach Stub Rd and the finish line at the Kenai South Beach parking lot off Cannery Rd.Early registration is available for $30 ($25 for Cook Inlet Keepers members) and day of event registration is $40. 3-Mile Fun Run EventIn addition, a 3-mile beach run from Cannery Road beach to the Kenai River mouth and return will begin at 3 p.m. on Monday.   Start time for the 3-mile run is 3 p.m. at Cannery Road beach access off Dunes Road.last_img read more

Toy Story 4 Two new Randy Newman songs cast release date and

Share your voice Comments Pixar Breaking recordsThis may be minor as tidbits go, but could signal greater things for how well this animated film does. On Thursday, Fandango announced that Toy Story 4 had beaten the record for best first day presales for an animated title, outshining last year’s Incredibles 2.TicketsAs Disney’s Twitter account tells us, we can now buy tickets (nearly a month early) to see Toy Story 4 when it arrives in cinemas June 21. Don’t let kids with internet access beat you to the best seats! 2:28 Meet #Forky in this brand-new clip from #ToyStory4. See it in theaters June 21. pic.twitter.com/sVOSf3CZz4— Walt Disney Studios (@DisneyStudios) May 28, 2019 TV and Movies 2 Forky is the newest “toy” in town. Pixar Nine years after Toy Story 3 seemingly delivered the perfect poignant goodbye to Woody and Buzz — we’re back. Disney and Pixar have found a new story deemed worthy of unpacking the beloved characters. Put another way, this 24-year-old series returns to tell a story… about a spork. Below is everything we know about Toy Story 4 which, to be fair, radiates Pixar’s wholesome warmth. We’ve also included reminders of what happened in the previous trilogy, in case time has blurred those adorable childhood adventures. You’ve got a friend in Randy NewmanHe’s back! The man behind multiple Pixar scores as well as one of the most touching ballads between kids and their toys brings us two brand-new songs. They’re ominously titled, “I Can’t Let You Throw Yourself Away” and “The Ballad of the Lonesome Cowboy,” and you can already get a taste of the latter and its performer, Chris Stapleton, on Spotify. Despite the seemingly glum sentiment, it’s fairly upbeat. One of the lyrics: “I just found out… what love is about,” is a stick-in-your-head winner. Meanwhile, “I Can’t Let You Throw Yourself Away” is about trying to stop Forky the spork from throwing himself into the great bin in the sky. Poor guy. Toy Story 4 trailer shows Woody and Bo Peep’s long-awaited… 23 Photos 2:19 Trailers, themes and plot Trailer 1 The official Toy Story 4 trailer plonks us right back in Bonnie’s bedroom, Bonnie being that kid Andy donates Woody and Buzz to at the end of Toy Story 3. After spending a second remembering just how much joy animated characters can bring, we’re introduced to an entirely new toy: a plastic piece of cutlery known as Forky. Forky is Bonnie’s self-made arts and craft creature built of spork, pipe cleaner and googly eyes. In a brief moment, we see Bonnie sitting alone at a school table, suggesting she’s having a hard time making friends. But not a hard time connecting with cutlery. Tickets for #ToyStory4 are now available! Get yours now and see the film in theaters June 21! https://t.co/KvxWjKwwgh pic.twitter.com/TLdEcpawVZ— Walt Disney Studios (@DisneyStudios) May 28, 2019 Everything else Teaser trailer, teaser trailer reaction, Big Game ad, TV spots: meet the many promotional videos for this film. Their most significant contribution is an intro to Ducky and Bunny, voiced by Keegan-Michael Key and Jordan Peele. They’re soft and cuddly carnival prizes who try to pick a fight with Buzz. See who fares better in that tiff. Also see Keanu Reeves as Duke Caboom, aka Keanu Reeves in 3D-animated form. Canada’s best stunt rider has a handle-bar mustache and undertakes awesome leaps of faith, metaphorical and otherwise. Release date Toy Story 4 will spring to life June 21, at a perfect kid-friendly runtime of 89 minutes (though it would be no surprise if 99% of each screening is filled with adults). Same filmmakers? While the first two Toy Stories were directed by Pixar stalwart John Lassater, Lee Unkrich took over for the third (he co-directed the second), and now the baton passes to Josh Cooley in his feature directorial debut. He brings a wealth of experience as a storyboard artist on The Incredibles, Cars, Ratatouille, Up and Inside Out. Note that John Lassater also helps out with Toy Story 4’s storyline, and that the original Toy Story was Lassater’s feature directorial debut. In other words, we’re in safe hands. Cast With new toys joining the original, there’s a lot of voice work going around: "Mamma Mia! Here We Go Again" - UK Premiere - Red Carpet ArrivalsTom Hanks returns to voice Woody. John Phillips/Getty Images Tom Hanks as WoodyTim Allen as Buzz LightyearAnnie Potts as Bo PeepJoan Cusack as JessieBlake Clark as Slinky DogWallace Shawn as RexJohn Ratzenberger as HammDon Rickles as Mr. Potato HeadEstelle Harris as Mrs. Potato HeadJodi Benson as Barbie Michael Keaton as KenJeff Pidgeon as AliensKristen Schaal as TrixieBonnie Hunt as DollyTimothy Dalton as Mr. PricklepantsJeff Garlin as ButtercupLaurie Metcalf as Mrs. DavisLori Alan as Mrs. AndersonTony Hale as ForkyKeegan-Michael Key and Jordan Peele as Ducky and BunnyKeanu Reeves as Duke CaboomChristina Hendricks as Gabby GabbyAlly Maki as Giggle McDimplesMadeleine McGraw as BonnieRickey Henderson as Oakland Athletics bobblehead figurenuke-kaboomSay hello to Duke Caboom. Gonzalo Jiménez/CNET From the filmmakers and actors If it came as a surprise to you to hear Toy Story was coming back for a fourth time — followed by the surprise it would tell a story about a spork — director Cooley shared the same sentiment. “It was the end of Woody’s story with Andy. But just like in life, every ending is a new beginning,” he said in a press release last November. “Woody now being in a new room, with new toys, and a new kid, was something we have never seen before. The questions of what that would be like became the beginning of an entertaining story worth exploring.” Tom Hanks, who’s voiced Woody since 1995, assured us Toy Story 4 will have a huge payoff — and not just on the money side. “When I realized what they were going for, I realized, oh, this is a moment in history,” Hanks said on The Chris Evans Breakfast Show in November. Tim Allen, who’s also been there right from the beginning as Buzz, chose one of the biggest films around to sum up the impact of Toy Story 4. “[Infinity War] didn’t seem like it was going to work … and it was a lot of vignettes that all made sense,” Allen said in an interview on CBS’s The Talk last September. (Disclosure: CBS is CNET’s parent company.) “This Toy Story 4, it is so emotional, it’s so funny, it’s so big, the idea of what they’ve come up with.” Any opportunity to form a connection with a film about toys, spork or otherwise — I’m there. Now playing: Watch this: “The Ballad of the Lonesome Cowboy” from #ToyStory4 is out now. https://t.co/XyQ3517eaS pic.twitter.com/ResOYTfM3f— Chris Stapleton (@ChrisStapleton) June 5, 2019 Note: This article is updated whenever more news rolls in. The freaky Pixar theory that could blow your mind Now playing: Watch this: Toy Story 4 trailer shows Woody on a big road trip A very Forky clipIf you’re hesitating over early tickets, maybe watch this brand-new clip that highlights the perils of toy confiscation and introduces Bonnie’s new friend, Forky. He’s a spork, in case that wasn’t clear. Understandably, Forky’s undergoing an identity crisis: he was made for soups after all. It’s up to the gang to rescue the utensil, who hits the road on a journey that will undoubtedly jump us with a profound reflection on growing up. Along the way, Woody finds his love Bo Peep in an antiques shop fending off, naturally, a hoard of ventriloquist dummies. A changed Bo, with a new under-the-cover-of-night caped persona, talks up the value of change and introduces Woody to the world of a carnival. Unfortunately, the trailer doesn’t answer the question of whether Totoro comes back. We will all, I am sure, be waiting with bated breath for the adorable mute’s return. nullWoody and Bo reunited. Pixar Trailer 2 The second trailer drops a plot bombshell: Bonnie and her family are taking a vacation. In a caravan. Still fun! Forky doesn’t help himself by getting swept out the open window, another opportunity for a gang rescue exercise. On a deeper note, Woody has come a long way since the egotistical cowboy of the first film, putting himself on the line to rescue a slightly questionable toy he knows makes his kid happy. That’s character development, Game of Thrones! Tags read more