Google Asks Manufacturers to Hold Off on Google TV Debut at CES

first_imgTags:#Google#web Related Posts A Web Developer’s New Best Friend is the AI Wai… Top Reasons to Go With Managed WordPress Hosting Why Tech Companies Need Simpler Terms of Servic…center_img mike melanson 8 Best WordPress Hosting Solutions on the Market It looks like there’s been an interruption in Google’s regularly scheduled programming. The company has asked three separate television makers to hold off on their Google TV debuts at the Consumer Electronics Show in Las Vegas next month after receiving a round of lukewarm reviews.Already, both Sony and Logitech have released Internet-enabled TVs and Google TV devices, but Google has asked other companies to hold off until it can “refine the software”, reports The New York Times. According to the Times, “Google has asked the TV makers to delay their introductions, according to people familiar with the company’s plans, so that it can refine the software, which has received a lukewarm reception. The late request caught some of the manufacturers off guard.”Google just released one such refinement last week, introducing a voice-controlled Android remote app, enhanced controls over split screen viewing and refined movie searches. The biggest feature of last week’s update, however, was a Netflix app that was actually worth using. No longer do Google TV users need to use a separate device to choose content to view on their Google TV. It’s problems like this that left many early users complaining that Google TV wasn’t ready for prime time and it seems that Google has heard that message.An unusable Netflix app, however, is just the beginning. As Janko Roettgers points out at GigaOm, Google TV is missing several features that would make it a whole, usable product, such as apps. It also needs to differentiate itself and embrace the idea that it is indeed a cord-cutting device and not just a tool for users to enhance pay TV service. (Currently, Google TV only works with Dish Network, further limiting its attractiveness to potential users.)According to the Times, “TV makers have been asked to hold off on releasing products until Google completes the new version of its software, adding features like an application store,” which means we aren’t likely to see more Google TV devices until some time in early 2011.last_img read more

Free webinar: Mastering the in-person ask

first_imgIf the thought of asking for a donation in person makes you sweat, Network for Good’s next free webinar is for you.Tune in Tuesday, April 16 at 1 p.m. Eastern to hear fundraising expert Jay Frost give nonprofits the insider scoop on garnering support via one of the most powerful methods — the in-person ask.Join us and learn answers to the following: How to ask for donations in a way that is comfortable for youHow to identify your unique asking strengths and best use themWhy asking for gifts doesn’t have to be so scary!Register here.last_img read more

The most important holiday for all fundraisers

first_imgThanks to the most-photogenic NFGers for reminding us why it’s important to #beyourdonor on October 24th!Network for Good’s favorite holiday is this month. Although we do love Halloween, October 24this Be Your Donor Day and the reason why we celebrate big this month! Sometimes fundraisers are so caught up in the day to day that we forget how important our donors are to our organization’s success. Without understanding how our donors interact with our organization, what the donation process looks like from a donors’ point of view, and how donors are thanked for their gift, we can’t do much to improve (or overhaul!) the process.It takes more effort to bring in a new donor than to retain an existing donor. Once a donor starts a relationship with your organization, do your best to ensure that donor has a positive experience. That’s why we want all fundraisers to join in and celebrate this very important holiday. Block out some time on October 24th and do an audit of your donor communication. Make sure your all your fundraising activities are donor-centric. Don’t know where to start? Here are some ideas:· Your home page’s Donate Now button should take less than 5 seconds to locate and donors shouldn’t have to make more than one click to get to your donation page. · Thank you letters should talk less about how much your organization does and should instead talk more about what a donor’s gifts does. · Your organization’s contact information should be easy to find on your website, letterhead, emails, and gift receipts. And when a donor does call, promptly answer questions.We recommend you download our complete Be Your Donor Day checklist and check out all your fundraising activities for “donor-centricness”. Be your donor on October 24th and be your organization’s fundraising superhero!last_img read more

The PartoPen: Working to Increase the Effectiveness of the Partograph

first_imgPosted on August 10, 2012Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to email this to a friend (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window)Our colleagues at Maternova recently highlighted on their innovation index a new tool (that is currently in development) that aims to increase the effectiveness of the partograph. The PartoPen is being developed by University of Colorado-Boulder Ph.D candidate Heather Underwood.According to Maternova’s innovation index:Using an infrared camera, the pen takes picture of dots that are pre-printed on the paper that act as GPS coordinates for the pen. The pen provides real-time feedback for:     · Decision support: Based on location of the pen on graph, the pen will provide next steps     · Reminders: Auto-reminders of time and procedure     · Error Checking: ex. Recording a temperature in F vs. C, pen recognizes the errorThe digital partograph system provides real-time data feedback and reinforces birth attendant training, while retaining the paper-and-pen interface currently used by most healthcare workers. The system is currently being evaluated in Kenya.This project received a $100,000 Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation grant to develop and implement the technology.Learn more about this new tool from Maternova here.More information:Visit the PartoPen site.Access several documents about the partograph in the MHTF Library. (Just enter “partograph” in the search box!)Read a number of blog posts about the partograph on the MHTF Blog.Share this: ShareEmailPrint To learn more, read:last_img read more

Join the MHTF and the Wilson Center September 23 to Launch: “Delivering Success: Scaling Up Solutions for Maternal Health”

first_img ShareEmailPrint To learn more, read: Posted on September 16, 2013February 2, 2017By: Sarah Blake, MHTF consultantClick to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to email this to a friend (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window)Next Monday, September 23, the MHTF will join the Wilson Center in launching a new report, Delivering Success: Scaling Up Solutions for Maternal Health, which draws on the experiences of the Advancing Policy Dialogue in Maternal Health series. The launch event will be held from 3:00-5:00 pm (EDT) at the Wilson Center, in Washington, DC, and will feature speakers from the MHTF and several of our partners and colleagues, including UNFPA and the Public Health Foundation of India.From the event announcement:Since 2009, the Wilson Center’s Advancing Dialogue on Maternal Health series, one of the few forums dedicated to maternal health, has brought together experts, donors, and policymakers from around the world to leverage their collective knowledge and move forward on reducing pregnancy-related deaths and complications. As part of the 2012-2013 series, the Wilson Center and the Population Foundation of India convened a workshop on neglected maternal health issues which brought together participants in New Delhi with audiences at the Wilson Center and the Harvard School of Public Health. Join us as we launch Delivering Success: Scaling Up Solutions for Maternal Health, a new report which captures, analyzes, and synthesizes the strategies and recommendations that emerged from the series. Delivering Success consolidates key findings and ties them to discussions taking place in global forums.If you are interested in attending the event in person, visit the Wilson Center for more details, or RSVP here. To join the discussion on Twitter, use the hashtag #MHDialogue.Share this:last_img read more

3 Steps to Getting Corporate Sponsors for Your Event

first_imgFundraising events take a fair amount of money to produce, and it’s easy to spend more money on the event that it actually raises. There are a number of ways to keep this from happening (like setting a realistic budget and fundraising goal and having a data-backed plan to boost donations), but one of the most efficient ways to ensure your event is a net financial gain is through corporate sponsorships.So, how do you get corporate sponsors to support your event?Step 1: Identify prospects.To start, ask yourself: which companies should be targeted as sponsors? Ideally, you’d like sponsors that fit well with your mission, and whose target markets overlap the demographics of your guests. In other words, the people attending your event would also be likely to support your sponsors.Leverage your board’s personal networks and see if anyone has any connections that might be a good fit. Ask board members if they’d be willing to contact these companies directly, by signing the proposal letter and making a follow-up phone call after it’s been sent.Another method of finding potential sponsors is looking at your competitors. Which companies are sponsoring their events? Who are the competitors of those companies? It helps to check out event pages and websites to find out what kind of publicity your competitors are giving their sponsors.Step 2: Find out what matters to them.If you want to win over a sponsor, you need to speak their language. Formulate your approach with one question in mind: What’s in it for the sponsor?A corporate sponsor is looking for benefits like a new business, more customers, a halo effect with their customer base to encourage brand loyalty or visibility. When you approach prospective sponsors, listen more than you talk, and ask them about their goals and priorities. Then, show how it’s a big benefit to them to be in front of your audience.Chris Baylis at www.sponsorshipcollective.com has five great questions to ask potential sponsor:Who is your target audience?How do you normally engage in sponsorship?What does your target market value?What are your sales goals for the coming year?What would you consider to be the most important elements of a sponsorship proposal?While you’re communicating with various organizations, make sure you’re tracking your interactions. Use your donor management system to create an organization record for every company you approach. If you can’t easily track organizations in your current donor database, talk to us about switching to a system that gives you the option to make a company record.Step 3: Make them a winning offer.With all this background information, you’re ready to formulate a compelling proposal. First things first, your job is to sell the benefit to the sponsor. The cost of that benefit is your sponsorship package. Think of this way:Event Package + Promotional Package + Donation = Sponsorship PackageThat means you should lead with “Here’s what we can do for you – let’s make this win-win happen together,” not “Here’s our sponsorship package – please support us.” You need to demonstrate the value to them.So, how much should you actually charge your sponsors? A lot of it will depend on what you learn from your conversation with them. Also, get to know the market by looking at the competition. What do similar organizations in your region charge?Then, consider your own event. How many people will be attending your event? What kind of exposure can you offer for your sponsors? The answers to all of these questions can help you come up with a fair dollar amount.As you’re working to win over your sponsor, make sure you’re clear on what their role will be. It’s critical to establish clear parameters that are ethical and appropriate from the start.Once your sponsors have agreed to support you, follow-up with a contract – and create a plan to make you both successful. Involve the sponsor in planning and promotion so they feel like an integral part of your event – and so your event feels like part of their overall outreach strategy. The deeper the thought you put into the partnership, the deeper the partnership will be.Not only are corporate sponsors great partners for funding your event, but they lend your event more reach and recognition within your network. Knowing that a well-reputed business supports your cause gives your organization legitimacy in the eyes of a potential attendee or donor. Take advantage of this strategy for the long-term with your organization. Your sponsor’s for-profit savvy and business sense can be a powerful tool beyond your upcoming event.last_img read more

5 New Year Resolutions Every Fundraiser Should Make

first_imgYou know what takes a lot of inspiration and a truckload of guts?  Fundraising.I learned this the hard way when I started a nonprofit in the living room of my apartment with just $500 and a credit card.  There were days when I second guessed myself but ten years later we raised over 10 million dollars and have been featured on Oprah, CNN, and the Today show.  Last year, Girlstart turned 20.  I’ve learned a lot since then, including how to get the absolute best fundraising results in the shortest possible time using scientifically proven methods.So what tips do I have for you to make 2018 your best year ever?  Lots!  Are you ready to ring in the new year raising more?  Here are 5 New Year resolutions I want EVERY fundraiser to make:1. Resolve to learn more about your donors.Why did they give to your organization – what connected to them? What programs do they care about?  What motivated them to give in the first place?  What was the best gift they ever gave and why?  Of all the organizations they support which one does the best job engaging them?  What are their top three philanthropic priorities?  What do they love about what they do?  How do they prefer to be communicated with?  You can ask some of these questions when you call them to thank them just for being a donor and others in a visually rich donor survey.2. Resolve to learn from your data.Do you know what your donor retention rate is? If you don’t know how you’re currently performing, setting goals to improve is meaningless. You can examine retention overall or narrow it down to first-time donors and/or major donors. You can calculate retention by the number of donors or gift value.  I personally recommend examining by gift value so you know exactly what your retention rate is costing your organization.  To run your numbers, decide on your 12 month date range (a calendar year or your fiscal year) and add the donor gift amounts by annual “class” i.e. the class of major donors giving $1,000 or more in 2017 (or the class of all 1st time donors in 2017) and then divide that amount by what those same donors gave to you the previous year, in 2016.  In other words, if you had 1,000 first time donors in 2016 and only 200 of those made another gift in 2017 your new donor retention rate would be 20%.  Why does retention matter so much?  Acquiring those donors cost you money, time and effort.  As Roger Craver, author of Retention Fundraising, advises, “Taking actionable steps to reduce donor losses is the least expensive way to increase your fundraising income.”3. Resolve to make your donors FEEL something.This is one of my biggest pet peeves in fundraising. Giving is such a joyous experience but so much of our communications can feel bland and lifeless. Does your appeal or acknowledgment make your donor feel great about themselves? It should. What we feel is irrelevant. What our donors feel is the only thing that matters. While we’re busy trying to educate our donors, or boasting about how awesome our programs are, our donor might be tossing our letter in the trash. Communicate in a warm, friendly, personable tone. Make the donor feel like gushing over what they made possible. If your autoresponders sound like a robot wrote them, it’s time for a rewrite in 2018!4. Set a revenue goal for every donor in your portfolio.Base your appeal goals on your donor’s capacity, inclination, prior giving, and interests.  Now you’re ready for your best fundraising year ever!  What’s more, when your CEO walks in and tells you about a budget shortfall you’ve got solid ground to push back on unrealistic goals.5. Resolve to dedicate 30 minutes a day to call and personally thank donors.Don’t start with the biggest and then fall off the wagon on this goal come February.  If you can, include new donors to your call list.  Be prepared with a few great discovery questions and opportunities for them to engage with you deeper.  Before you know it, your lower level donors will be major gift prospects.  The secret is you have to STICK WITH IT.  Put it on your calendar as a recurring appointment when your energy levels are at their peak.  Don’t forget to smile while you’re talking or leaving a message.I’d love to share more of my secrets with you – Download the NFG Masterclass Webinar Fundraising Strategy Series with “The Secrets of High Performing Fundraisers”.  Want more help?  I have OODLES of guides to make your fundraising EASIER.Here’s to 2018!Learn more about our guest blogger:Rachel Muir, CFRE transforms individuals into confident, successful fundraisers through workshops and retreats.  When she was 26 years old, Rachel Muir launched Girlstart, a non-profit organization to empower girls in math, science, engineering and technology in the living room of her apartment with $500 and a credit card.  Several years later she had raised over 10 million dollars and was featured on Oprah, CNN, and the Today show. Learn more about Rachel at www.rachelmuir.com or follow her at facebook.com/rachelmuirfundraising and on Twitter @rachelmuir.last_img read more

How Technology is Changing Fundraising: Q&A with CEO Bill Strathmann

first_imgMediaplanet recently interviewed Network for Good CEO, Bill Strathmann, for a supplement in USA Today. The series, Empowering Nonprofits, included a piece titled “Experts on How Technology Is Changing the Future of Fundraising,” featuring five leaders using technology to level the fundraising playing field for small nonprofits. You can read the full feature here but we wanted to share some of Bill’s answers directly with you.How has technology changed fundraising?Technology has leveled the fundraising playing field for small nonprofits who make up the vast majority of the sector…more than a million of them. To reach donors, direct mail was unaffordable, to fundraise online ecommerce was inaccessible, and to spread awareness social media was incomprehensible. Now, small nonprofits can manage donors with advanced technology that doesn’t require an advanced technology degree. Even companies like Facebook and Google have incorporated fundraising technology that empowers any consumer to fundraise for any charity…instantly. The small nonprofit has arrived.Where do you see nonprofit technology in the next 5-10 years?In the U.S., 75% of giving comes from individuals. That will continue, but the Gen X and Millennial generations will soon replace Boomers as the primary fundraising source, as Millennials (now already 22-38 years old) enter their income-generating years and as the $30T great wealth transfer begins. That means fundraising will be all about digital engagement and will follow the changes in consumer engagement we are already seeing today…the expectation, at your finger tips, for easy experiences, transparency, real-time communication, and tangible results/impact that can be celebrated virally. As a result, donor-nonprofit relationships will also shift to more “subscription” model programs and fewer “one-off” experiences…if nonprofits get it right.What is your best advice for a nonprofit looking to upscale their fundraising impact?Change your perspective. Netflix, Amazon, and Apple have changed consumer behavior to expect instant, curated, and relevant content that can be accessed anywhere at any time. For nonprofits those are tough expectations to match unless they shift their perspective such that nonprofits reframe the donor-nonprofit relationship from treating donors like ATM machines to serving donors with stories and content that provides compelling evidence of impact and rewards donors emotionally for their financial contribution. Donors are consumers and will pay and stay…as long as they continue to see and feel value from their contribution.What are some of the most important functions of technology for nonprofits?Data management is the most all-encompassing and important function of technology for nonprofits, especially now with cloud-based solutions that make accessibility unlimited, visualization understandable, storage costs nominal, and using it easy. The two functions that are runner-ups are marketing and communications automation and payments. Nonprofits need to be able to reach their people, tell their stories, and share their impact. And when it comes to payments, nonprofits do not have cash registers…and checks are going the way of the Dodo.What is the biggest advantage of technology for the nonprofit sector?I can’t choose one. I’ll name three. Efficiency. Reach. Data.Read more on The Nonprofit Bloglast_img read more

NFG Staff Profile: AJ Johnson

first_imgThe idea of being able to help someone attracts AJ to nonprofits. From an early age, she was involved with a Golden Retriever rescue organization and co-founded a satellite rescue facility. Working remote in Florida, you’ll find AJ at one of the awesome parks in Orlando, FL on her days off!“Nothing brings a smile to my face more than when I watch our customers have that “a-ha” moment in real time.”Q&A with AJ Johnson, Customer Success ManagerWhat do you do at Network for Good?I currently work as a Customer Success Specialist on the Welcome Team! I like to tell my customers that I’m a little bit like a driving instructor – I’m here to help them understand not only their product, but how the different components work together to help boost their fundraising. I get to work with folks for their first few months so that they’ll have a point of contact for their questions, and make sure I can provide them with the resources they’ll need to be successful after my time working with them ends.What is your experience with nonprofit organizations outside of Network for Good?I’ve always been involved with the nonprofit world one way or another. When I first heard about the 9/11 attacks, I immediately asked my parents how we’d be able to help the families who’d lost a loved one. After my family adopted a golden retriever from a small rescue while I was in middle school, we became involved enough to co-found our own rescue, using a network of volunteers, fosters, and transport specialists (#adoptdontshop, always!). I raised money through donations from my Bat Mitzvah for the rescue’s benefit, and I even ran their fledgling social media accounts for a while in high school! My passion has always been with the LGBTQ+ community, though, and I have volunteered with various queer organizations (and I do, to this day!). My focus has always been making sure people across the gender spectrum have access to safe, comfortable, and affordable medical care.What attracts you to nonprofits? I just love the concept of being able to do everything in your power to help someone. I’ve found motivation in helping those who maybe don’t even realize that they might need help, and I’ve found motivation in giving voices to those who maybe don’t have the capability to speak up. It’s that motivation that moves me to incorporate service in all parts of my life – work, play, and everything in between.What do you enjoy most about your work? Nothing brings a smile to my face more than when I watch our customers have that “aha!” moment when I’m on the phone with them. When everything clicks together for them, in that moment, it’s easy to see their excitement grow – they often are realizing exactly how they’ll be able to use the system to reach more donors with their message. Nonprofits are people’s passions, their hearts and souls, and being able to see it all click as they use their new system is just so fulfilling. I also love the exposure I get to nonprofits and causes that I’d never heard of – there are so many incredible people doing incredible things and it’s inspiring to see the kind of solutions people can find and the real magic they can do.What do you enjoy doing outside work? I live (and work remotely) about 30 miles south of Orlando, and I’m a huge adrenaline junkie, so on my days off, there’s a good chance you’ll find me at one of the theme parks in the area. I’ve got annual passes to Universal, Sea World, and Disney World, but I’ve always been a Disney kid at heart, so sometimes I’ll just go to the parks to grab a Mickey pretzel with cheese and people watch. Universal is great, too, for when I need a little Hogwarts magic to get through the weekend, and you’ll catch me most nights during the fall at their Halloween Horror Nights, hiding behind my partner from all of the scares! Sea World has become a recent favorite, though, because you can actually feed some of the little rays some anchovies, or watch the baby dolphins as they play tag and chase each other in the nursery. No matter which park I’m at, though, I’ll be somewhere near those roller coasters!Lightning RoundDream vacation? A full European adventure. I took Italian in high school and fell in love with the language, the culture, the architecture, the art – but if I’m headed on a dream trip, why only include one stop on the tour?Most recent book read? I’m currently reading Retta’s memoir “So Close to Being the Sh*t, Y’all Don’t Even Know” and I haven’t been able to stop laughing. She’s funny and poignant, and it goes so far beyond her time on Parks and Rec. I love to read though, and I’ve got over a thousand physical books at home – don’t even ask my about my Kindle.Last movie seen in movie theater? The last two have been Aladdin and Toy Story 4 – I wasn’t kidding about being a Disney kid!Theme song? “Don’t Threaten Me With A Good Time” by Panic! At the Disco.Favorite color? Blue!All time favorite athlete? Right now, it’s Coco Gauff – she’s an honest-to-goodness inspiration. At fifteen, she’s competing in Wimbledon against her all-time hero – at fifteen, I think I was working part-time at a water park! She sets such an example for anyone who wants to follow their dreams, as cheesy as it sounds. Read more on The Nonprofit Bloglast_img read more

From Mexico City: Iatrogenic Fistula on the Rise as More Women Gain Access to Surgery

first_imgShare this: ShareEmailPrint To learn more, read: Posted on October 21, 2015October 13, 2016By: Sandeep Bathala, Senior Program Associate, Maternal Health Initiative, Wilson CenterClick to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to email this to a friend (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window)Obstetric fistula is a devastating childbirth injury caused by prolonged obstructed labor. It can lead to incontinence and infection, social stigmatization as others recoil in horror, and even mental illness. Between 50,000 to 100,000 women each year are affected by it – and it’s entirely preventable with proper medical attention.In my professional career, I have had the opportunity to visit three fistula hospitals, in Mali and Ethiopia. The challenges around unequal access to care stare you down in these places. Intravenous bags are held up by sticks in some cases, and each woman’s story is an exercise in heartbreak.Today, on the second day of the Global Maternal and Newborn Health Conference in Mexico City, I had the opportunity to learn more about a new kind of fistula complication that is emerging.Dr. Lauri Romanzi, who spoke at the Wilson Center in July and is project director of the USAID/EngenderHealth Fistula Care Plus Project, explained how increased access to cesarean sections without regard to quality of care is causing an increase in iatrogenic fistulas, a form of fistula unintentionally caused by a health care provider.Iatrogenic fistulas are sometimes caused by inexperienced clinicians who are thrown into situations with many patients. According to research conducted by Dr. Thomas Raassen, a surgeon for the non-profit Operation Fistula, more than 13 percent of fistulas in 65 hospitals across East Africa and Asia over an 18-year period were iatrogenic.Raassen stressed the importance of better training (some medical officers receive only two months of instruction) and suggested staff should perform cesarean sections under supervision before they are posted to hospitals. Cesarean sections are “easy until they aren’t,” he said. They are major surgery, and mistakes can cause a lot of damage.He also stressed the need for cesarean section alternatives, especially in the unfortunate case of a dead fetus after days of obstructed labor.It’s not just an increase in poor quality cesarean section surgeries, said Dr. SK Nazmul Huda, a project manager with Fistula Care Plus in Bangladesh. He shared data from the National Fistula Center and three major hospitals in Bangladesh indicating that 27 percent of fistulas were iatrogenic from 2012 to 2014, but three quarters were caused by poor quality hysterectomies. Lack of access to quality care spans across a woman’s life cycle.Dr. Ganda Sanda of Niger’s Hopital National de Lamorde Niamey highlighted issues around classification and data. Should fistulas caused by sexual violence or female genital cutting be considered iatrogenic? How do we prevent these causes and prepare doctors to deal with them?Romanzi stressed throughout the session that fistula is an indicator of inequity. Fistulas are on the rise at a time when more women have access to cesarean sections and hysterectomies, which should be a good thing. But the poorest women are having a much harder time accessing high quality care.I look forward to learning more about equity and quality of care issues tomorrow.Sandeep Bathala is reporting from 2015 Global Maternal and Newborn Health Conference in Mexico City for the Wilson Center, Maternal Health Task Force, and UN Population Fund.Photo: “Partner surgeon and staff during a fistula repair surgery” ©2014 Dining for Women, used under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs license.last_img read more