Resources and inspiration for the next 90 days

first_imgWhere does the time go? There are just ninety days left until the end of the year. This means that you’re probably putting the final touches on your year-end fundraising plans and have a solid campaign ready to go. Not so much? First, don’t panic. There’s still plenty of time to create a solid plan and get the most out of the year-end giving season. Take a deep breath, then carve out some time to review your goals and start honing your campaign materials. Here at Network for Good, we recently published two free fundraising guides that can help you plan your marketing efforts and create a great appeal. You can download them here (registration required): How to Make the Case for Giving 7 Steps to Your Best Nonprofit Marketing Plan EverSecond, surround yourself with inspiration and smart advice. Our goal is to supply both with this blog, and here are a few of our favorites to add to your list:Future Fundraising Now: No-nonsense practical advice from Jeff Brooks, one of our favorite fundraising gurus.Sasha Dichter’s Blog: Big thoughts on giving from the mastermind behind Generosity Day.Sea Change Strategies: Alia and Mark offer simply brilliant thoughts on nonprofit storytelling, effective appeals, strategic planning, and everything in between.Fundraiser Grrl: When you need a laugh, Fundraiser Grrl totally gets it.For more inspiration, check out the Nonprofit Boot Camp and Social Media for Nonprofits conference happening on October 10 & 11 in San Francisco. Our friends at Social Media for Nonprofits have put together some great workshops to help your organization be the best it can be. There’s still time to register, and you can save $20 off with the code “N4G”.last_img read more

LUCKY 13: Thirteen weeks to plan for the best giving season ever – starting with #GivingTuesday

first_imgCrunch time!Can it be…Labor Day weekend is really behind us? 2014 is in the home stretch and that means it is crunch time for nonprofits.In fact, 30% of the projected $300 billion in total annual donations to charities are made in December — and 10%, or $30 billion, come during the year’s last 48 hours. (Source: NY Post, December 2013)For most nonprofits, it’s make or break time. And for donors, whether they are motivated by making an impact or by the tax year, December underlines the urgency of giving.Countdown to #GivingTuesdayThe movement that has changed the December giving season since 2012 is #GivingTuesday. It started with a simple idea – to be a counterpoint to the consumerism of Black Friday and CyberMonday. From a couple hundred nonprofits in 2012, #GivingTuesday has grown into an international day of giving with organizations and donors around the globe joining the movement.Traditionally, year-end givers to nonprofits are loyal supporters or those with personal ties to an organization. Now, nonprofits can harness the energy of #GivingTuesday to engage new donors, and to extend and amplify the giving season. We know first hand. Last year we led BMoregivesMore, the campaign to make Baltimore the most generous city in America on #GivingTuesday. Nonprofits that participated in BMoreGivesMore reported that between 20% and 60% of donors on that day were new. And more than 80% who shared their results said that they had a comparable or better December overall!13 Tuesdays to go: We’re here for you.Despite all the excitement and opportunity of #GivingTuesday, your team has a full plate planning for year-end already. So how do you capitalize on #GivingTuesday?Network for Good is launching N4G Gives, a national campaign to launch the giving season on #GivingTuesday.Beginning this week, we’re offering a combination of free and client-only resources to get your team ready. We’re arming ALL nonprofits with the tools, tactics, training and motivation to make this your best December ever.And for Network for Good clients, we’ll also be offering:• Two great platforms: • DonateNow – your customized online giving page to maximize donor conversion• GiveCorps – a cutting-edge giving platform that offers donors a superior online giving experience, plus crowdfunding and peer-to-peer.• Exclusive toolkits, expert webinars, specialized coaching, and communications resources• Matching funds to make your gifts go further• Visibility with Network for Good donors What’s the first step? Start by downloading our comprehensive Giving Days eBook. According to nonprofit thought leader Beth Kanter, it’s a “terrific, free eBook with lots of tips and planning templates to help your organization decide whether to participate.”Then every Tuesday, we’ll bring you new resources to get ready for #GivingTuesday.It’s time to plan for your best December ever!Ready to get started? Our team can help you get your site ready for #GivingTuesday. Set up a time talk with a fundraising consultant today and get a free demo.last_img read more

The PartoPen: Working to Increase the Effectiveness of the Partograph

first_imgPosted on August 10, 2012Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to email this to a friend (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window)Our colleagues at Maternova recently highlighted on their innovation index a new tool (that is currently in development) that aims to increase the effectiveness of the partograph. The PartoPen is being developed by University of Colorado-Boulder Ph.D candidate Heather Underwood.According to Maternova’s innovation index:Using an infrared camera, the pen takes picture of dots that are pre-printed on the paper that act as GPS coordinates for the pen. The pen provides real-time feedback for:     · Decision support: Based on location of the pen on graph, the pen will provide next steps     · Reminders: Auto-reminders of time and procedure     · Error Checking: ex. Recording a temperature in F vs. C, pen recognizes the errorThe digital partograph system provides real-time data feedback and reinforces birth attendant training, while retaining the paper-and-pen interface currently used by most healthcare workers. The system is currently being evaluated in Kenya.This project received a $100,000 Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation grant to develop and implement the technology.Learn more about this new tool from Maternova here.More information:Visit the PartoPen site.Access several documents about the partograph in the MHTF Library. (Just enter “partograph” in the search box!)Read a number of blog posts about the partograph on the MHTF Blog.Share this: ShareEmailPrint To learn more, read:last_img read more

Resource Tool: Human Resources for Health

first_imgPosted on July 17, 2014November 2, 2016By: Katie Millar, Technical Writer, Women and Health Initiative, Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public HealthClick to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to email this to a friend (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window)This post is part of our “Supporting the Human in Human Resources” blog series co-hosted by the Maternal Health Task Force and Jacaranda Health.To enrich the “Supporting the Human in Human Resources” blog series, a round-up of recent literature on the subject is here aggregated as a useful tool for public health practitioners. Let us know how these articles are helpful and about other human resource topics that interest you.Landmark articles:Systematic Review on Human Resources for Health Interventions to Improve Maternal Health Outcomes: Evidence from Developing CountriesHUMAN RESOURCES FOR HEALTH: foundation for Universal Health Coverage and the post-2015 development agendaHuman resources for maternal, newborn and child health: from measurement and planning to performance for improved health outcomesHuman resources for maternal health: multi-purpose or specialists?Recent Publications:Time to address gender discrimination and inequality in the health workforceFactors affecting motivation and retention of primary health care workers in three disparate regions in KenyaTask-shifting and prioritization: a situational analysis examining the role and experiences of community health workers in MalawiHRM and its effect on employee, organizational and financial outcomes in health care organizationsHope and despair: community health assistants’ experiences of working in a rural district in ZambiaReaching Mothers and Babies with Early Postnatal Home Visits: The Implementation Realities of Achieving High Coverage in Large-Scale ProgramsCommunity Health Workers in Low-, Middle-, and High-Income Countries: An Overview of Their History, Recent Evolution, and Current EffectivenessHome visits by community health workers to prevent neonatal deaths in developing countries: a systematic reviewExpansion in the private sector provision of institutional delivery services and horizontal equity: evidence from Nepal and BangladeshPerformance-based incentives to improve health status of mothers and newborns: what does the evidence show?Building capacity to develop an African teaching platform on health workforce development: a collaborative initiative of universities from four sub Saharan countriesRetention of female volunteer community health workers in Dhaka urban slums: a prospective cohort studyShare this: ShareEmailPrint To learn more, read:last_img read more

9 Super Scary Nonprofit Website Mistakes

first_imgYour website lacks details about your nonprofit’s mission and vision.Why is your organization the nonprofit to support? What are you doing that’s different from others? Simply put, what makes your nonprofit stand out? It’s important that the answers to these questions are easy to find on your website! By spelling out your mission and vision, donors can easily understand what their donations will accomplish. Your website doesn’t feature your nonprofit’s latest news.Create (or maintain) a place on your organization’s to share your latest news and examples of your most recent content, such as interesting articles, upcoming events, and special projects. This type of content works well on a blog and you can also link to this content on social media and in your newsletter. Your website doesn’t feature endorsements and third-party reviews.Make sure your website includes ratings from GuideStar and Charity Navigator or a testimonial from a stakeholder. The effectiveness of your websites’ messages depends on the messenger. Let others help build your case and show that you are trustworthy. Your website doesn’t have social media links or a newsletter sign up.Social media is a key way to connect and communicate with supporters. Be sure that all those hours tweeting and blogging don’t go to waste: Provide links to your social media profiles and make it easy for supporters to see your content and share on their social media channel of choice.  If a new fan isn’t the social media type, an email newsletter is a great way to help them keep in touch. That’s why it’s important that your newsletter sign-up process is simple and seamless. Your website isn’t mobile-friendly.Take a moment to evaluate your website’s usability for mobile users. Open your website on a mobile device. Are your donation page and website easy to navigate on a tablet or phone? Your website’s content uses too many words to demonstrate your work.As the saying goes, a picture is worth a thousand words. Pictures of people who benefitted from your services or volunteers in action can demonstrate your mission, illustrate the impact of your work, and complement your website’s text. Again, people’s attention spans are short. A compelling image will capture visitors’ attention and tell a story in a better way than multiple paragraphs of text.center_img Your website’s navigation doesn’t make sense.Your website should be organized according to the expectations of the people who come to your website. Instead of thinking how to present the information you want people to find, make it easy for your visitors to find the information they want. Back by popular demand to help you get ready for #GivingTuesday and Year-End -enjoy!Boo! That’s your website scaring you into reality. And the reality is that people’s short attention spans mean your website needs to provide visitors with easy access to everything in just three clicks. It must grab visitors’ attention, provide information, and spur visitors to action.Here are nine super scary website mistakes you should address before the year-end giving season is here and donors are too frightened to use your website!  Don’t wait…these website mistakes can result in the biggest horror of all: missing out on donations in December!Your website doesn’t have contact information.Make sure it’s easy for website users (and potential donors) to find your organization’s phone number, email address, or contact form. Also, make sure staff members know how to handle donor inquiries. Your website doesn’t have a clear ask for donations.Don’t be afraid to ask for donations on your website. Isn’t that the whole point of fundraising? Supporters will appreciate that you’ve made it easy for them to donate, so make that button shine! Network for Good always recommends you make the button big, bold and above “the scroll”. Plus, a smarter donation page will help you get donors to give, give big, and give again. Take advantage of our accredited Personal Fundraising Coaches to get hands-on help with your year-end fundraising activities. Schedule a call to learn more today.last_img read more

The Long History of Poverty and Health: Promoting Equity in the Fight for Improved Maternal and Child Survival

first_img ShareEmailPrint To learn more, read: Posted on October 14, 2015October 13, 2016By: Julianne Weis, Maternal Health ConsultantClick to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to email this to a friend (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window)Sustainable Development Goal 10, to reduce inequality within and among countries, stands out as one of the most pressing and challenging obstacles of our generation. Since the Alma Ata Declaration was signed in 1978, countries have struggled to provide primary health care in an equitable manner. Communities in poverty are consistently excluded from national and global health programming, and we cannot discuss an improvement in maternal and child health without dealing squarely with the problem of inequity.Dr. Ulla Larsson in Ethiopia saw this problem head-on when she led a mobile maternal and child health clinic in Addis Ababa. The clinic focused on low-income communities and provided vaccinations for children, basic ante-natal consultation and health education programming in the form of lectures on adequate sanitation and nutrition practices. As part of the public health programming, the organization handed out free powdered milk supplies from UNICEF to mothers to supplement their children’s diets. The mobile clinic was well attended, until the powdered milk supplies ran out. Suddenly, mothers stopped coming to the lectures.Why did women stop attending a health clinic when they no longer received milk supplements? The answer is simple: poverty. Dr. Larsson lamented that the educational mission of her mobile clinic failed, but how were her patients expected to appropriate the lessons of the health curriculum without a change in their means or livelihood? Women could not afford to give their children more nutritious food, especially without the handout of milk. So there was little purpose in attending a lecture on improving child nutrition when they had no means to do so.The story of Dr. Larsson’s clinic is actually very old: the clinic operated in Addis in the late 1960s, but the impact of poverty on maternal health choices has remained a persistent problem. Too often, RMNCH programming, especially information and sensitization campaigns, neglect the impact of livelihood constraints on women’s health seeking behaviors.Dr. Asfaw Desta, a 50-year veteran of public health education and policy planning in Ethiopia, has learned this lesson time and again in his decades of experience in public service. He explained to me that as public health educators, while “we tell people to use soap to wash and be cleaner, and nutritional advice to eat better, they used to say: ‘We know that, give us the means and we can provide ourselves with the soap and nutritional foods you’re talking about.’ The means. It was very challenging to hear people say that. When you tell them about what to do – they know what to do, but they don’t have the means.”Moving forward into the next phase of post-MDG programming, we must learn from the past, and avoid the repeated mistakes of expecting health policies to operate the same across different economic classes. The promotion of equity through poverty reduction (SDG #1) is paramount in the fight for improved maternal health. Further, if we are going to reduce the global maternal mortality ratio to less than 70 per 100,000 live births by 2030 (SDG #3.1), there is a need to target programming to the poorest women who are traditionally excluded from health services. At the upcoming Global Maternal Newborn Health Conference, discussions must focus on the poorest women, and their unique financial and non-financial barriers to accessing maternal health services. We cannot expect mothers to radically improve their health and nutrition status without providing them the means to do so.Photo: “Ethiopia 3” © 2012 Swathi Sridharan/ICRISAT, used under a Creative Commons Attribution license: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0/Share this:last_img read more

The Charleville initiative

first_imgAt the request of Arunachal Pradesh Chief Minister Pema Khandu, an Arunachal Study Group has been conceptualised at the Academy to look at issues concerning the capacity building of officers of Arunachal, understand the unique potential and diversity of the state in almost every respect – language, religion, culture, agro climes, hydel, natural and renewable resources, flora, fauna, birds, mammals, butterflies, besides challenges from the 1000 km border with China which contests the integration of the state with the Indian Union. One will not write about this – for reams have been written on this aspect, and usually, the discussion terminates with the assertion that Arunachal is indeed a state of the Indian Union, which leads the North East in many parameters of development. The initiative about this came from Jitender Kumar, an IAS officer of the AGMUT cadre when he was attending the Phase V program at the Academy. So, while this dispatch is not written at Charleville, it was conceptualised there! Also Read – A special kind of bondOne must mention here that there’s a strong Charleville connection with the state. Six decades ago, in the year of 1959, the Academy moved from the Metcalfe House in Delhi to Mussorie, and His Holiness the Dalai Lama established the first Tibetan settlement in India after having fled to the Tawang Monastery in Arunachal (then NEFA) to avoid persecution from the Chinese who had occupied Tibet. The Tawang monastery is in the Monpa area, bordering Bhutan to the west and is a centre of Lamaistic Buddhism. The middle range of Arunachal has the Tani and Mishmi areas, while Singhpo, Naga and Yobin areas border Myanmar to the East and Nagaland and Assam to the south. Also Read – Insider threat managementIn between there are transition zones such as the Bugun aka Hruso, Miji and Sherdukpen – these are the cultural buffers between Lamaism and Doniyo Polo (translated: the sun and the moon) – the shamanic and animistic belief systems.The Chief Minister and his team had a frank and candid discussion with our group which included Special Director Manoj Ahuja and we agreed that LBSNAA would conduct a training needs analysis for the civil and senior technical services of Arunachal, especially with regard to skills on project formulation and monitoring, leadership and team-building with focus on the potential drivers of Arunachal’s economy: tourism, hydropower, horticulture and handicrafts. The road to Arunachal, as indeed to most places in the Northeast, is via Kolkata and/or Guwahati, and your columnist spent a day at Kolkata – visiting the National Library, the ATI, the NUJS and had an interesting interaction with the executive committee members of the Indian Chambers of Commerce. The National Library is supposed to be the repository of all books published in the country, however, fulfilling this mandate requires professional leadership, administrative competence, political will backed with financial muscle – all of which require a reboot. The Academy is keen to seek their technical support and assistance in becoming the National Reference library for writings on and by civil servants, as well as on governance. The Academy has taken up a project under the title “The making of a Nation” to document all publications by and on civil servants/civil services and governance to understand how India has evolved from an outpost of the Empire to a G-20 nation with global ambitions and aspirations. This is taken from the title of Surendra Nath Banerjee’s publication A Nation in the Making, published in 1925. Banerjee’s contribution to nation-building has not received the attention it deserves – not only was he one of the first ICS officers who had to quit quite early in his career on account of racial discrimination, he was also an influential journalist, the President of the Indian National Congress, the Mayor of Kolkata and an inspiration for a generation of leaders of the freedom movement, especially before the advent of Mahatma Gandhi who transformed the Congress from an influential debating forum to a mass movement. The sessions at the ATI and NUJS were basically interactions with the civil service aspirants clearing their queries about the exams, and discussing the myriad possibilities in the civil services. There were many apprehensions about the selection process and the respective roles of the UPSC and the Academy in the determination of services, as well as inter-state seniority. It is always a delight to respond to questions of the aspirants as well as explaining to them that while governance depends on a positive rapport between the political leadership and the permanent executive, there are fairly well-established norms and conventions of what can and ought to be done. The relationship had to be professional – officers were expected to follow the rules and uphold the law but the discretion to amend the laws was vested with the political executive, and this too was subject to judicial scrutiny. Laws could not go against the ‘fundamental nature and the essential spirit of the Constitution. The session at Indian Chambers was also very interesting where your columnist sparred with economist Onkar Goswami on the role of bureaucracy in the budget exercise. His argument was that the bureaucracy was responsible for creating the Trust deficit which made it difficult for the entrepreneurs to expand their business. Your columnist’s view was that the budget was essentially a political statement and that the democratically elected political executive had every right to send whatever signals it wanted to convey. Moreover, the budget-making process was fairly participatory and the memoranda and submissions presented by the Industry chambers and trade associations were also factored in the budget-making process. (Dr. Sanjeev Chopra is Director, LBSNAA, Mussoorie, and Honorary Curator, Valley of Words: Literature and Arts Festival, Dehradun. The views expressed are strictly personal)last_img read more

With Runners On Base Joey Votto Lets Too Many Good Chances Go

Near the end of last season, Cincinnati Enquirer writer Paul Daugherty penned a column about Reds first baseman Joey Votto. It was not kind.You can extol the virtues of the almighty walk all you like. You can tell me how wonderful it is that Votto makes fewer outs than anyone. I understand all that, and it is all good. Especially if you’re leading off or batting 2nd. If you are batting 3rd, your responsibilities are different. Seventy-three RBI with Choo ahead of you all year is substandard. All numbers aside, Votto doesn’t pass the eyeball test this summer. There have been times when he simply looks disengaged.This might seem like stinging criticism, particularly the part where Daugherty jumps from Votto’s RBI total to accusing the Reds star of checking out. Thing is, select members of Cincinnati’s baseball media corps often bash Votto for being too passive — especially when he comes up with runners on base. Marty Brennaman, the radio voice of the Reds for the past 40 years, seems to do it all the time. That September 2013 column wasn’t remotely the only time Daugherty called out Votto. The idea of Votto as this submissive hitter who keeps his bat on his shoulder during RBI opportunities has become so widespread that even the Cardinals announcers brought it up when the Reds visited St. Louis last month. And as far as the eyeball test goes, well, it’s tough to watch Votto do something like this (on a 2-1 count, no less), and not shake your head a little:That mid-at-bat stroll aside, is the narrative true? Is Votto hurting his team by turning into a wallflower when he gets chances to drive in runs? Or is this just another case of blaming a team’s best player for its failures?Votto defenders, and Votto himself, argue that indiscriminately swinging at more pitches would hurt more than it would help. Votto’s elite batting puts him at or near the top of the league in walk rate every year. It also helps him avoid making weak contact on pitches out of the strike zone; since his 2008 rookie season, no qualified hitter has been better at getting on base (and thus not making outs) than Votto has.So rather than pointing to simple walk rate or swing rate, we turned to ESPN’s TruMedia system for context. It slices and dices stats in countless ways, to the point where we can see how often Votto swings at pitches in the strike zone with runners in scoring position. That way, we can focus on the situations most conducive to knocking in runs and eliminate pitches out of the zone, which you’d want hitters to pass up anyway.We came up with three ways to dissect this stat. First, we can see how often Votto swings at strikes when at bat with runners in scoring position, and whether he’s doing it more or less now than he has in the past. We can also compare Votto’s swing rate in those situations with those of other elite hitters. TruMedia data goes back to 2009, and Votto ranks third in the majors since ’09 in weighted runs created plus,1Also known as wRC+, this stat tallies all the walks, singles, doubles, triples, homers, outs and other outcomes compiled by a hitter — minus context-dependent stats like RBI — then adjusts for park effects and the era in which a player plays and boils it down to one number. A score of 100 is average for a major league hitter, which means Votto’s 162 wRC+ since 2009 pegs him at 62 percent better than average. so comparing Votto to the rest of the top five in that stat over the past half-decade makes sense. Finally, we can see how often Votto swings in these spots relative to league average.The chart below tells the tale.At first glance, yes, Votto has become much less aggressive with runners in scoring position over the past five-plus seasons. In 2009, his second full season in the big leagues, Votto swung at 78.2 percent of the pitches he saw in the strike zone with RISP, ranking him 10th among 155 qualified batters, just slightly behind the grip-it-and-rip-it approach of RBI-machine Miguel Cabrera. Votto’s number dipped slightly to 76.2 percent in 2010, still ranking among the league’s leaders. In 2011, that number fell precipitously to 69.6 percent, just a smidgen above league average. In 2012, it took another big tumble, with Votto’s swing rate plunging to 62.4 percent — No. 121 in the majors if he’d had enough at-bats to qualify for the batting title. Last year, he rebounded to 69.8 percent, once again a tick above league average. So far this season, the bottom has dropped out, with Votto swinging at just 57.7 percent of pitches in the strike zone with runners in scoring position, ranking him 171st among 187 qualified hitters. Those last 16 guys probably batted with their eyes closed.Now let’s compare Votto to other elite hitters. Placing him side by side with those other top-five wRC+ guys — Cabrera, Mike Trout, Ryan Braun and Jose Bautista — nets surprising results. While Cabrera and Braun rank among baseball’s most aggressive hitters when they get pitches with runners in scoring position, Trout and Bautista have been far more passive … more so even than Votto, before this year.Let’s run one more chart. Same hitters, same runners in scoring position situations, still using pitches in the strike zone, only this time we’ll look at fastballs only, since in theory you’d expect hitters to be more aggressive against heaters than, say, darting sliders or diving change-ups.Same pattern, but check out Votto’s free fall this season. On fastballs in the strike zone with RISP, he’s swung an incredibly low 50 percent of the time, ranking 182 out of 187 batters.So what’s going on here?Leaving RBI aside, Votto’s power numbers have shrunk a lot over the past couple of years. Since his 37-homer MVP season in 2010, Votto has hit 29, 14 and 24 bombs, with just four so far this year. Using isolated power, a stat that gives a better read of a player’s pop than slugging average since it focuses only on extra-base hits, we see that Votto posted a career-low .186 IP mark last year, ranking a less-than-elite 44th among 140 qualified batters. He’s down to .169 IP this year, just the 72nd-best mark in the majors. If a hitter feels he can do less damage when he swings, he’s probably going to swing less often. Votto is one of the brainiest, most self-aware players in the game, so it’s no surprise to see him swinging less often than he has in the past, both with runners in scoring position and the rest of the time.It’s hard to tell how aggressive Votto might be in the future, given what the numbers tell us. Go back and peruse those charts again. The two biggest drops in his swing rate (with runners in scoring position or otherwise) — and the only two times in his career that he’s been more passive than league average in RBI situations — have come in 2012 and this year.In 2012, Votto suffered a painful knee injury, one that sapped his power dramatically until it knocked him out of the lineup for 50 games; of course he’s going to swing less often when he’s both playing in pain and not hitting the ball as hard when he makes contact. As for this year, it’s May 9. Votto has seen only 52 pitches in the strike zone with runners in scoring position, and just 36 of those were fastballs. We should probably wait until we have a larger sample of at-bats before we break out Tom Smykowski’s mat.So yes, Daugherty’s belief that Votto has become more passive passes not only the eyeball test, but also the hard evidence test. Still, Votto doesn’t deserve this much criticism. We’re talking about a player who’s on track to reach base more than 40 percent of the time for the sixth straight season. He’s an excellent defender at first. An infield popup for him is like a Halley’s Comet sighting for the rest of us. And while he might be swinging less often than he used to, even that trend might prove to be much less pronounced than it looks right now.Joey Votto remains one of the best all-around players on the planet, whether or not he ever makes the ghost of Hack Wilson sweat. read more

Football Ohio State honors 19 seniors in final home game of the

Ohio State quarterback J.T. Barrett is honored on the field for Senior Day. Credit: Jack Westerheide | Photo EditorThe Ohio State home fans watched as 19 seniors took the field of Ohio Stadium for the final time Saturday as the group of players were recognized individually just before kickoff of its game against Illinois.Each senior ran out of the tunnel to receive a hug from head coach Urban Meyer and deliver flowers to his parents. Fans cheer on QB @JT_theQB4th as he takes the field one last time in Ohio Stadium. #OSUvsIllinois pic.twitter.com/oFMWsveejZ— Lantern TV (@LanternTV) November 18, 2017On the offensive side of the ball, Ohio State saw quarterbacks J.T. Barrett and Stephen Collier, center Billy Price, left tackle Jamarco Jones, tight end Marcus Baugh and wide receiver Elijaah Goins.On the defensive side of the ball, cornerbacks Trevon Forte and Cin’Quan Haney, defensive tackles Tracy Sprinkle and Michael Hill, defensive lineman Nick Seme, defensive end Tyquan Lewis, safeties Damon Webb, Clay Raterman and Erick Smith and linebackers Jackson Hayes, Zach Turnure and Chris Worley.One of the most decorated players in Ohio State football history, quarterback J.T. Barrett runs onto the field at Ohio Stadium for the final time. pic.twitter.com/sIslwCFPLD— Lantern Sports (@LanternSports) November 18, 2017 read more

Wrestling Ohio State opens season with 289 win over Navy

Ohio State’s Myles Martin wrestles Mitch Bowman in the dual-meet against Iowa on Jan. 21 in the Schottenstein Center. Credit: Jack Westerheide | Managing Editor for DesignIn the first match following the losses of some of the greatest wrestlers to ever come through the program, Kyle Snyder, Nathan Tomasello and Bo Jordan, Ohio State opened the season with a dominant victory over Navy on Saturday. Senior Myles Martin said at media day earlier this week he’s never felt better headed into a season before, and he is looking forward to “literally every single match.” The 184-pounder looked like he meant every word when it was his turn to take the mats, as he was able to get 10 different takedowns and get a technical fall midway through the second period, winning 21-6.Ohio State 157-pound redshirt junior Ke-Shawn Hayes, got things started  with a 3-1 come-from-behind victory over Navy’s Connor Prince. Heading into the third period, Hayes elected to start from the bottom position and, in doing so, was able to get a quick escape. He was then able to trip Prince, before getting a takedown and winning the match. Redshirt freshman Kaleb Romero made his Buckeye debut and, like his teammate Hayes, was able to make magic happen in the third. Romero was able to shoot for a double-leg takedown with just eight seconds left to win 3-2 .Senior Te’Shan Campbell used his signature tilt two different times in his match, notching six points, hanging on to a smaller 8-5 lead for a decisive victory.  Redshirt sophomore Kevin Snyder was the first Buckeye unable to pull off the victory on Saturday. After a 1-0 start for Navy’s Joshua Roetman, who did a great job of defending Snyder’s takedowns, he was able to catch Snyder in a cradle to cap off the fall at 3:39 for the win.Navy got its second victory of the night in the 125-pound weight class when Jacob Allen defeated Ohio State sophomore Brakan Mead in a decision victory, 5-4. This drew Navy closer, with the total score now 17-9. Ohio State 133-pound junior Luke Pletcher of the Buckeyes started to build off his 2017-18 campaign, grinding out a 7-4 decision to bring Ohio State up 20-9. Ohio State senior and captain Joey McKenna was able to battle hard for a low-scoring 3-2 victory over Navy’s Nicholas Gil. McKenna rode him out for the entirety of the third and final period to achieve a riding point, and receive a 3-2 nod. Ohio State increased their total lead to 23-9 with one match remaining. To wrap the dual up, it was the No. 2 wrestler in the country at 149 pounds, Micah Jordan, battling No. 19, Navy’s Jared Prince. This bout was entirely one-sided, as Jordan came  up with a 16-1 tech fall for the victory. Ohio State’s next match will be on Nov. 11 in the Ohio Intercollegiate Open in Cleveland, Ohio. read more

Mouth To Mouth Wild Run Ride Hits The Beach On Memorial Day

first_imgFacebook0TwitterEmailPrintFriendly分享The 6th Annual Mouth to Mouth Wild Run & Ride is scheduled for Memorial Day Monday, May 27. 10-Mile Mouth to Mouth Wild Run & RideThe 2019 Mouth to Mouth Wild Run & Ride includes a 1-mile beach run or fat bike ride between Kasilof River mouth and the mouth of the Kenai River.  Day of event registration opens at noon.  Race time is set for 2 p.m.The race start will be located at the Kasilof River Special Use Area off Kasilof Beach Stub Rd and the finish line at the Kenai South Beach parking lot off Cannery Rd.Early registration is available for $30 ($25 for Cook Inlet Keepers members) and day of event registration is $40. 3-Mile Fun Run EventIn addition, a 3-mile beach run from Cannery Road beach to the Kenai River mouth and return will begin at 3 p.m. on Monday.   Start time for the 3-mile run is 3 p.m. at Cannery Road beach access off Dunes Road.last_img read more

Local Nonprofit Addresses Need for Black Girls in STEM Field

first_imgIn an effort to help African American girls succeed in science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM), a local nonprofit joined other women in the field on two panels to answer specific need-to-know questions at the USA Science & Engineering Festival April 26-27 at the Walter E. Washington Convention Center in Northwest D.C.“When we’re talking about teaching Black girls the professional and life skills that are going to help them succeed, having not just an understanding of ‘oh, I can be a chemical engineer or a geneticist,’ but an everyday interaction with technology is going to be incredibly key for them,” Kat Calvin, founder of Michelle in Training told the AFRO.She said the nonprofit incorporates STEM by making sure the girls are using computers and by making sure they attend workshops.“They’ve worked on robotics now and they’ve learned about coding,” Calvin said. “[We’re] incorporating STEM into everything that we do with them.”Michelle in Training oversees 10 girls from Dunbar High School in Northwest D.C.For the last two years, the group has met on the weekends to attend courses or workshops that have something to do with STEM. She said the nonprofit also tries to introduce the girls to several professional Black women in all fields.“They’re starting to see that there are a lot more opportunities,” she said.Professionals on the “Women in Technology” panels included Calvin, Tracy Chou, a software engineer at social media site Pinterest; Liza Conrad, development manager at Girls Who Code; and Reshma Saujani, founder and Chief Executive Officer of Girls Who Code. Sandy Samuel and Sharon Watts from Lockheed Martin moderated the panels.Moderators chose girls from the audience to spin a large wheel on the Lockheed Martin stage at the Festival and then the girls chose one of the panelists to answer their question. Questions on the field were also taken from members in the audience.One question from a member in the audience addressed how to fill the workforce gap in the STEM field with women workers.Calvin replied that she first realized the importance of STEM when she got her first Iphone. “Technology went from being something that I went to for particular purposes to being a part of my everyday life, every second of every moment.”“Girls more and more just need to see that there is nothing on earth that you can do that you don’t need STEM for, so you need to make it a part of your life,” she said.Chou said that including more women in the STEM field was a pipeline problem. She and Conrad said that a big part in getting more women was to get more girls interested in STEM at an early age.“One thing we found to at Girls Who Code is…getting girls interested when they’re young but creating an ecosystem in which they’re going to thrive,” Conrad said.last_img read more

Rep Poleski pleased to see roads settled

first_img Categories: News 05Nov Rep. Poleski pleased to see roads settled State Rep. Earl Poleski voted in favor of yesterday’s passed road funding package that calls for a 50/50 split between existing funds and new revenue, relying on $600 million from each.The passed plan is intended to keep fees and increases modest while reducing annual car repair costs for Michigan drivers and is specially designed decrease the state income tax rate as inflation increases over time.“I’m pleased we were able to reach an agreement on roads,” said state Rep. Earl Poleski, R-Jackson. “This multi-year funding plan ensures dollars budgeted for roads are spent responsibly, and that the materials and processes used to build and maintain them are effectively measured—resulting in safer, high-quality roads for our state.”The package provides $200 million in tax relief by expanding the Homestead Property Tax Credit for middle-class families, low-income residents and seniors across the state.The new plan also includes an amendment from the Senate that decreases registration fee increases from 40 percent to 20 percent and increases the gas tax 7.3 cents per gallon.The road-funding plan now moves to the governor’s desk for further consideration.###last_img read more

Italys antitrust regulator has ordered an investi

first_imgItaly’s antitrust regulator has ordered an investigation into the circumstances surrounding the division of Serie A football rights between Sky and Mediaset for the 2015-18 seasons, according to local reports.Sky and Mediaset are suspected of colluding to carve up the rights, freezing out rivals including Discovery-owned Eurosport.Last year Mediaset at the last minute secured DTT rights to the matches of leading teams in the face of what it saw as a threat to allocate both major packages on offer to Sky. Serie A clubs agreed to allocate package A, with exclusive satellite rights to the matches of the eight leading teams to Sky, while package B, with DTT rights, went to Mediaset along with a package covering the matches of the 12 remaining teams.In a statement, Mediaset said that the deal had been approved by regulator AgCom at the time. It said that no alternative broadcaster had submitted a bid above the price threshold for each package at the time, and that therefore such players could not have been discriminated against. It also argued that the sale of both major packages to a single player – such as Sky – would have been against the rules governing the central sale of rights.last_img read more

Crabs ten brands list – the whole

hairy crabs, is not a mention of such a delicious food, a lot of people will swallow it? Indeed, the current favorite hairy crabs are very many people, the following, let Xiaobian to introduce the ten major brands of crabs list, so that we can have a better understanding of the crab market brand.

NO.1 list of ten brands of crabs, Yangcheng Lake: agricultural leading enterprises in Jiangsu Province, Suzhou crabs Industry Association unit, Suzhou Yangcheng Lake Modern Agriculture Industrial Park special aquaculture Co. ltd.. read more