MCGUINNESS NAMES UNCHANGED SIDE BUT THE BENCH COULD BE HIS SECRET WEAPON

first_imgDespite injury doubts to Paddy McGrath and Michael Hegarty, manager Jim McGuinness has set out an unchanged Donegal side for the All-Ireland semi-final clash with Dublin.McGrath had to be withdrawn before half-time in the victory over Kildare in the quarter-final with a hamstring problem, while Hegarty has been troubled by a knee injury of late.Hegarty came through a full training session on Tuesday night and is almost certain to start, but the situation regarding McGrath is less clear cut. If he fails to prove his fitness in time for Sunday, his place will likely be taken by Eamon Magee, who did well when introduced for McGrath against the Lilywhites.In that game, Jim McGuinness had named captain Michael Murphy in his first XV although he was suffering from a hamstring injury.Murphy started the game on the bench, but was introduced in the first half and wreaked havoc in the Kildare defence but is believed to be in top form for tomorrow’s clash.Elsewhere, the team remains unchanged, although Leo McLoone is included on the bench after recovering from a facial injury suffered in a club game earlier this summer. McGuinness is again expected to rely heavily on his bench as he plots Dublin’s downfall through a series of tactical switches.Donegal’s clash with Dublin throws in at Croke Park on Sunday at 3.30pm.Donegal: P Durcan; P McGrath, N McGee, F McGlynn; A Thompson, K Lacey, K Cassidy; R Kavanagh, N Gallagher; M McHugh, M Hegarty, R Bradley; P McBrearty, M Murphy, C McFadden.

Subs: M Boyle, E McGee, M Boyle, D Molloy, D Walsh, M McElhinney, S Griffin, J Noctor, C Toye, K Rafferty, L McLoone.MCGUINNESS NAMES UNCHANGED SIDE BUT THE BENCH COULD BE HIS SECRET WEAPON was last modified: August 26th, 2011 by StephenShare this:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to share on Pocket (Opens in new window)Click to share on Telegram (Opens in new window)Click to share on WhatsApp (Opens in new window)Click to share on Skype (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window) Tags:donegalJim McGuinnesslast_img read more

HC dismisses plea challenging cancellation of ‘atheist’ certificate

first_imgThe Punjab and Haryana High Court has dismissed a petition of a youth from Haryana who challenged the cancellation of his “atheist” certificate by the State government after it had been issued to him by a local official earlier. Justice Tejinder Singh Dhindsa, while dismissing the petition, observed that if the petitioner has chosen a path of an atheist and doesn’t believe in any caste or class, there would be no requirement in law for him to be issued a certificate to such effect.The court held that undoubtedly, the freedom of conscience under Article 25 of the Constitution encompasses in itself a freedom to an individual to take a view that he does not belong to any religion.Individual rights“The freedom conferred by Article 25 of the Constitution would also include a right of an individual to claim that he is an ‘atheist’. Just as a freedom of conscience confers a fundamental right to a citizen to entertain a particular religious belief, it equally confers a right on any other individual-citizen to express an opinion that he does not belong to any religion,” said the court.The petitioner, Ravi Kumar Atheist, had approached the court challenging the cancellation of the “atheist” certificate which was issued to him by the Naib Tehsildar, Tohana of district Fatehabad in Haryana. The certificate issued on April 29, 2019 certified that the petitioner was an atheist and does not belong to any caste, religion and does not believe in God. However, on May 4, 2019 the certificate was cancelled.The court said that even if any such certificate had been issued by the Naib Tehsildar concerned and the same was subsequently cancelled, it would be of no consequence.last_img read more

Hazard: I want to work with Mourinho again

first_imgEden Hazard has revealed that he wants to work under Manchester United manager Jose Mourinho again.Hazard played for the Portuguese for two years at Chelsea, between 2013 and 2015, before Mourinho was sacked.Nevertheless, he won the Premier League title and the League Cup in his second spell at Stamford Bridge, with Hazard a key member of the title-winning side, scoring 14 league goals and providing 10 assists. Article continues below Editors’ Picks Man Utd ready to spend big on Sancho and Haaland in January Who is Marcus Thuram? Lilian’s son who is top of the Bundesliga with Borussia Monchengladbach Brazil, beware! Messi and Argentina out for revenge after Copa controversy Best player in MLS? Zlatan wasn’t even the best player in LA! A poor second season led to Mourinho’s sacking, however, with his Belgian star struggling for form – he scored just four goals in the league.Mourinho is again under the microscope, this time at Manchester United, with the club already seven points behind the Blues and Manchester City.Hazard, though, maintains that he regrets how their professional ties ended, and would like to play for him again.“The last season under Mourinho was not pleasant anymore. We didn’t win, we got into a sort of routine, training-training without having fun, it was better for all parties that the collaboration came to an end,” he told Belgian newspaper HLN.”If I’m now asked one coach with whom I want to work again, then I say: Mourinho.”Eden Hazard Jose MourinhoHazard admits that Mourinho can lash out at his players if results begin to slide, and he believes there is one easy way to get him on side: by winning.“If the results are poor, he starts criticising his players – you know that, but afterwards I’ve been able to accept that, it’s part of his character,” he added.“If you win, Mourinho is the best coach you can imagine. Then he is a friend of yours – you can do whatever you want. Want one day off? He gives you two. If everything goes well, Mourinho will experience football like me: with ease. Even his own image of an extremely defensive coach was not too bad. He is far from adventurous like [Pep] Guardiola, but the year in which we became champions, we scored a lot of goals and played good games.“I do not regret many things in my career, but that I have not been able to work with Mourinho at Chelsea anymore [is one]. We had a team to get a lot of prizes, but we just ended up in a negative spiral.”During Mourinho’s final months at Chelsea, Hazard’s form was held up as emblematic that he struggles to bring the best out of players who are creative, but the Belgian has taken responsibility for his own shortcomings.“In those twelve years of professional career, I have had one bad year – the last six months under Mourinho, and it was partly my own fault,” he said.”After the title, we had asked Mourinho for extra holidays. I was totally out of shape at the start of the season, I remembered that lesson this summer – four weeks after the World Cup I was back in training at Chelsea.”last_img read more

Must-know Neuro-Nudges for Nonprofits

first_imgNetwork for Good is hosting a free webinar this Thursday, March 14 at 1 p.m. ET on neuromarketing – a topic definitely worth your time!The urge to help and give is hard-wired into the human brain. As a champion for a cause, it’s your task to tap into those recesses by appealing to that urge. The simplest things – images, words, gestures, even type fonts – can have a major effect on the potency of your message. Neuromarketing expert, Roger Dooley, has discovered some brain-science-based tweaks you can make to your print, web, and in-person outreach that will boost the effectiveness of your marketing efforts. Join Roger Dooley for this free event as he makes neuromarketing easy for nonprofits. Register here.last_img read more

How to Make the Case for Social Media

first_img Remember: This isn’t a crusade, it’s a learning experience for everyone. Make sure there IS a good case for your initiative and if it does fail, share and learn from what went wrong. There is no shame in gaining knowledge from mistakes – for you, or your boss. 1. Change the subject. If you’re having a debate over the value of social media, you’re having the wrong discussion. The discussion should be about your organization’s goals – with social media being the means, not the end. 2. Make it about what your boss already wants. Don’t position your idea as a social media initiative; frame it as your initiative to support your boss’s goals, in your boss’s language. Is donor retention a big concern for your Executive Director? Highlight how social media can help keep donors engaged. Does your board want more success stories to showcase? Underscore how social media can help make that happen. 3. Make it about the audience. A good way to depersonalize the debate over social media is to make it about your target audience’s preferences rather than a philosophical tug of war between you and said boss. 4. Sign your boss up to listen.Set up Google Alerts and TweetBeep (email alerts for Twitter mentions) for your boss, so she or he can see that there are already many discussions about your organization happening online. Once this apparent, two things are likely to happen. First, it will become clear that your organization no longer controls your message online – so worrying about social media causing a lack of control is not worth fearing. That day is already here. Second, it will be hard not to want to join those conversations online – which is what social engagement is all about. 5. Set some ground rules. Set a social media policy for your organization, so it’s clear how to respond to what you’re hearing – and what types of initiatives have internal support. 6. Start small. If you’re going to start a social media initiative, start small. Pinpoint where your supporters are and branch out from there. You don’t have to be an overnight social media expert – you just need to be a part of the conversations about your cause. 7. Set a clear goal.Just as with any other marketing effort, establish a specific, measurable goal so you can identify success. 8. Measure and report.Once you’ve identified your approach and have set a goal, ensure that you can track and measure your progress. Most social media platforms have built-in analytics and you can also track Web traffic back to your site through Google Analytics. Be sure to tie your results back to your social media efforts where possible with careful tracking. (This could mean using tracking codes on your donation pages, Google campaign tags or landing pages created specifically for your social media outreach.) Share every little bit of progress and give your boss credit for it! It’s clear that social media is an effective channel for establishing your nonprofit’s brand identity, championing your cause and engaging with current and would-be supporters. So, how do you make sure your organization is on board — especially your boss, executive director or board members? Here are eight tips for making the case for your next social media initiative: center_img Photo Source: Big Stock Photo Adapted from Nonprofit Marketing Blog.last_img read more

LUCKY 13: Thirteen weeks to plan for the best giving season ever – starting with #GivingTuesday

first_imgCrunch time!Can it be…Labor Day weekend is really behind us? 2014 is in the home stretch and that means it is crunch time for nonprofits.In fact, 30% of the projected $300 billion in total annual donations to charities are made in December — and 10%, or $30 billion, come during the year’s last 48 hours. (Source: NY Post, December 2013)For most nonprofits, it’s make or break time. And for donors, whether they are motivated by making an impact or by the tax year, December underlines the urgency of giving.Countdown to #GivingTuesdayThe movement that has changed the December giving season since 2012 is #GivingTuesday. It started with a simple idea – to be a counterpoint to the consumerism of Black Friday and CyberMonday. From a couple hundred nonprofits in 2012, #GivingTuesday has grown into an international day of giving with organizations and donors around the globe joining the movement.Traditionally, year-end givers to nonprofits are loyal supporters or those with personal ties to an organization. Now, nonprofits can harness the energy of #GivingTuesday to engage new donors, and to extend and amplify the giving season. We know first hand. Last year we led BMoregivesMore, the campaign to make Baltimore the most generous city in America on #GivingTuesday. Nonprofits that participated in BMoreGivesMore reported that between 20% and 60% of donors on that day were new. And more than 80% who shared their results said that they had a comparable or better December overall!13 Tuesdays to go: We’re here for you.Despite all the excitement and opportunity of #GivingTuesday, your team has a full plate planning for year-end already. So how do you capitalize on #GivingTuesday?Network for Good is launching N4G Gives, a national campaign to launch the giving season on #GivingTuesday.Beginning this week, we’re offering a combination of free and client-only resources to get your team ready. We’re arming ALL nonprofits with the tools, tactics, training and motivation to make this your best December ever.And for Network for Good clients, we’ll also be offering:• Two great platforms: • DonateNow – your customized online giving page to maximize donor conversion• GiveCorps – a cutting-edge giving platform that offers donors a superior online giving experience, plus crowdfunding and peer-to-peer.• Exclusive toolkits, expert webinars, specialized coaching, and communications resources• Matching funds to make your gifts go further• Visibility with Network for Good donors What’s the first step? Start by downloading our comprehensive Giving Days eBook. According to nonprofit thought leader Beth Kanter, it’s a “terrific, free eBook with lots of tips and planning templates to help your organization decide whether to participate.”Then every Tuesday, we’ll bring you new resources to get ready for #GivingTuesday.It’s time to plan for your best December ever!Ready to get started? Our team can help you get your site ready for #GivingTuesday. Set up a time talk with a fundraising consultant today and get a free demo.last_img read more

United Nations General Assembly: A Pledge for Every Woman, Every Child

first_imgPosted on September 26, 2012Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to email this to a friend (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window)Today, the Kaiser Daily Global Health Policy Report provided a brief summary of the focus on women and children at the United Nations General Assembly. The summary highlights a number of news publications that report on the discussions about the health and well-being of women from the General Assembly.One of the featured articles, A pledge for every woman, every child, was published this morning on devex. The article describes announcements for new money to protect women and children from sexual violence as well as a new funding mechanism for maternal and child health.From the article:World Bank President Jim Yong Kim, meanwhile, announced a new special funding mechanism aimed at boosting financial support for the fourth and fifth Millennium Development Goals at the Every Woman, Every Child event.The mechanism would enable donors to scale up funding for maternal and child health. Details, however, have yet to be fleshed out.“We will be talking with our IDA shareholders and other interested donors and partners in the coming weeks to agree on the best way to do this, together,” Kim said, who also identified the bank’s work to achieve “better outcomes” for money spent on health: increasing focus on maternal health, designing innovative programs linking financing to results, and helping countries put in place strong health systems.Read the full story here.Share this: ShareEmailPrint To learn more, read:last_img read more

The Impact of Year-End Giving [Infographic]

first_imgSince it was founded in 2012, #GivingTuesday has exploded in popularity. In 2015, $116.7 million were donated in this one day. The next year, that number jumped to $168 million. 2017 is expected to be record-breaking as well.So, what can you do to make sure you get your piece of the giving day pie?Our research here at Network for Good shows that, rather than seeing #GivingTuesday as a single event, it pays to approach this day as the kick-off of a month-long year-end giving campaign. In fact, nonprofits who used #GivingTuesday to launch their year-end campaigns raised, on average, five times more overall during year-end.Not only that, but nonprofits using Donor Management raised more than those without it. It makes sense – having a donor management system lets you effectively harness your data to create better plans, quickly create targeted emails to specific subsets of donors, and easily store this information from year to year to build on your past success.If you’ve never participated before, now’s the time to start.last_img read more

Advancing an Evidence-Based Approach to Episiotomy

first_imgSouth Africa63.3% (2003) CountryEpisiotomy rate (year) Philippines63.7% (2005) India45.0% (2003) China44.9% (2002) ShareEmailPrint To learn more, read: High episiotomy rates have been reported elsewhere, such as in Oman, Tibet and in several countries in Central and South America.In settings where episiotomy rates have declined over time, socioeconomic, geographic and racial disparities persist. In the United States, for example, the national episiotomy rate decreased from 25% in 2004 to 14% in 2012. However, episiotomies are more common among white women compared to black women, among women with private insurance compared to those with Medicaid and in urban hospitals compared to rural ones. Other research has found that certain types of health care providers are more likely than others to perform episiotomy.The way forwardWhile episiotomy can be beneficial in some cases, extremely high rates in many settings across the globe indicate overuse. Additional research to estimate the ideal population-level rate may help countries and facilities adjust their practices according to a specific evidence-based target.When an episiotomy is necessary, it is crucial that the procedure be performed in a way that maximizes outcomes for the mother and infant. Some research has found variation in episiotomy technique, which may be a result of inconsistent international practice guidelines.Ensuring that women are involved in the decision-making process in the event that an episiotomy might be needed is also critical. Performing an episiotomy—or any other intervention—without a woman’s informed consent is a violation of her right to respectful maternity care. Addressing the non-evidence-based use of episiotomy is key to improving maternal health and women’s birthing experiences worldwide.Key papersSelective versus routine use of episiotomy for vaginal birthCochrane Database of Systematic Reviews | February 2017Episiotomy rates around the world: An updateBirth | August 2005Outcomes of routine episiotomy: A systematic reviewJournal of the American Medical Association | May 2005Routine vs selective episiotomy: A randomised controlled trialThe Lancet | December 1993Practice bulletin no. 165: Prevention and management of obstetric lacerations at vaginal deliveryObstetrics & Gynecology | July 2016—Check out the Maternal Health Task Force (MHTF)’s mini-series, “The Global Epidemic of Unnecessary Cesarean Sections.”Part 1 | Part 2 | Part 3Watch the webcast from “Too Much Too Soon: Addressing Over-Intervention in Maternity Care,” a discussion that took place in April 2017 as part of the Advancing Dialogue in Maternal Health Series.Subscribe to receive new MHTF blog posts in your inbox.Share this:center_img Iran79.2% (2012) Thailand91.8% (2005) Indonesia53.5% (2005) Posted on May 30, 2017May 30, 2017By: Sarah Hodin, Project Coordinator II, Women and Health Initiative, Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public HealthClick to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to email this to a friend (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window)Episiotomies—incisions made between the vagina and anus during childbirth—have long been a topic of debate among clinicians, researchers and advocates. Outdated clinical guidelines previously recommended the routine use of episiotomy to avoid natural vaginal tearing. Over the past two decades, a growing body of literature and increased advocacy efforts have led to a general consensus that episiotomy should not be conducted as a standard practice. Nevertheless, in many parts of the world, the majority of women still undergo episiotomy during childbirth.Current state of the evidenceEpisiotomy can be protective for women under certain circumstances. For example, a study based on data from several facilities in sub-Saharan Africa concluded that episiotomy was protective against anal sphincter tears and postpartum hemorrhage among women who had undergone type 3 female genital mutilation. However, used inappropriately, it can be detrimental to women’s health.A recent Cochrane systematic review examining the evidence on selective versus routine episiotomies for vaginal birth concluded:“Overall, the findings show that selective use of episiotomy in women (where a normal delivery without forceps is anticipated) means that fewer women have severe perineal trauma. Thus the rationale for conducting routine episiotomies to prevent severe perineal trauma is not justified by current evidence, and we could not identify any benefits of routine episiotomy for the baby or the mother.”Despite this recommendation, health workers sometimes encounter institutional barriers that pressure them to perform the procedure. Fear of a woman developing a third or fourth degree perineal tear and a lack of proper training can also contribute to high episiotomy rates.Global trends and disparitiesThe data on global episiotomy use are limited, especially in countries with weak health information systems. However, a paper from the 2016 Lancet Maternal Health Series reported prevalence estimates for several middle-income countries based on the most recent available data: Malaysia46.0% (2005)last_img read more

Regina committee shuns living wage mayor says city already good employer

first_imgREGINA – The City of Regina’s executive committee has voted against paying a mandatory base wage of $16.95 per hour to all civic employees and anyone contracted for work by the city.Wednesday’s vote came after a report from city administrators that recommended against bringing in a so-called living wage for hourly employees.The report says it would cost the city about $1.1 million to make the change, which would have to be covered by a property tax increase of 0.5 per cent.The living wage for Regina — as determined by the Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives in 2016 — is for a family of two working parents with two children.Currently, all of Regina’s permanent employees make more than the living wage, but 379 casual employees who work 300 hours per year or less earn below that level, although they make more than the provincial minimum wage of $11.06.Mayor Michael Fougere says the city is a good employer and is not paying its workers the bare minimum.“Every salary is above minimum wage here … our employees are well-paid,” he said.Coun. Andrew Stevens, the only executive committee member who spoke in favour of the proposed change, said he didn’t see enough in the report about the positive social and community benefits of a living wage.He pointed to six other municipalities across Canada that have adopted such a policy, with New Westminster, British Columbia being the first in 2011.“This notion that we shouldn’t be, or we can’t, or maybe this is beyond our jurisdiction … that’s patently false,” said Stevens.Peter Gilmer with the Regina Anti-Poverty Ministry argued that the proposal would help reduce the wage gap between women and men, boost spending in the local economy and create a ripple effect, inspiring other employers to follow suit.Marilyn Braun-Pollon with the Canadian Federation of Independent Business said a survey of members on the idea showed 74 per cent of small business owners oppose it.She said the majority already pay well above minimum wage, noting that there’s a misconception that a living wage will create jobs.“The best social policy is a job,” said Braun-Pollon, arguing that there’s a need for entry-level positions, mostly held by 15 to 24-year-olds.The living wage proposal will face a final vote at city council’s next meeting later this month. (CJME, CTV Regina)last_img read more