6 fascinating lessons for us from the campaign trail

first_imgI recently read a very interesting article from The New York Times about how social science and behavioral economics was used to get out the vote. The article, “Academic Dream Team Helped Obama’s Effort,” details how experts like Robert Cialdini (whom I covered just this past week), formed a consortium that provided research-based ideas on motivating people to take certain actions (especially voting). Whether you are a Democrat or a Republican or of any party, the advice the academics provided is very useful to all of us involved in the work of social change. We’re all in the business of compelling people to do things. So I wanted to pass on the most interesting tips.1. People favor candidates – and organizations! – that exhibit a combination of competence and warmth. You want to seem smart but also likable.2. When countering rumors (or myths), it’s a bad idea to repeat them. People may register a denial in the short term, but they only tend to remember the rumor or myth in the long term. Don’t deny or counter something – simply assert your competing notion.3. Use people’s sense of identity to influence behavior. In the election, volunteer canvassers said, “Mr. Jones, we know you’ve voted in the past,” to prompt future voting. We can do the same with volunteers or donors: “Mr. Jones, we know you’ve supported us in the past.” People want to stick to their past behaviors, so this can work well.4. Informal commitments help. Getting people to sign a card promising to vote increases likelihood to vote, for example. Pledging is also useful in fundraising!5. Tell people to make a plan. People are more likely to follow through on a promise if they have a plan, however simple. Ask people to specify when they’ll help you.6. Use social norms. When people were told others in their neighborhood planned to vote, it influenced them. Never forget the power of peer pressure – call out your supporters to inspire others to jump on board.For more fascinating tips on how this worked during the campaign, check out the article here.last_img read more

5 rules for thanking donors

first_imgHere at Network for Good we experienced a busy giving season right up to the final hours of 2013. This is good news for nonprofits, as we saw a 16% increase in dollars donated compared to the year-end fundraising season of 2012. After all of that activity, it can be tempting to take it easy for a few weeks now that January is here. Of course, the reality is that your work with donors is just beginning. Now is your opportunity to begin turning year-end donors into your long-term partners in good. To do so, you need a solid plan to welcome these donors, keep them informed, and build relationships with them throughout the year. The first step is to keep the magic alive with a well-planned donor gratitude strategy. Here are some things to keep in mind:Thank your donors as soon as possible. Ideally, your online donors have already received an automatic thank you and receipt, and offline donors are receiving their thank yous in the mail shortly. Thanking donors promptly is not just common courtesy, it’s positive reinforcement of their decision to support and trust your organization.A receipt is not a thank you. Yes, you must make sure your donors get donation receipts that include information on tax deductibility. That said, if the most interesting line your response to a donor’s gift is “No goods or services were received by the donor as a result of this gift,” you’re doing it wrong. (See also: IRS rules on acknowledging contributions.)One thank you is not enough. You’ve acknowledged all of your year-end donations with a proper thank you. You’re done, right? Not so fast. One great thank you is a good start, but don’t forgo regularly thanking donors to keep them up to date on the impact of their gifts. Don’t leave donors wondering, “Whatever happened to that person/animal/cause in need?”Don’t forget other donation sources. Acknowledge every donation your organization receives, whether they come from your direct mail campaign, your online donation page, or from third-party sources such as employee giving programs, peer-to-peer fundraisers, or online giving portals. Understand all of your donation sources and tailor your notes of appreciation, where necessary. New donors coming in from a peer-to-peer campaign, for example, may need a more formal introduction to your organization than donors you’ve directly solicited.Make sure your thank you is sincere and memorable. You may have a template for your donor thank yous, but if your thank you feels like a form letter, it needs more work. Express authentic gratitude for your donors’ generosity and put them in the middle of the work you do. Use photos, quotes, and even video to help bring these stories to life for your supporters. Give donors a thank you so amazing that they can’t wait to show it off to their friends and family. Need some help with your thank you letters? Here are a few resources from our learning center: How to Treat Your Donor Like Your SuperheroKey Qualities for Amazing Thank You Letters3 Things Your Donor Thank You Should Do6 Keys to Donor RetentionAre you sending an amazing thank you this year? Have you received one? Share your examples in the comments and we’ll feature the best ones in an upcoming post!last_img read more

LUCKY 13: Thirteen weeks to plan for the best giving season ever – starting with #GivingTuesday

first_imgCrunch time!Can it be…Labor Day weekend is really behind us? 2014 is in the home stretch and that means it is crunch time for nonprofits.In fact, 30% of the projected $300 billion in total annual donations to charities are made in December — and 10%, or $30 billion, come during the year’s last 48 hours. (Source: NY Post, December 2013)For most nonprofits, it’s make or break time. And for donors, whether they are motivated by making an impact or by the tax year, December underlines the urgency of giving.Countdown to #GivingTuesdayThe movement that has changed the December giving season since 2012 is #GivingTuesday. It started with a simple idea – to be a counterpoint to the consumerism of Black Friday and CyberMonday. From a couple hundred nonprofits in 2012, #GivingTuesday has grown into an international day of giving with organizations and donors around the globe joining the movement.Traditionally, year-end givers to nonprofits are loyal supporters or those with personal ties to an organization. Now, nonprofits can harness the energy of #GivingTuesday to engage new donors, and to extend and amplify the giving season. We know first hand. Last year we led BMoregivesMore, the campaign to make Baltimore the most generous city in America on #GivingTuesday. Nonprofits that participated in BMoreGivesMore reported that between 20% and 60% of donors on that day were new. And more than 80% who shared their results said that they had a comparable or better December overall!13 Tuesdays to go: We’re here for you.Despite all the excitement and opportunity of #GivingTuesday, your team has a full plate planning for year-end already. So how do you capitalize on #GivingTuesday?Network for Good is launching N4G Gives, a national campaign to launch the giving season on #GivingTuesday.Beginning this week, we’re offering a combination of free and client-only resources to get your team ready. We’re arming ALL nonprofits with the tools, tactics, training and motivation to make this your best December ever.And for Network for Good clients, we’ll also be offering:• Two great platforms: • DonateNow – your customized online giving page to maximize donor conversion• GiveCorps – a cutting-edge giving platform that offers donors a superior online giving experience, plus crowdfunding and peer-to-peer.• Exclusive toolkits, expert webinars, specialized coaching, and communications resources• Matching funds to make your gifts go further• Visibility with Network for Good donors What’s the first step? Start by downloading our comprehensive Giving Days eBook. According to nonprofit thought leader Beth Kanter, it’s a “terrific, free eBook with lots of tips and planning templates to help your organization decide whether to participate.”Then every Tuesday, we’ll bring you new resources to get ready for #GivingTuesday.It’s time to plan for your best December ever!Ready to get started? Our team can help you get your site ready for #GivingTuesday. Set up a time talk with a fundraising consultant today and get a free demo.last_img read more

Lessons from N4G’s top #GivingTuesday performers

first_imgEncouraged donors to give generously and repeatedly through the day when the “win” was in sightSent a thank you email Wednesday morning announcing the win and encouraging those that did not participate to consider giving. This outreach produced their second best day ever.Most Recurring Donors: Wildlife SOSIndia’s wildlife is under severe threat – every animal from the majestic elephant and the tiger, to the shy sloth bear and rare pangolins are being hunted. Wildlife SOS actively works towards protecting Indian wildlife, conserving habitat, studying biodiversity, conducting research, and creating alternative and sustainable livelihoods for former poacher communities.Wildlife SOS did not focus explicitly on a #GivingTuesday campaign, rather they viewed #GivingTuesday as part of their year-end fundraising. Their success in the N4G Gives campaign is a particularly powerful demonstration of the impact of #GivingTuesday. Donors are inspired be part of the movement and will seek out organizations to support – sometimes, even when they are not asked specifically.What we learned from Wildlife SOS is that the building blocks they put in place all year round pay dividends. One of those building blocks was an emphasis on recurring, or sustaining, givers.Key TacticsWildlife SOS believes in strategies focused on creating lifelong supporters. Year-round they focus on animal sponsorships for monthly donors and feel like this gives people a tangible connection to their donation. Having the building blocks in place and then capitalizing on big events means they’re not scrambling on days like #GivingTuesday and at year-end.Make this #GivingTuesday your best yet! Kick off your year-end fundraising with our tools, training and matching funds. It doesn’t matter if your organization has 2 staff members or 200, you can raise money on #GivingTuesday and we can help.Free #GivingTuesday resources are available to all nonprofits through Network for Good’s All TUEgether campaign. Network for Good customers can leverage matching funds for all donations made on December 1, 2015. Plus, customers have access to expert coaching, new donors, and exclusive resources to help plan a stellar #GivingTuesday campaign.Not a Network for Good customer yet? No problem. Sign up for a demo and find out how easy it is to raise money online. Get ready to have your best giving season ever. Created a visual “badge” for all #GivingTuesday communicationsChanged website header and homepage, and published a post about #GivingTuesdayAsked a corporate supporter to provide a match on first $20k raisedSent their first email on the Monday of Thanksgiving weekLaunched their big push on 12/1:Sent email announcing matching fundsLaunched #GivingTuesday branded donation pageAsked supporters to take #UNselfies and share #GivingTuesday has arrivedOn December 2, nonprofits and donors came together in an inspiring day of generosity. Millions of dollars were raised to fuel the good work of nonprofits all over the world.Network for Good hosted a special campaign, N4G Gives, focused on equipping nonprofits with the tools and knowledge for #GivingTuesday success. The N4G Gives campaign provided free #GivingTuesday resources to the entire nonprofit community and special training and matching funds to nonprofits using DonateNow, our online giving platform. In addition to matching funds, we also recognized the leaders in 10 fundraising categories with special awards.The most exciting validation of the value of #GivingTuesday is reflected in the experience of the “winners” of Network for Good’s N4G Gives campaign. They are large and small. Some planned for months, and some started the day before. Some have large staff teams, and some are staffed exclusively by volunteers.The common thread across all the winners was their determination to activate their passionate supporters and advocates to both give and inspire others, and to create a sense of excitement and urgency under the umbrella of #GivingTuesday.And the winner is…Most Dollars Raised: Alameda County Community Food Bank, Oakland California (ACCFB)Alameda County Community Food Bank is on a mission to end food insecurity in Alameda County, California. In 2014, the Food Bank distributed 25 million meals – more than half of the food was fresh fruits and vegetables.Their big vision can only be realized with strong donor support, and ACCFB inspired people to donate more than $100,000 (online and offline) on #GivingTuesday.Key tacticsAfter watching the progress of the #GivingTuesday movement in 2013, the team at ACCFB decided to go “all out” in 2014. They pursued a multi-channel approach including email, website, digital ads, and social. Planning started about six weeks before #GivingTuesday, but activation went into high gear during Thanksgiving week.Key elements Most Donors: Middle East Cultural and Charitable Society (Electronic Intifada)The Middle East Cultural and Charitable Society’s #GivingTuesday campaign raised funds for The Electronic Intifada, its award-winning online news publication focusing on Palestine, its people, politics, culture, and place in the world. As a nonprofit digital publication, The Electronic Intifada relies on readers and supporters to provide the funding for its investigative journalism, news, and analysis.Key TacticsMECCS used #GivingTuesday as part of its already planned year-end campaign. The campaign’s focus was to activate new donors by emphasizing the N4G Gives matching funds, and the potential to ‘win’ bonus dollars through the N4G Gives special challenges. The friendly competition inspired by the leaderboards was very motivating to their audience.Key ElementsDeployed three emails on #GivingTuesdayFirst email laid out the opportunity to receive bonus and matching fundsSecond and third emails were sent throughout the day to build excitement as they rose up the leaderboard.center_img Added a homepage popup window asking visitors to donate nowPushed social media outreachLaunched #GivingTuesday branded retargeting ads Rallied on #GivingTuesday:last_img read more

No Kitties or Puppies. HELP! (Step Two)

first_imgReview Step One In Step One of this two-part post, I shared my take on why this type of emotional candy works so well to raise money or recruit volunteers. I cited a reliable litmus test for photo impact—would you share it with your own family and friends, and would they “like” or share it? Here are some recommendations, with examples: For policy and intermediary organizations: Connect the dots between your work and the people who are the ultimate beneficiaries. If your organization is not an animal rescue or somehow directly related to puppies, kitties, or babies, these alternatives will be far more effective in helping you forge connections and motivate giving. Most important, they are authentic, relevant expressions, rather than manipulative clickbait. Organizations like yours have it even harder when building relationships and motivating action, be it giving or something else. That’s because your work is indirect. For all causes and organizations: Highlight the similarities between your audiences and your organization’s clients, participants, or beneficiaries. Get detailed and personal in words and/or photos. The close-up (bottom left) of the little girl focused on drawing is compelling! Clearly, we never want anyone to be homeless, much less our own family. The cause has the potential to scare off supporters because of their fear that it could happen to them. Stigma! However, by photographing an older resident (like your grandma or mine) reading to a couple of kids, Hope House busts through and connects us with the residents in a positive way. (I remember when my grandma read to me.) The Findlay-Hancock County Community Foundation does a great job of this on its Facebook page, as shown in the post above. Here, the foundation makes it easy to make the connection between its work and the individuals who benefit from its grants for a real “aha!” moment.center_img The details are what sticks (or doesn’t) and make your story memorable and more likely to be shared. How do you make your organization’s content compelling—beyond kitties, puppies, or babies? Please share your recommendations in the comments! You’re working on legislation related to a cause or supporting other cause organizations. This makes it challenging for prospects to connect emotionally. It takes your audience time and thought to make the connection between your impact and people, which is always a deterrent. Findlay Hope House does a great job of this on its Facebook page time and time again. Consider the post above, showing kids without homes living in Hope House’s transitional housing. But there is a great method of speeding that vital connection—make the message for your prospects and supporters. Connect the dots between your organization’s work and impact and your ultimate beneficiaries, even if there are layers in between. Okay, your organization is one of many that can’t use kitty or puppy photos to raise money or recruit volunteers. So what can you do to quickly and effectively connect with the emotions of prospects and supporters? Step 2: Make emotional connections and compelling content—if not candy—even without the supercute. Review Step One With refreshing practicality, Nancy Schwartz rolls up her sleeves to help nonprofits develop and implement strategies to build strong relationships that inspire key supporters to action. She shares her deep nonprofit marketing insights—and passion—through consulting, speaking, and her popular blog and e-news at GettingAttention.org.last_img read more

A New Look for Network for Good

first_imgThis is a blog post I’ve been looking forward to writing for some time now.Today I’m pleased to share the launch of our redesigned Network for Good website featuring a fresh new look that highlights our best resources and pulls them into one central location. You can now visit www.networkforgood.com to access (and search) all of our content, including our webinars, guides and templates, The Nonprofit Marketing Blog, and Fundraising 123 articles. You can also find updated information on Network for Good’s fundraising products and services and learn how to improve your strategy for connecting with individual donors.A big thanks to the amazing team here at Network for Good, who imagined, designed, built, and launched the site in record time. Our appreciation also goes out to our many advisors and testers (including our customers, partners, readers, and sector experts) who helped us refine our approach over the last several weeks.We’re excited about our new site, and we hope you find it easier to navigate and more useful than ever. I’d love to hear what you think—drop me a line and let me know your questions and feedback.last_img read more

How to Use Your Data to Get Closer to Supporters & Prospects

first_imgReach Broader to Fine-Tune Messages, Channels, and TimingDon’t stop with your donor database. Your organization will find equally valuable insights in sources as like your email system, volunteer database, Facebook and Twitter analytics, and online survey findings.These sources provide priceless clues about donor habits. The most reliable way to reach your donors or prospects will always be:Where they already are (For example, in their email inboxes or Facebook accounts).At the times and on the days they tend to be there (when they open or click emails, sign your online petition, or retweet a recent tweet from your organization).You can also use these sources to sharpen your insights into your donors’ passions and values, so you can ensure your campaigns reach and resonate with them. For example, use your volunteer data to find out: How many current or recent donors were volunteers first (and whether they still are or not)? If there’s a significant percentage of donors who entered the organization as volunteers:Consider launching a donor recruitment campaign to current volunteers that features profiles of existing donors who are or were volunteers.If you need to build your volunteer corps, cross-promote those opportunities to similar donors who are not current volunteers.When it comes to data, there’s SO much power in the information that’s already at your fingertips. I can’t wait to hear what you do with it! As a fundraiser, one of the toughest parts of your job is finding (and keeping) loyal donors. This is an especially difficult task in the face of uncertain economic times. Mix in our crazy presidential election ramp up, and you’re left with a foolproof recipe for widespread anxiety and skepticism.I know that these barriers are hard to transcend, but there is a way to build deep and lasting connections with your targeted donors and prospects. And that way is paved with data that you already have. Let me tell you what I mean.Use Giving to Date to Shape Your Future Approach The easiest place to start is with what you already know. Dig into your donor database and focus on donors from the last two years, especially those who are high-ticket givers or have given three or more years in a row.  Retaining these folks is your absolute priority!Don’t have a donor database that can get the job done? Learn more about Network for Good’s newest product for small to mid-sized nonprofits: a donor management system that has everything you need and nothing you don’t. Learn more.Next, look for trends or patterns to help you deliver the strongest possible ask to each donor (or, more realistically, to small groups of donors). Here are two questions you can answer with data you’re likely to have on hand:What do your monthly donors look like? Get a clear picture of your monthly donors, especially those who are newly committed to monthly giving. These folks are loyal and most likely to become long-term supporters.See if other prospects share some of the same characteristics, and then launch a campaign to convert them into monthly donors. Who’s made a significantly larger gift than ever before within the last six months?Make a personal thank you calls (a personal note otherwise), and ask what spurred the latest gift. There may be more donors about to experience the same situation and likely to respond to a focused ask. Plus, these folks may be ripe for major gift prospecting.last_img read more

United Nations General Assembly: A Pledge for Every Woman, Every Child

first_imgPosted on September 26, 2012Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to email this to a friend (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window)Today, the Kaiser Daily Global Health Policy Report provided a brief summary of the focus on women and children at the United Nations General Assembly. The summary highlights a number of news publications that report on the discussions about the health and well-being of women from the General Assembly.One of the featured articles, A pledge for every woman, every child, was published this morning on devex. The article describes announcements for new money to protect women and children from sexual violence as well as a new funding mechanism for maternal and child health.From the article:World Bank President Jim Yong Kim, meanwhile, announced a new special funding mechanism aimed at boosting financial support for the fourth and fifth Millennium Development Goals at the Every Woman, Every Child event.The mechanism would enable donors to scale up funding for maternal and child health. Details, however, have yet to be fleshed out.“We will be talking with our IDA shareholders and other interested donors and partners in the coming weeks to agree on the best way to do this, together,” Kim said, who also identified the bank’s work to achieve “better outcomes” for money spent on health: increasing focus on maternal health, designing innovative programs linking financing to results, and helping countries put in place strong health systems.Read the full story here.Share this: ShareEmailPrint To learn more, read:last_img read more

Yes We Can, and This is Why We Do It Every Day

first_imgThese written words can do no justice to the presence, dignity and inspiration of this gentle man, a hero who, as a colleague and friend remarked, through his life has saved countless lives.  Another colleague, who sat on my other side during the ceremony, said never in his life had he witnessed such a moving and motivating closing statement.  Throughout the speech you could not hear a pin drop.  Everyone was riveted.  At the end of his speech, he received a long and well deserved standing ovation.  Most of us admitted to having tears in our eyes, hard not to because most of us seemed not to have a tissue!  After the formal closing by the Minister of Health of Zanzibar, many of the participants, especially the younger ones (the “new blood”) rushed to where Dr. Mahmoud Fathalla was to congratulate him, to shake his hand, and to have their photograph taken with him.  We all agreed that this was a reminder of why we get up every day to do the work we do.Learn more about the conference and access the conference presentations at www.gmhc2013.com. Join the conference conversation on Twitter: #GMHC2013Share this: ShareEmailPrint To learn more, read: We thank and we appreciate.We regret and we apologize.We promise, and yes, we can. We thank and we appreciate.We regret and we apologize.We promise, and yes, we can.center_img Posted on January 24, 2013June 12, 2017By: Karen Beattie, Director of Fistula Care and Associate Vice President of EngenderHealthClick to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to email this to a friend (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window)This post is cross-posted from the EngenderHealth website.Reflections from a lifelong global women’s health advocate on the closing ceremony of the Global Maternal Health ConferenceIt was the end of three days of meetings, and I seriously considered skipping out on the closing plenary session.  But – I knew Dr. Mahmoud Fathalla would be speaking and I have learned that one should never miss an opportunity to hear his thoughts.  For those uninitiated, Dr. Fathalla is a professor at Assiut University in Egypt, a former head of the reproductive health division at WHO, and the father of the Safe Motherhood initiative.  He was also a member of EngenderHealth’s Board of Directors for a long period of time.The Global Maternal Health Conference took place at the Arusha International Conference Center in Arusha, Northern Tanzania.  The Center was for many years the home of the international tribunal that judged the actions of those involved in the genocide in Rwanda in 1994.  Arusha is also close to the Rift Valley and Olduvai Gorge, for the longest time considered the cradle of humankind, although a spot in South Africa now holds the “cradle of humankind” title.  At Laetoli, nearby to Olduvai Gorge, footprints of an early human ancestor were preserved in volcanic ash dating from 3.6 million years ago and were discovered in the 1970s.  That brings me to Dr. Fathalla’s speech, entitled “A Message to the Lady of Laetoli.”  Dr. Fathalla noted that one of the sets of footprints was deemed to be that of a lady, and because of the way the print was indented into the ash, it was widely held that she was carrying an infant on her left hip.  He also noted that this individual or one of her sisters was our collective “mitochondrial mother.”Dr. Fathalla’s message to the Lady of Laetoli: We thank and we appreciate because we know the sacrifices and risks of women through the ages are the reasons we are here today.  We know that maternal mortality was extremely high until recently.  Where nothing is done to avert maternal mortality, “natural” mortality is around 1,000 to 1,500 per 100,000 live births.  Dr. Fathalla cited a PRB 2011 paper that estimated the number of humans ever born was 107 billion and the population in mid-2011 was just under 7 billion.   A stunning fact Dr. Fathalla gave is that more women have given up their lives in childbirth, for the survival of our species, than men have ever died in battle.  So our very existence is the gift and sacrifice of women.We regret and we apologize and we cannot expect forgiveness.  Women had to give up their lives when we did not have the means to prevent their deaths in pregnancy and childbirth.  And yet, when we do have the means, we still leave them to die.  We should plead guilty when we see that 800 women still die every day.  An inconvenient truth is that they die because societies have yet to make the decision that their lives can be saved.We promise we will eradicate maternal mortality, and yes, we can, for several reasons:The work presented by participants at the GMHC Conference 2013 is evidence of the immense body of knowledge and commitment shared across disciplines and throughout all areas of the world.  Dr. Fathalla was gratified and comforted by the “new blood” to carry on this work.  He showed a picture of Malala, the young girl recently shot down for wanting an education and advocating for education on behalf of her peers.  He was gratified that she is recovering and moved by the statements of her classmates that they would not be stopped from getting an education – and “they will win.”He noted the progress the world has made.  Between 1990 and 2010, maternal deaths had dropped by 50%, but there still remains work to be done.The message from the representatives of the host country, Tanzania, that maternal health is a national priority and that it had experienced a 25% drop in maternal mortality between 2005 and 2010.The power of women, making their voices heard.He repeated his message to the Lady of Laetoli:last_img read more

Resource Tool: Human Resources for Health

first_imgPosted on July 17, 2014November 2, 2016By: Katie Millar, Technical Writer, Women and Health Initiative, Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public HealthClick to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to email this to a friend (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window)This post is part of our “Supporting the Human in Human Resources” blog series co-hosted by the Maternal Health Task Force and Jacaranda Health.To enrich the “Supporting the Human in Human Resources” blog series, a round-up of recent literature on the subject is here aggregated as a useful tool for public health practitioners. Let us know how these articles are helpful and about other human resource topics that interest you.Landmark articles:Systematic Review on Human Resources for Health Interventions to Improve Maternal Health Outcomes: Evidence from Developing CountriesHUMAN RESOURCES FOR HEALTH: foundation for Universal Health Coverage and the post-2015 development agendaHuman resources for maternal, newborn and child health: from measurement and planning to performance for improved health outcomesHuman resources for maternal health: multi-purpose or specialists?Recent Publications:Time to address gender discrimination and inequality in the health workforceFactors affecting motivation and retention of primary health care workers in three disparate regions in KenyaTask-shifting and prioritization: a situational analysis examining the role and experiences of community health workers in MalawiHRM and its effect on employee, organizational and financial outcomes in health care organizationsHope and despair: community health assistants’ experiences of working in a rural district in ZambiaReaching Mothers and Babies with Early Postnatal Home Visits: The Implementation Realities of Achieving High Coverage in Large-Scale ProgramsCommunity Health Workers in Low-, Middle-, and High-Income Countries: An Overview of Their History, Recent Evolution, and Current EffectivenessHome visits by community health workers to prevent neonatal deaths in developing countries: a systematic reviewExpansion in the private sector provision of institutional delivery services and horizontal equity: evidence from Nepal and BangladeshPerformance-based incentives to improve health status of mothers and newborns: what does the evidence show?Building capacity to develop an African teaching platform on health workforce development: a collaborative initiative of universities from four sub Saharan countriesRetention of female volunteer community health workers in Dhaka urban slums: a prospective cohort studyShare this: ShareEmailPrint To learn more, read:last_img read more

Research Gaps in Perinatal Mental Health: U.S. Racial & Ethnic Disparities and Neglected Global Populations

first_img ShareEmailPrint To learn more, read: Posted on August 19, 2016September 26, 2016By: Sarah Hodin, Project Coordinator II, Women and Health Initiative, Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public HealthClick to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to email this to a friend (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window)Racial & ethnic disparities in the United StatesRacial and ethnic disparities in health status, health care access and quality of care have been well-documented in the United States. Black women are about three times more likely than white women to die from pregnancy-related causes even after accounting for socioeconomic status and educational attainment. The preterm delivery and infant mortality rates for black mothers are also much higher than for white mothers. Racial health inequalities are not only unjust but costly, accounting for approximately $230 billion in direct medical expenditures. Nevertheless, the research on racial and ethnic disparities in perinatal mental health (and mental health in general) is lacking, and the majority of research in this area focuses on postpartum depression.Postpartum depression (PPD), which is defined as “intense feelings of sadness, anxiety, or despair that prevent [new mothers] from being able to do their daily tasks,” is one of the most common childbirth-related complications, affecting about one in seven pregnant women in the United States; however, many women are not diagnosed and even fewer are appropriately treated. Depression or anxiety before or during pregnancy, recent stressful life events and poor social support are strong risk factors for PPD, and some research has also found low subjective socioeconomic status to be a predictor.The evidence is inconclusive on whether women of certain races or ethnicities are at a higher risk of developing perinatal mental health issues, but some research has shown racial disparities in treatment. One study found that black and Latina women were less likely than white women to initiate mental health care after delivery for PPD, and among those who did seek care, black and Latina women tended to initiate treatment later and were significantly less likely to receive follow-up care. There are a number of potential explanations for this disparity, including health system barriers such as challenges receiving referrals for mental health services and sociocultural factors such as fear of stigma for seeking treatment for PPD. The quality of care a woman receives when she is screened or initially treated for perinatal mental disorders may also affect the likelihood that she continues to seek care.In order to address racial and ethnic disparities in the diagnosis and treatment of perinatal mental health, we need to identify women at risk of developing not just PPD but other perinatal mental health issues.Neglected populations in low- and middle-income countriesPerinatal mental health issues are common in non-U.S. global settings as well. A systematic review of evidence from low- and middle-income countries (LMICs) found an average prevalence of 16% and 20% of perinatal mental illness among pregnant and postnatal women respectively. Risk factors included socioeconomic disadvantage, unintended pregnancy, being young and/or unmarried and lacking support from intimate partners and family. Women who belonged to an ethnic majority and who had higher educational attainment, a steady job and a supportive intimate partner were less likely to develop these conditions. Another systematic review found that one in three migrant women from LMICs suffered from perinatal mental health issues. However, these results are based on research from a subset of countries; most LMICs around the world are not represented in global estimations of prevalence, which limits the ability to measure the scope of the problem and associated risk factors.Given the high prevalence of perinatal mental health issues in the U.S. and around the world, additional research focused on inequalities and neglected populations is warranted. Evidence suggests that certain women are at a disproportionately high risk of suffering from perinatal mental disorders, but the current body of research is insufficient for accurately identifying the most vulnerable women. Sound measurement and research is a necessary first step for identifying high-risk populations and designing evidence-based interventions to address inequalities in perinatal mental health.—Read the MHTF blog series on maternal mental health.Read the MHTF blog series on inequities in maternal mortality in the U.S.Learn more about racial and ethnic disparities in U.S. health care from The Commonwealth Fund, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation.Check out the perinatal mental health series in The Lancet.Share this:last_img read more

The Current State of Maternal Health in Nepal

first_img ShareEmailPrint To learn more, read: Posted on December 29, 2017January 2, 2018By: Amrit Banstola, Public Health Practitioner, NepalClick to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to email this to a friend (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window)In November 2017, the most recent Nepal Demographic and Health Survey (NDHS) was published with national data from 2016. The 2016 NDHS is one of the most comprehensive demographic and public health reports released by the Nepalese Ministry of Health in the last five years. Below are some highlighted findings from the report that illustrate the current state of maternal health in Nepal, progress made so far and gaps to address moving forward.Maternal mortalityThe maternal mortality ratio (MMR) in Nepal decreased from 539 maternal deaths per 100,000 live births to 239 maternal deaths per 100,000 live births between 1996 and 2016. In 2016, roughly 12% of deaths among women of reproductive age were classified as maternal deaths.Antenatal careIn 2016, 84% of pregnant women had at least one antenatal care (ANC) contact with a skilled provider—defined as either a doctor, nurse or midwife/auxiliary nurse midwife—which was a 25% increase from 2011. The percentage of women who had four or more ANC visits increased steadily from 50% in 2011 to 69% in 2016.Although the report showed increases in skilled ANC utilization, only 49% of women received counselling on five critical components during ANC: use of a skilled birth attendant (SBA), facility-based delivery, information about danger signs during pregnancy, where to go in case of danger signs and the benefits of postnatal care. Utilization of ANC services was a significant predictor of place of delivery and SBA-assisted births.Women in the highest wealth quintile with a high education level and those residing in urban areas were much more likely to have four or more ANC contacts from a skilled provider compared to women of lower socioeconomic status and education and those living in rural areas.Place of delivery and skilled birth attendanceAmong the notable findings in this year’s report was the rise in facility-based delivery and the use of SBAs. Between 2011 and 2016, there was a 22% increase in both the proportion of institutional deliveries (from 35% to 57%) and births assisted by SBAs (from 36% to 58%). Doctors assisted 31% of total deliveries, and nurses and midwives/auxiliary nurse midwives assisted 27%. While the percentage of deliveries attended by traditional birth attendants decreased from 11% in 2011 to 5% in 2016, the home birth rate remained high at 41%. Many women in Nepal still deliver with no one present or with an untrained friend or relative.There were large socioeconomic disparities in this area as well. While 90% of women in the highest wealth quintile delivered in a health facility, the same was true for only 34% of women in the lowest quintile. 89% of the wealthiest women delivered with an SBA, but only 34% of the poorest women did so. Similarly, the percentage of births attended by SBAs was 85% among women who had secondary or higher education and 38% among women without a formal education. Rates of facility-based delivery and the use of SBAs also varied among different provinces.Postnatal careThe percentage of women who received a postnatal care (PNC) assessment within two days following delivery rose from 45% in 2011 to 57% in 2016. 81% of women who delivered in a health facility and 13% of women who delivered elsewhere received PNC within two days of delivery. However, there were significant socioeconomic disparities in PNC utilization: 81% of women in the highest wealth quintile had an early PNC visit compared to only 37% among women in the lowest wealth quintile.The way forwardOverall, Nepal has made substantial progress in improving maternal health care access and utilization. However, disparities remain according to women’s socioeconomic status, education level and place of residence. Additionally, efforts are needed to improve the quality of maternal health care to end preventable maternal deaths.Nepal has committed to doing its part to achieve Sustainable Development Goal (SDG) target 3.1 of reducing the global MMR to less than 70 maternal deaths per 100,000 live births by 2030. To achieve this ambitious target, Nepal will need to reduce its MMR by at least 7.5% annually addressing severe inequities in maternal health access, utilization and quality.—Learn more about maternal mortality under the SDGs.Explore data on maternal and newborn health care coverage in countries across the globe on the Countdown to 2030 website.Are you interested in writing for the Maternal Health Task Force blog? Check out our guest post guidelines.Share this:last_img read more

New Jobs and Internships in Maternal, Newborn and Child Health

first_imgShare this: ShareEmailPrint To learn more, read: Posted on August 30, 2019Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to email this to a friend (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window)Interested in a position in reproductive, maternal, newborn, child or adolescent health? Every month, the Maternal Health Task Force rounds up job and internship postings from around the globe.AfricaReproductive Health Program Management Advisor: PSI; Niamey, NigerSenior Advisor, Community Engagement: Save the Children; Bamako, MaliSenior Social and Behavior Change Advisor: Save the Children; Bamako, MaliM&E Director, Continuum of Care, Technical Assistance: PATH; Lusaka, Zambia (must have legal authorization to work in Zambia)Advocacy and Policy Manager, Advocacy and Public Policy: PATH; Kampala, Uganda (must have legal authorization to work in Uganda)Reproductive & Maternal Health Project Associate: Partners in Health; Kono, Sierra LeoneAsiaTechnical Director: Jhpiego; Afghanistan (Afghan nationals are strongly encouraged to apply)Program Director, Reproductive, Maternal, Newborn, Child and Adolescent Health: PATH; New Delhi, IndiaNorth AmericaCommunications and Influence Manager: Jacaranda Health; Durham, NCSPO, Child Survival and Surveillance: Gates Foundation; Seattle, WADivision Chief, Maternal, Child, and Family Health: State of Illinois; Cook County, ILSenior Program Specialist Maternal and Child Health: International Development Research Center; Ottawa, ON, CanadaResearch Assistant II, Delivery Decisions: Ariadne Labs; Boston, MANational Director, Research, Evaluation & Data: Planned Parenthood; New York, NYSenior Data Analyst: Planned Parenthood; US RemoteTORCH Reproductive Health Educator: National Institute for Reproductive Health; New York, NYOnline Communications Assistant, Media and Communications Branch, Division of Communications and Strategic Partnerships (DCS): UNFPA; New York, NY (Closing date: 26 September 2019 – 5:00pm EST)Maternal and Newborn Health Lead, MOMENTUM: Save the Children; Washington DCFamily Planning/Reproductive Health Lead, MOMENTUM: Save the Children; Washington DCSRHR Resource Mobilization Intern – US Government: CARE; Atlanta, GATechnical Lead, Immunizations, Maternal, Newborn, Child Health and Nutrition: PATH; Washington DC—Is your organization hiring? Please contact us if you have maternal health job or internship opportunities that you would like included in our next job roundup.last_img read more

Russian Japanese foreign ministers discuss disputed islands

first_imgMOSCOW — The foreign Ministers of Russia and Japan are holding talks about disputed Pacific islands.The Soviet Union took the four southernmost Kuril Islands during the final days of World War II. Japan asserts territorial rights to the islands, which it calls the Northern Territories, and the dispute has kept both countries from signing a peace treaty.Russian President Vladimir Putin and Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe have agreed to resume discussions on a 1956 Soviet proposal to return two of the islands to Japan. Russian Foreign Minister Sergey Lavrov and Japanese counterpart Taro Kono met Monday to pave way for Abe’s visit to Moscow later this month.Signalling tough talks ahead, Moscow has recently bristled at Japanese statements about a possible deal, warning Tokyo against “artificially inciting the atmosphere.”The Associated Presslast_img read more

FSJ Hospital Foundation turns 25 years old

first_imgFORT ST. JOHN, B.C. – The Fort St. John Hospital Foundation recently turned 25 years old.Since 1994, the Foundation has been dedicated to working with the community to enhance patient care and comfort in the community.Over the years the Foundation has partnered with the community to purchase all kinds of equipment and complete many initiatives to improve patient experience at the Fort St. John Hospital and Peace Villa Care Facility. In 2009, the Hospital Foundation helped raise funds for the Hospital’s CT Scanner and in 2017 for the Hospital’s new MRI.Niki Hedges, the new Executive Director of the Hospital Foundation, says these two machines play an important role at the hospital for patient care.“Two of the foundation’s biggest projects to date are the purchase of a CT Scanner in 2009 and the installation of an MRI in 2017. These amazing tools have spared many members of our community the time and expense of travel and many residents of neighbouring communities the stress of extended travel for testing.”According to Hospital statistics, The CT Scanner has scanned over 5,000 patients this year alone, with the MRI scanning over 3000 patients to date.The Fort St. John hospital foundation will be hosting a 25 Anniversary Celebration on February 21, 2019. For more information, you can contact the FSJ Hospital Foundation at 250-261-7564.last_img read more

GoFundMe Support Fund for Matt Jr Beckerton

first_img‘We are uncertain of the extensive damages as for more tests will be carried out.  He has a very long road ahead of him as well as his family.  His Dad Matt is by side and his Mom Ashley is back home caring for his 3 older brothers.’The GoFundMe account goes on to share the money is to help support the family in their time of need, and the long journey they have ahead.The account set up on March, 14th, 2019 is at $8,345 out of its $10,000 goalTo view the GoFundMe account; CLICK HERE FORT ST. JOHN, B.C. – Young, Matt Jr Beckerton had an incident with accidentally ingesting a chemical solution that has sent him to Children’s Hospital in serious condition.In speaking with Matt Beckerton, he shared “Our family is very happy with our community spirit, all their kind words and support means more than the world to us right now.”According to the GoFundMe account;last_img read more

Tata Tele in ATC talks to sell tower biz stake for Rs

first_imgNew Delhi: Tata Teleservices is in talks with American Tower Corporation to sell its entire stake in the mobile tower business for about Rs 2,500 crore at a price of Rs 212 per share. “Tata Teleservices sold half of its stake to American Tower Corporation (ATC) in October 2018. It is option to sell the rest of the stake it holds along with Tata Sons in this fiscal. The process for sale has started for valuation of around Rs 2,500 crore at Rs 212 per share,” a source, who did not wish to be identified, told PTI. Also Read – Thermal coal import may surpass 200 MT this fiscalNo immediate reply was received from ATC and Tata Teleservices on an e-mail query sent to them in this regard. Tata Teleservices sold half of its 26 per cent stake and IDFC its entire stake in mobile tower company ATC TIPL to majority shareholder American Tower Corporation (ATC) for Rs 2,940 crore. In October 2015, ATC bought a 51 per cent stake in Viom from Tata Teleservices Ltd and SREI Infrastructure Finance for Rs 7,635 crore. After acquiring majority stake, ATC named the firm as ATC Telecom Infrastructure Pvt Ltd. Also Read – Food grain output seen at 140.57 mt in current fiscal on monsoon boostATC TIPL is the second-largest private telecom tower firm in India with a portfolio of around 78,000 mobile towers. Tata Teleservices’ stake in Viom Networks came down to 26 per cent after ATC acquired a majority stake in the company and merged its existing India business and further reduced to 13 per cent after stake sale in October 2018. ATC’s stake in ATC TIPL is likely to reach around 90 per cent if the Tata Teleservices exits the business after selling entire stake.last_img read more

3 cops 2 land mafia members booked for conspiring against property dealer

first_imgGhaziabad: Ghaziabad police have booked five persons including a chowki in-charge under Loni border police station, one head constable, a constable and two land mafiyas for allegedly plotting a conspiracy by registering fake rape case against a property dealer pressurising him to settle down a land dispute. Cops said that the victim alleged police officials to work in collaboration with the land mafiyas.According to police, the accused were identified as sub-inspector Ashutosh Tarar, head constable Vijay Kumar, constable Javed and two land mafiyas Rakesh Khurana and Parvinder. A senior police officer said that Ashutosh is a chowki in-charge of Inderpuri police post under Loni border police station jurisdiction. Also Read – Odd-Even: CM seeks transport dept’s views on exemption to women, two wheelers, CNG vehiclesAs per reports, property dealer Nawab Ali Saifi, a resident of Lakshmi Garden colony in Loni border area of Ghaziabad filed a complaint of getting harassed by police after they filed a fake rape case against him. “Rakesh Khurana and Parvinder are two land mafiyas who have acquired a number of government owned as well as private properties. A complaint regarding such illegal activities was made by me against both the accused which are already under investigation by the commissioner Meerut zone. The accused persons, in order to take revenge, joined a few police officials when them to plot a conspiracy against me,” said Nawab. Also Read – More good air days in Delhi due to Centre’s steps: JavadekarHe further said that the accused persons pulled a woman into their plan whom they sent to his house to lure him but they failed. “On the morning of 23 March 2019, the accused persons sent a woman to my house who posed as a plot buyer but we just had a few minutes conversation regarding the property and I asked her to come some other day as I was busy in a family function. Later in evening, the chowki in-charge called me and threatened that the woman has filed a rape case against me. When I reached police station, the woman denied of her allegations in front of police but the police officials kept on threatening me and filed a fake rape case against me on April 5. Since then the police officials are demanding money to settle the matter and threatening me and my family with death consequences if I do not settle the matter,” alleged Nawab. “Based on complaint received, an FIR has been registered against five persons under the IPC sections of 384 (Punishment for extortion), 504 (Intentional insult with intent to provoke breach of the peace), 506 (punishment for criminal intimidation) and section 7 and 15 under the Prevention of Corruption Act, 1988. We are also investigating the role of woman who was also roped in the plan by accused persons,” said Upendra Kumar Agarwal, Senior Superintendent of Police (SSP), Ghaziabad.last_img read more

Football JT Barretts record watch – By the Numbers

Ohio State redshirt senior quarterback J.T. Barrett (16) throws a pass in the second quarter of the 2017 Ohio State- UNLV game on Sep. 23. Ohio State won 54- 21. Credit: Jack Westerheide | Photo EditorLost among the quarterback controversy at Ohio State has been the extended success of quarterback J.T. Barrett. The fifth-year senior has posted up statistics that rank him among the program’s greatest in history. Here is a look at records he has broken and records he still has yet to set.22 – Ohio State records Barrett currently holds. As he prepares for the fifth game in his final season under center for Ohio State, Barrett holds 22 school records for either single-game, season or career statistics, with a chance to add some more to his resume before the end of the season. Touchdown passes? Barrett with 79 (second is Bobby Hoying with 57). Two-hundred-yard passing games? Barrett with 21, five more than Hoying. Average total offense per game? Barrett at 285 yards (Terrelle Pryor is second at 185.2). And just two weeks ago against Army, Barrett surpassed future NFL Hall-of-Famer and former Purdue quarterback Drew Brees for career touchdowns responsible for among Big Ten quarterbacks with his 107th touchdown. He has since moved to 30th on the all-time list with 112 touchdowns, and trails only Oklahoma quarterback Baker Mayfield (117) among active quarterbacks.Ohio State redshirt senior quarterback J.T. Barrett (16) runs the ball in the first quarter of the 2017 OSU- Army game on Sep. 16. OSU won 38-7. Credit: Jack Westerheide | Photo Editor22 (again) – passing touchdowns until Barrett holds the Big Ten record. Brees’ record for most career passing touchdowns could be within Barrett’s reach this season. In his four seasons at Purdue, Brees completed 90 touchdown passes. With just 22 fewer than Brees, Barrett could set the record if he averages even just three touchdown passes per game over the remaining eight games in the schedule, plus any more he throws during postseason bowl games.Barrett already leads Ohio State quarterbacks by miles in this area, having thrown 79 over his career, 22 more than Pryor.201 – passing yards left until Barrett owns the program record. Heading into Saturday’s game against Rutgers, Barrett sits just 201 passing yards away from surpassing Art Schlichter for the most career passing yards at 7,547. He is also just three rushing touchdowns shy of passing Schlichter for the most by an Ohio State quarterback, with the record currently set at 35.In terms of the Big Ten quarterback records for passing yards, Barrett still has a ways to go and is unlikely to break that record. With 7,347 career passing yards, Barrett would need 4,445 this season to surpass Drew Brees’ record. The Buckeyes’ three-time captain has yet to post a season with more than 3,000 passing yards.588* – rushing yards left until Barrett holds the record for most rush yards by an Ohio State quarterback. As a dual-threat quarterback, Barrett has provided the Buckeyes with offense not just with his arm, but also with his legs. Over his career, Barrett has piled up 2,639 rushing yards on 534 total attempts. The only quarterback still ahead of Barrett in terms of rushing yards is Braxton Miller, who totalled 3,053 rushing yards in his time spent as a quarterback.The asterisk by this statistic is just to indicate that Miller rushed for 261 yards his final season in Columbus as an H-back and were not accounted into his total of 3053.Ohio State redshirt senior J.T. Barrett (16) runs the ball in the second quarter of the 2017 Ohio State- UNLV game on Sep. 23. Ohio State won 54- 21. Credit: Jack Westerheide | Photo Editor1.3 – passing efficiency shy of setting Ohio State and Big Ten record. Rate statistics and other non-counting numbers are much more challenging to predict than counting stats. Barrett currently owns a career passing efficiency of 149.8, trailing both the Big Ten and Ohio State record holder Joe Germaine, who sits at 151.0 (minimum of 700 attempts).Over his career, Barrett has only once posted a passer rating of more than 151, and it came in his first season of play. So far this season, he has a rating of 156.8 and has exceeded that 151 mark in all but one of the four games he’s played in so far. It has been an incredibly high passing efficiency mark this season and maintaining this rate could be challenging. But if the three-time captain is able to maintain this rate all season long, he should be able to exceed Germaine.3 – 300-yard passing games shy of setting the Ohio State record. Following up on another record held by Germaine, Barrett has a total of six games in which he has passed for more than 300 yards. Four of Barrett’s 300-plus passing yard games came in his redshirt freshman season. The only other two 300-yard games have come in the season opener last season against Bowling Green and then again in the opener this season against Indiana.For a team that has relied heavily on its running game over the past several seasons, Ohio State might not give Barrett the chance to reach that milestone. Though Barrett has half of his 300-plus yard games against conference opponents, two of those three came in his redshirt freshman season when he was far more invested in the passing game. Three more games is hardly a lofty total to reach, but recent history suggests it could be a challenge for Barrett to set the record. read more

Sharpshooter Mariano is impressing Lopetegui

first_imgDuring the training sessions that Julen Lopetegui is conducting at Real Madrid on the international break, it appears that Mariano is banging them all in.Mariano Diaz, the player who became a laughing stock at Real Madrid for getting signed by Los Blancos and getting Ronaldo’s number ‘7’ is impressing Julen Lopetegui. The international break is well underway this week and the next one, the Spanish coach is having more personalized training sessions with many of the players who didn’t go with their national teams for the next few days. The boss has both of his top strikers under his command alongside young Brazilian talent Vinicius, but the one who is taking all the spotlight is Dominican forward Mariano Diaz. The club has published videos of the player getting into mini competitions with French striker Karim Benzema, who is a changed man after Cristiano Ronaldo’s exit and is finally showing everyone that he truly is one of the greats on Spanish football. But turns out that Benzema has some very stiff competition with Mariano, as Julen Lopetegui is quite pleasantly surprised with the player’s goal-scoring abilities during the practice sessions from the last few days.¡Acción brillante!? @MarceloM12➡ @Benzema? @Lucasvazquez91? @marianodiaz7#RMCity | #HalaMadrid pic.twitter.com/WKhJFQ644X— Real Madrid C.F. (@realmadrid) September 6, 2018Lopetegui has been watching all his new arrivals closely, but Mariano is arguably the one who he pays more attention to because there is a general feeling inside the club of this striker having the talent to wear the number ‘7’ jersey at the club. Lopetegui has been talking to the staff inside the club about Mariano as if he was the club’s most impressive signing during the summer, he is even telling everyone that he can become a more prominent player for the club as soon as the international break is over a week from now. The player’s teammates are also very surprised with his development at Olympique Lyonnais, because they feel like his Ligue 1 experience has helped him mature and brought him to transform into a top-quality striker who is set to bring a lot of great nights to the Santiago Bernabeu during the present season. In fact, just this week there was a series of matches with the academy players, in which Mariano took all the spotlight by scoring many impressive goals that Lopetegui thoroughly enjoyed during the session.⚽ GOLES ‘made in’ @lafabricacrm durante el entrenamiento de hoy… ? @marcosllorente? @Lucasvazquez91? @sergio_regui ? @marianodiaz7 #RMCity | #HalaMadrid pic.twitter.com/v37jg9tQlD— Real Madrid C.F. (@realmadrid) September 5, 2018Sergio Ramos, Real MadridZidane reveals Sergio Ramos injury concern for Real Madrid Andrew Smyth – September 14, 2019 Zinedine Zidane has put Sergio Ramos’ availability for Real Madrid’s trip to Sevilla next weekend in doubt after withdrawing him against Levante.The plan for Mariano’s debut.As the upcoming five matches for Real Madrid after the break will be the most difficult of this start of the season, Julen Lopetegui already has a plan for Mariano to make his debut as soon as possible and he has already chosen San Mames Stadium against Athletic Club to give the player the chance he’s been waiting for. The Spanish giants have to visit the Bilbao club on the weekend after the international break, but then they have four more matches that can be considered as highly competitive and that will need all the available players for Lopetegui at the top of their game. Giving Mariano this chance to start having activity with the club, is the best way for the manager to have a top striker ready for the next four matches after that. Also, Lopetegui is planning on giving some rest to many of his international players on the next match in order to avoid possible injuries. This is how Mariano might come in to replace other usual starting eleven players such as Gareth Bale or Marco Asensio.? #RMCity? @Benzema ⚽ @marianodiaz7 ? @vini11Oficial ? @marcosllorente pic.twitter.com/GsKbkGFOIK— Real Madrid C.F. (@realmadrid) September 6, 2018The calendar for Real Madrid in the next month will be truly challenging, because they have to travel to Bilbao on the weekend after the break and then come back for the Champions League debut against AS Roma just a few days after. Then Los Blancos will face Espanyol at the Santiago Bernabeu Stadium to complete a total of three matches within seven days during the second half of September, but the next two games are what can become a real problem for Real Madrid. Just a few days after playing Espanyol at home, Real Madrid will have to travel against to face Sevilla FC at the Ramon Sanchez Pizjuan Stadium and then they will have to play another Madrid Derby against Atletico before the end of the month. That’s five highly competitive matches in the span of only two weeks. So yeah, Lopetegui needs Mariano at the top of his game as soon as possible and giving him the trust he needs will benefit the club quite a bit during the next month.Qué ganas de volver a pisar este cesped para vosotros #DiaDePartido #HalaMadrid pic.twitter.com/uWFVG4DCRG— Mariano Diaz Mejia (@marianodiaz7) September 1, 2018How do you think Mariano Diaz will respond to Julen Lopetegui’s confidence? Please share your opinion in the comment section down below.last_img read more