Video: Warriors take the first step of the rest of their basketball lives at team’s media day

first_imgThe last time we saw the Golden State Warriors as a group, Klay Thompson was clutching his left knee. Kevin Durant had already left the building, bound for Brooklyn. Andre Iguodala and Shaun Livingston didn’t need bifocals to see the writing on the wall. And a bunch of upstarts from Canada — Canada! — were hoisting the Larry O’Brien trophy.Monday, at the team’s media day, the reimagined Warriors took their first steps of a new age. New players, new building, new resolve. … Related Articleslast_img read more

Free webinar: Mastering the in-person ask

first_imgIf the thought of asking for a donation in person makes you sweat, Network for Good’s next free webinar is for you.Tune in Tuesday, April 16 at 1 p.m. Eastern to hear fundraising expert Jay Frost give nonprofits the insider scoop on garnering support via one of the most powerful methods — the in-person ask.Join us and learn answers to the following: How to ask for donations in a way that is comfortable for youHow to identify your unique asking strengths and best use themWhy asking for gifts doesn’t have to be so scary!Register here.last_img read more

Creating new partnerships for your cause

first_imgWe’ve all heard it before, “Give me your Rolodex, give me 20 names that I can contact.” It can be overwhelming to produce a big list of people who are eager to raise money for your cause. But what if 20 names is 19 too many? What if all you need is just one? This is the idea proposed by philanthropist Jeffrey Walker and fundraising expert Jennifer McCrea in their recent book, The Generosity Network.Reach out.Asking your nonprofit board members for just one person who might be interested in joining your cause will seem more manageable to them and is more likely to generate a thoughtful response. That way, you can meet with someone who is open to starting a relationship with you and—ultimately—your organization.Meet in an intimate setting.Invite your new contact to meet, but beware of asking them to your office! Conference rooms can be beautiful spaces: great for viewing PowerPoints, but actually hosting an intimate first meeting? Forget it! Go to coffee or breakfast so that you can be in a space that is made for conversation. In a coffee shop, sharing your story won’t come across as rehearsed the way it automatically would in a conference room or at someone’s desk. Context is everything.Form a connection.Remember, this first meeting isn’t a sales call; it’s a chance to authentically connect. Be ready to ask what your new contact truly values and consider saying, “For the record, I’m not going to ask you for money today.” If people think you’re just there to extract something from them, they might beworrying about your potential ask. If they’re only half listening, it will be hard to build a relationship of trust and explore a potential partnership. But don’t wait too long to ask for a commitment! It’s important to share what your organization is doing and what you could achieve together.For more ideas on developing a relationship with your donors and how to turn them from one-time customers into lifelong partners, access the archived webinar presentation of Nonprofit 911: Build Your Generosity Network with Jennifer McCrea and Jeff Walker.last_img read more

5 Tips for Streamlining Your Online Fundraising Tools

first_img5 Tips for Streamlining Your Online Fundraising ToolsOnline fundraising tools can make a huge difference in the amount of donations a nonprofit receives. Just being able to accept online donations has increased the reach of many nonprofit organizations, and it allows donors to give whenever they wish, by simply connecting with their smartphones, rather than having to wait until they are home with a checkbook handy.Since the majority of the population accesses the internet regularly, nonprofits are able to communicate with potential donors and share their message more frequently than ever before. Over the years, marketers and publicists have determined which formats are the most effective for brochures, postcards, posters, and other types of material used to promote organizations of all kinds. Donation software has also been developed, tested and re-designed to increase its effectiveness.Fundraising websites are like other websites in some ways, but they have some differences that should not be overlooked. Donation software, in particular, has been found to be most effective if it follows these five guidelines.Donation software should be mobile-friendly. If a potential donor is online using a mobile device and clicks your “donate now” button, but can’t navigate through the donation page on the device’s small screen, you will lose the donation. People are easily frustrated with pages that don’t work well, or are confusing, and leave the page in a matter of seconds.Limit the number of fields requiring input. When a form requires a lot of information, users are likely to leave the page without completing it. This means that even though they fully intended to make a donation when they got to the page, the fundraiser software became a hindrance, rather than a tool for helping them complete the intended action.Avoid links away from the donation page. It may seem appropriate to include a link back to your website or resources for more information on the good work that will be done with the donations you receive, but bear in mind that people are easily distracted—especially online—and interesting links that direct potential donors away from the donation page are stopping the donation process.Limit the amount of text on the page. Your website is a great place to share as much information as possible about your cause and the good work done by your organization. Your donation page should focus only on accepting online donations. A couple of sentences and an image that evokes emotion are enough to keep the donor inspired. Excess text can trigger “fine print” skepticism.Keep it simple. Complex options on a donation form make it less likely that donors will complete it. Fundraising websites should include options for recurring giving, and offer suggested donation amounts that the donor can choose with one click, but never include suggestions such as a percentage of the donor’s income, that would make them stop to think. They are much less likely to complete the form if there is more for them to do.Since 2001, Network for Good has helped over 100,000 nonprofit organizations raise more than $1 billion online. To discuss how we can help you get the most out of your fundraising efforts, contact us today or call 1-888-284-7978 x1.last_img read more

Nonprofit Love: A Music Playlist to Inspire You

first_imgSometimes nonprofit fundraisers and marketers need to take a deep breath and then…rock out. Ok maybe not “rock out,” but listening to music can help spark creativity, help you relax, or pump you up. I reached out to some of my nonprofit friends on Twitter and asked them what they listen to at work to get them “in the zone.” You can see who contributed song ideas in this Storify. Nonprofit Pros! Share with me: what’s your fave song to get you in the “zone” at work?— Liz Ragland (@lizragland) July 28, 2015 The responses were varied: some prefer quiet background music, others want something a little more groovy or fast paced. Whatever your music tastes might be, I think you’ll enjoy the playlist we crafted just for you! Ladies and gentlemen, meet the Nonprofit Love playlist. Thanks to everyone who answered my call for suggestions!last_img read more

How to Use Your Data to Get Closer to Supporters & Prospects

first_imgReach Broader to Fine-Tune Messages, Channels, and TimingDon’t stop with your donor database. Your organization will find equally valuable insights in sources as like your email system, volunteer database, Facebook and Twitter analytics, and online survey findings.These sources provide priceless clues about donor habits. The most reliable way to reach your donors or prospects will always be:Where they already are (For example, in their email inboxes or Facebook accounts).At the times and on the days they tend to be there (when they open or click emails, sign your online petition, or retweet a recent tweet from your organization).You can also use these sources to sharpen your insights into your donors’ passions and values, so you can ensure your campaigns reach and resonate with them. For example, use your volunteer data to find out: How many current or recent donors were volunteers first (and whether they still are or not)? If there’s a significant percentage of donors who entered the organization as volunteers:Consider launching a donor recruitment campaign to current volunteers that features profiles of existing donors who are or were volunteers.If you need to build your volunteer corps, cross-promote those opportunities to similar donors who are not current volunteers.When it comes to data, there’s SO much power in the information that’s already at your fingertips. I can’t wait to hear what you do with it! As a fundraiser, one of the toughest parts of your job is finding (and keeping) loyal donors. This is an especially difficult task in the face of uncertain economic times. Mix in our crazy presidential election ramp up, and you’re left with a foolproof recipe for widespread anxiety and skepticism.I know that these barriers are hard to transcend, but there is a way to build deep and lasting connections with your targeted donors and prospects. And that way is paved with data that you already have. Let me tell you what I mean.Use Giving to Date to Shape Your Future Approach The easiest place to start is with what you already know. Dig into your donor database and focus on donors from the last two years, especially those who are high-ticket givers or have given three or more years in a row.  Retaining these folks is your absolute priority!Don’t have a donor database that can get the job done? Learn more about Network for Good’s newest product for small to mid-sized nonprofits: a donor management system that has everything you need and nothing you don’t. Learn more.Next, look for trends or patterns to help you deliver the strongest possible ask to each donor (or, more realistically, to small groups of donors). Here are two questions you can answer with data you’re likely to have on hand:What do your monthly donors look like? Get a clear picture of your monthly donors, especially those who are newly committed to monthly giving. These folks are loyal and most likely to become long-term supporters.See if other prospects share some of the same characteristics, and then launch a campaign to convert them into monthly donors. Who’s made a significantly larger gift than ever before within the last six months?Make a personal thank you calls (a personal note otherwise), and ask what spurred the latest gift. There may be more donors about to experience the same situation and likely to respond to a focused ask. Plus, these folks may be ripe for major gift prospecting.last_img read more

Jobs and Scholarships in Maternal Health

first_imgPosted on December 5, 2014December 3, 2015Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to email this to a friend (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window)Check out the following opportunities in Maternal HealthJobsResearch Fellow in Qualitative Methods for Impact Evaluation, London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine, Deadline: Thursday, December, 18thResearch Fellow in Epidemiological Methods for Impact Evaluation, London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine, Deadline: Thursday, December, 18thSenior Program Officer, Program Advocacy and Communications for Family Planning, Bill & Melinda Gates FoundationMonitoring and Evaluation Officer, PATH (based in South Africa)Communications Associate, Mobile Alliance for Maternal ActionProject Director for Fistula Care Plus, EngenderHealth ShareEmailPrint To learn more, read: Urban Health Conference ScholarshipSpecial Call for RMNCH Submissions for 12th International Conference on Urban Health, March 8-12, Dhaka, Bangladesh. Deadline: Friday, January 9th, 2015Scholarships are available for applicants from developing countries whose abstracts are accepted for presentationAreas of special interest include addressing disparities in access to maternal, newborn, and child health services, quality of services, and programs that target youth sexual and reproductive health behaviors to prevent unintended pregnancy. Abstracts that address reproductive, maternal, neonatal and child health (RMNCH) in the urban environment, especially approaches that target poor women and women living in slums are encouraged.Questions? Contact Dr. Selmin Jahan, selmin@eminence-bd.orgSubmit your abstract at www.icuh2015.orgShare this:last_img read more

Ryan Murphy and David Miller Donate 10 Million to Childrens Hospital Los

first_imgOn behalf of the Ford Theodore Miller Murphy Family, Emmy-Award winning writer, producer and director Ryan Murphy and his husband, photographer David Miller, have made a landmark $10 million gift to Children’s Hospital Los Angeles (CHLA).Alan Wayne, MD; Araz Marachelian, MD; James Stein, MD; Ryan Murphy and son Logan; David Miller and son Ford; Paul Viviano; Alexandra CarterCredit/Copyright: Keats ElliottIn honor of this incredible gift, CHLA will name the fifth floor of the Marion and John E. Anderson Pavilion the “Ford Theodore Miller Murphy Floor.”“The Miller Murphy family’s generosity will help us continue to provide world-class, lifesaving care to the patients we treat,” says CHLA President and CEO Paul S. Viviano. “This gift reflects the family’s dedication to enhancing the care of children throughout the Los Angeles community.”Funds from this generous gift will be used to support CHLA’s continued leadership in surgical oncology, neuroblastoma treatment and groundbreaking research in the hospital’s Children’s Center for Cancer and Blood Diseases (CCCBD). Specifically, a portion of the funds will be used to name a Chair of Surgical Oncology. The inaugural holder of the new chair will be James Stein, MD, MSc, FACS, FAAP, the hospital’s chief medical officer. Additionally, the donation will be used to support an endowment in neuroblastoma care. Miller and Murphy’s son, Ford, was treated at CHLA for neuroblastoma, the third most common cancer in children and the second most common solid tumor in children, besides brain tumors.“David and I, as well as Logan, [the couple’s older child], are immensely grateful for the care that CHLA provided not only to Ford, but to us as well,” Murphy says. “His cancer diagnosis was one of life’s unexpected moments and the team at the hospital provided a comforting atmosphere in the midst of a trying situation.”“CHLA was an obvious choice for us when we learned of Ford’s diagnosis,” Miller adds. “We needed a support system and their experience with children and parents proved invaluable.”Alexandra Carter, CHLA’s senior vice president and chief development officer, says the gift will be allocated to several areas reflecting the family’s interest in serving the community.“We are thrilled the Miller Murphy family is now forever a part of the CHLA family,” says Carter. “Ryan Murphy and David Miller have a long and admirable history of championing underserved members of our community. Their values and commitment to help others along with their charitable support align with our hospital’s mission to create hope and build healthier futures.”The Ford Theodore Miller Murphy Floor in the Marion and John E. Anderson Pavilion is dedicated to caring for medically and surgically acute patients of all ages. It is a calm and welcoming environment where children can recover from medical treatments or surgery surrounded by family, receive one-on-one care from Child Life specialists and participate in art, music or dance/movement therapy. The floor also features a Child Life playroom and a Creative Oasis room for music and art exploration.James Stein, CHLA’s chief medical officer, has been a surgeon at CHLA since 1996. Nationally renowned, Stein has also participated as a lead surgeon in numerous conjoined twin separation surgeries, procedures that require intense multidisciplinary planning and coordination, and meticulous execution. Stein’s extensive experience in the surgical treatment of neuroblastoma and hepatoblastoma, as well as other childhood cancers, has been an integral component of CHLA’s successful solid tumor and neuroblastoma programs.“Dr. Stein and pediatric oncologist Dr. Araz Marachelian of the CCCBD saved our child’s life,” adds Murphy, “and we shall be forever thankful for that.”The Miller Murphy family’s support of neuroblastoma care through an endowment will permit CHLA to dedicate resources to groundbreaking research and lifesaving clinical care, to provide advanced therapies to children and to improve their quality of life after receiving a diagnosis of neuroblastoma.The family’s gift will also benefit CHLA’s Children’s Center for Cancer and Blood Diseases, a world class program that has increased cure rates and improved quality of survival for patients through innovative research, outstanding clinical care, academic excellence and global leadership. The Center is the largest pediatric hematology, oncology and blood and marrow transplant program in the western United States. It also has one of the largest clinical trial programs for children with cancer and blood disorders in the nation.last_img read more

Football Ohio State honors 19 seniors in final home game of the

Ohio State quarterback J.T. Barrett is honored on the field for Senior Day. Credit: Jack Westerheide | Photo EditorThe Ohio State home fans watched as 19 seniors took the field of Ohio Stadium for the final time Saturday as the group of players were recognized individually just before kickoff of its game against Illinois.Each senior ran out of the tunnel to receive a hug from head coach Urban Meyer and deliver flowers to his parents. Fans cheer on QB @JT_theQB4th as he takes the field one last time in Ohio Stadium. #OSUvsIllinois pic.twitter.com/oFMWsveejZ— Lantern TV (@LanternTV) November 18, 2017On the offensive side of the ball, Ohio State saw quarterbacks J.T. Barrett and Stephen Collier, center Billy Price, left tackle Jamarco Jones, tight end Marcus Baugh and wide receiver Elijaah Goins.On the defensive side of the ball, cornerbacks Trevon Forte and Cin’Quan Haney, defensive tackles Tracy Sprinkle and Michael Hill, defensive lineman Nick Seme, defensive end Tyquan Lewis, safeties Damon Webb, Clay Raterman and Erick Smith and linebackers Jackson Hayes, Zach Turnure and Chris Worley.One of the most decorated players in Ohio State football history, quarterback J.T. Barrett runs onto the field at Ohio Stadium for the final time. pic.twitter.com/sIslwCFPLD— Lantern Sports (@LanternSports) November 18, 2017 read more