How to Make the Case for Social Media

first_img Remember: This isn’t a crusade, it’s a learning experience for everyone. Make sure there IS a good case for your initiative and if it does fail, share and learn from what went wrong. There is no shame in gaining knowledge from mistakes – for you, or your boss. 1. Change the subject. If you’re having a debate over the value of social media, you’re having the wrong discussion. The discussion should be about your organization’s goals – with social media being the means, not the end. 2. Make it about what your boss already wants. Don’t position your idea as a social media initiative; frame it as your initiative to support your boss’s goals, in your boss’s language. Is donor retention a big concern for your Executive Director? Highlight how social media can help keep donors engaged. Does your board want more success stories to showcase? Underscore how social media can help make that happen. 3. Make it about the audience. A good way to depersonalize the debate over social media is to make it about your target audience’s preferences rather than a philosophical tug of war between you and said boss. 4. Sign your boss up to listen.Set up Google Alerts and TweetBeep (email alerts for Twitter mentions) for your boss, so she or he can see that there are already many discussions about your organization happening online. Once this apparent, two things are likely to happen. First, it will become clear that your organization no longer controls your message online – so worrying about social media causing a lack of control is not worth fearing. That day is already here. Second, it will be hard not to want to join those conversations online – which is what social engagement is all about. 5. Set some ground rules. Set a social media policy for your organization, so it’s clear how to respond to what you’re hearing – and what types of initiatives have internal support. 6. Start small. If you’re going to start a social media initiative, start small. Pinpoint where your supporters are and branch out from there. You don’t have to be an overnight social media expert – you just need to be a part of the conversations about your cause. 7. Set a clear goal.Just as with any other marketing effort, establish a specific, measurable goal so you can identify success. 8. Measure and report.Once you’ve identified your approach and have set a goal, ensure that you can track and measure your progress. Most social media platforms have built-in analytics and you can also track Web traffic back to your site through Google Analytics. Be sure to tie your results back to your social media efforts where possible with careful tracking. (This could mean using tracking codes on your donation pages, Google campaign tags or landing pages created specifically for your social media outreach.) Share every little bit of progress and give your boss credit for it! It’s clear that social media is an effective channel for establishing your nonprofit’s brand identity, championing your cause and engaging with current and would-be supporters. So, how do you make sure your organization is on board — especially your boss, executive director or board members? Here are eight tips for making the case for your next social media initiative: center_img Photo Source: Big Stock Photo Adapted from Nonprofit Marketing Blog.last_img read more

Social Media Housekeeping Tips for Nonprofits

first_imgIs it easy to find you on Twitter and Facebook? Include links to your profiles on your website, email newsletters, and staff email signatures. Always include a short description about your organization and a link back to your website in your social media profiles’ “about” section. Think about social media as a way to open the doors of your organization to new guests and friends. But unlike hosting guests at your home for an hour or two, social media is open to guests 24/7. Because of the constant accessibility of social media, keeping profiles tidy all the time is a must. Here are some tips and ideas for social media housekeeping that you can tackle right now:Your social media avatar/profile pictures should mesh with your nonprofit brand and be recognizable to fans of your cause. Consider creating a special page on your nonprofit website that is solely dedicated to visitors from social media. Don’t let replies and comments linger—use them as an opportunity to engage your community. Set up alerts to use social media as a listening platform: @ mentions, hashtags, keywords about your cause, etc. Start tracking and planning your organization’s tweets. Programs such as HootSuite, TweetDeck and Sprout Social can help you plan tweets in advance and monitor replies, mentions, and hashtags. Is your nonprofit’s Facebook profile picture just as good as your cover image? While this may be obvious, it’s worth stating that your Facebook profile picture will be seen more often than your cover image. Be consistent with your hashtags. One small typo could add your tweets to a hashtag conversation that you didn’t intend to join! Don’t forget to post pictures. Photos help your Facebook posts stand out on your fan’s news feeds. Use compelling images to make an emotional connection and engage more supporters with your cause. Encourage more likes, shares, and comments. More likes and shares increase the odds that your post will be seen by friends and friends of friends. Start analyzing the types of posts that get shared the most by exporting your Facebook insights and taking an hour or two to dive into the data.last_img read more

5 rules for thanking donors

first_imgHere at Network for Good we experienced a busy giving season right up to the final hours of 2013. This is good news for nonprofits, as we saw a 16% increase in dollars donated compared to the year-end fundraising season of 2012. After all of that activity, it can be tempting to take it easy for a few weeks now that January is here. Of course, the reality is that your work with donors is just beginning. Now is your opportunity to begin turning year-end donors into your long-term partners in good. To do so, you need a solid plan to welcome these donors, keep them informed, and build relationships with them throughout the year. The first step is to keep the magic alive with a well-planned donor gratitude strategy. Here are some things to keep in mind:Thank your donors as soon as possible. Ideally, your online donors have already received an automatic thank you and receipt, and offline donors are receiving their thank yous in the mail shortly. Thanking donors promptly is not just common courtesy, it’s positive reinforcement of their decision to support and trust your organization.A receipt is not a thank you. Yes, you must make sure your donors get donation receipts that include information on tax deductibility. That said, if the most interesting line your response to a donor’s gift is “No goods or services were received by the donor as a result of this gift,” you’re doing it wrong. (See also: IRS rules on acknowledging contributions.)One thank you is not enough. You’ve acknowledged all of your year-end donations with a proper thank you. You’re done, right? Not so fast. One great thank you is a good start, but don’t forgo regularly thanking donors to keep them up to date on the impact of their gifts. Don’t leave donors wondering, “Whatever happened to that person/animal/cause in need?”Don’t forget other donation sources. Acknowledge every donation your organization receives, whether they come from your direct mail campaign, your online donation page, or from third-party sources such as employee giving programs, peer-to-peer fundraisers, or online giving portals. Understand all of your donation sources and tailor your notes of appreciation, where necessary. New donors coming in from a peer-to-peer campaign, for example, may need a more formal introduction to your organization than donors you’ve directly solicited.Make sure your thank you is sincere and memorable. You may have a template for your donor thank yous, but if your thank you feels like a form letter, it needs more work. Express authentic gratitude for your donors’ generosity and put them in the middle of the work you do. Use photos, quotes, and even video to help bring these stories to life for your supporters. Give donors a thank you so amazing that they can’t wait to show it off to their friends and family. Need some help with your thank you letters? Here are a few resources from our learning center: How to Treat Your Donor Like Your SuperheroKey Qualities for Amazing Thank You Letters3 Things Your Donor Thank You Should Do6 Keys to Donor RetentionAre you sending an amazing thank you this year? Have you received one? Share your examples in the comments and we’ll feature the best ones in an upcoming post!last_img read more

Give Local America: An opportunity to grow online

first_imgNetwork for Good is happy to partner with Kimbia to extend the reach of Give Local America, a nation-wide giving day that marks the 100-year milestone of community foundations in the United States.This national online giving event will take on May 6, 2014. Give Local America is expected to be the largest online giving day ever held on a single platform. Giving days help nonprofits connect with new donors in an easy and efficient way. Give Local America uses the power and pride of local communities to tie it all together. Want to find out more and get involved? To sign up, visit www.givelocalamerica.org, find your city, and follow the easy registration process.last_img read more

The most important holiday for all fundraisers

first_imgThanks to the most-photogenic NFGers for reminding us why it’s important to #beyourdonor on October 24th!Network for Good’s favorite holiday is this month. Although we do love Halloween, October 24this Be Your Donor Day and the reason why we celebrate big this month! Sometimes fundraisers are so caught up in the day to day that we forget how important our donors are to our organization’s success. Without understanding how our donors interact with our organization, what the donation process looks like from a donors’ point of view, and how donors are thanked for their gift, we can’t do much to improve (or overhaul!) the process.It takes more effort to bring in a new donor than to retain an existing donor. Once a donor starts a relationship with your organization, do your best to ensure that donor has a positive experience. That’s why we want all fundraisers to join in and celebrate this very important holiday. Block out some time on October 24th and do an audit of your donor communication. Make sure your all your fundraising activities are donor-centric. Don’t know where to start? Here are some ideas:· Your home page’s Donate Now button should take less than 5 seconds to locate and donors shouldn’t have to make more than one click to get to your donation page. · Thank you letters should talk less about how much your organization does and should instead talk more about what a donor’s gifts does. · Your organization’s contact information should be easy to find on your website, letterhead, emails, and gift receipts. And when a donor does call, promptly answer questions.We recommend you download our complete Be Your Donor Day checklist and check out all your fundraising activities for “donor-centricness”. Be your donor on October 24th and be your organization’s fundraising superhero!last_img read more

No Kitties or Puppies. HELP! (Step Two)

first_imgReview Step One In Step One of this two-part post, I shared my take on why this type of emotional candy works so well to raise money or recruit volunteers. I cited a reliable litmus test for photo impact—would you share it with your own family and friends, and would they “like” or share it? Here are some recommendations, with examples: For policy and intermediary organizations: Connect the dots between your work and the people who are the ultimate beneficiaries. If your organization is not an animal rescue or somehow directly related to puppies, kitties, or babies, these alternatives will be far more effective in helping you forge connections and motivate giving. Most important, they are authentic, relevant expressions, rather than manipulative clickbait. Organizations like yours have it even harder when building relationships and motivating action, be it giving or something else. That’s because your work is indirect. For all causes and organizations: Highlight the similarities between your audiences and your organization’s clients, participants, or beneficiaries. Get detailed and personal in words and/or photos. The close-up (bottom left) of the little girl focused on drawing is compelling! Clearly, we never want anyone to be homeless, much less our own family. The cause has the potential to scare off supporters because of their fear that it could happen to them. Stigma! However, by photographing an older resident (like your grandma or mine) reading to a couple of kids, Hope House busts through and connects us with the residents in a positive way. (I remember when my grandma read to me.) The Findlay-Hancock County Community Foundation does a great job of this on its Facebook page, as shown in the post above. Here, the foundation makes it easy to make the connection between its work and the individuals who benefit from its grants for a real “aha!” moment.center_img The details are what sticks (or doesn’t) and make your story memorable and more likely to be shared. How do you make your organization’s content compelling—beyond kitties, puppies, or babies? Please share your recommendations in the comments! You’re working on legislation related to a cause or supporting other cause organizations. This makes it challenging for prospects to connect emotionally. It takes your audience time and thought to make the connection between your impact and people, which is always a deterrent. Findlay Hope House does a great job of this on its Facebook page time and time again. Consider the post above, showing kids without homes living in Hope House’s transitional housing. But there is a great method of speeding that vital connection—make the message for your prospects and supporters. Connect the dots between your organization’s work and impact and your ultimate beneficiaries, even if there are layers in between. Okay, your organization is one of many that can’t use kitty or puppy photos to raise money or recruit volunteers. So what can you do to quickly and effectively connect with the emotions of prospects and supporters? Step 2: Make emotional connections and compelling content—if not candy—even without the supercute. Review Step One With refreshing practicality, Nancy Schwartz rolls up her sleeves to help nonprofits develop and implement strategies to build strong relationships that inspire key supporters to action. She shares her deep nonprofit marketing insights—and passion—through consulting, speaking, and her popular blog and e-news at GettingAttention.org.last_img read more

4 Fundraising Ideas to Develop Your Fundraising Plan

first_img“A goal without a plan is just a wish.” ― Antoine de Saint-ExupéryEmbarking on a new year—whether it’s a calendar or fiscal year (or both!)—is always an opportunity for a fresh start.  After all, that’s why resolutions are written at the start of a new year.  New year. New goals.  It’s the same with writing a development plan for your nonprofit, which you can think of as a business plan for fundraising. It helps you develop the discipline of looking at what you’ve done well and where you need to improve, setting your sights for the year ahead, and mapping out what you will do to reach your goals. Simply put, it translates your wishes to goals.Let’s pause for a moment to think about the 30,000-foot view. Fundraising is not just about raising money. The core of our work as fundraisers is as relationship architects between our organizations and the donors who currently or, we hope will eventually, support us. Our goal is to create two-way conversations that are not transactional or circular exchanges of asking and receiving money. We know this isn’t sustainable in the long-term. A development plan is more than just a set of lists, calendars, and activities.  It’s a strategic compilation of all the ways you can connect and communicate with your donors which, if done effectively, leads to increased revenue. It’s a competitive market out there. There are 1.8 million nonprofits in the US with about 75,000 new ones registering with the IRS each year. If you feel like the room is getting crowded, so do our donors. What makes the difference to them is if they feel valued by you and connected to your organization. If not, they’ll go somewhere else to give.So, your development plan should focus on four key areas:1. Balancing your portfolio:If your funding generally comes from one source more than others, it’s time to think about how to rebalance things. This might mean looking at how to welcome more individual donors instead of relying primarily on foundations and/or corporations. It could also mean thinking about others ways to build donor relationships besides the one major gala or one major direct mail appeal you do each year. Putting all your eggs in the proverbial basket is not sustainable.2. Setting the stage for major gifts:Every organization no matter how small can, and should, be raising major gifts. A successful major gifts program does not focus on high net-worth individuals with no connection to your organization. In fact, you probably already know who your major (current and potential) donors are. Your next major gift will likely come from one of these donors who has the capacity and who has been supporting you for a long time (and not at particularly high levels) and may also have been involved as a volunteer. Carving out a little time for more personal interactions with these donors will help you qualify those who can make larger gifts down the road.3. Creating greater donor engagement:It’s easy to become complacent and think that just because donors have chosen to invest in our cause, they will unconditionally support us and that when we ask again they will give. Nonprofits on average lose more than 60% of their donors each year because they haven’t figured out the right way to connect with their donors. Good donor engagement involves a regular calendar of touchpoints, updates, and communications that highlights stories of successes, progress, results, and even failures and challenges. Donors want to see, feel, and touch the impact their gifts are having. They want a donor relationship and an exceptional donor experience. You are most likely already doing it without defining these activities in that way: annual reports, newsletters, special webinars hosted by your key program leadership, holiday and birthday cards are all examples of ways to leverage communications to enhance your relationships with your donors.4. Laying the foundation for tomorrow:Without question, your limited bandwidth should be focused on donor retention because once you lose the donors who already opted to give to you, it’s hard to get them back. That said, it is still important to plant the seeds for the next pipeline of donors to your organization. The best potential new donor names are people who self-identify in some way or who are connected in some way to you. Perhaps it’s through a sign-up on your website, following you on social media, attendance at an event, or a visitor book if prospective donors can visit your facilities. This is also a way board members and other volunteers can play a key role in introducing your organization to their networks.  Every follower, volunteer, and the new name that crosses your doorway should be considered a potential investor in your work. Welcome them.For more thoughts on how to propel your nonprofit forward, download our free Fundraising Plan eGuide or hire Network for Good personal fundraising coach to Building Stronger Donor Engagement and Raising More Money, as we explore this topic in greater detail.last_img read more

5 New Year Resolutions Every Fundraiser Should Make

first_imgYou know what takes a lot of inspiration and a truckload of guts?  Fundraising.I learned this the hard way when I started a nonprofit in the living room of my apartment with just $500 and a credit card.  There were days when I second guessed myself but ten years later we raised over 10 million dollars and have been featured on Oprah, CNN, and the Today show.  Last year, Girlstart turned 20.  I’ve learned a lot since then, including how to get the absolute best fundraising results in the shortest possible time using scientifically proven methods.So what tips do I have for you to make 2018 your best year ever?  Lots!  Are you ready to ring in the new year raising more?  Here are 5 New Year resolutions I want EVERY fundraiser to make:1. Resolve to learn more about your donors.Why did they give to your organization – what connected to them? What programs do they care about?  What motivated them to give in the first place?  What was the best gift they ever gave and why?  Of all the organizations they support which one does the best job engaging them?  What are their top three philanthropic priorities?  What do they love about what they do?  How do they prefer to be communicated with?  You can ask some of these questions when you call them to thank them just for being a donor and others in a visually rich donor survey.2. Resolve to learn from your data.Do you know what your donor retention rate is? If you don’t know how you’re currently performing, setting goals to improve is meaningless. You can examine retention overall or narrow it down to first-time donors and/or major donors. You can calculate retention by the number of donors or gift value.  I personally recommend examining by gift value so you know exactly what your retention rate is costing your organization.  To run your numbers, decide on your 12 month date range (a calendar year or your fiscal year) and add the donor gift amounts by annual “class” i.e. the class of major donors giving $1,000 or more in 2017 (or the class of all 1st time donors in 2017) and then divide that amount by what those same donors gave to you the previous year, in 2016.  In other words, if you had 1,000 first time donors in 2016 and only 200 of those made another gift in 2017 your new donor retention rate would be 20%.  Why does retention matter so much?  Acquiring those donors cost you money, time and effort.  As Roger Craver, author of Retention Fundraising, advises, “Taking actionable steps to reduce donor losses is the least expensive way to increase your fundraising income.”3. Resolve to make your donors FEEL something.This is one of my biggest pet peeves in fundraising. Giving is such a joyous experience but so much of our communications can feel bland and lifeless. Does your appeal or acknowledgment make your donor feel great about themselves? It should. What we feel is irrelevant. What our donors feel is the only thing that matters. While we’re busy trying to educate our donors, or boasting about how awesome our programs are, our donor might be tossing our letter in the trash. Communicate in a warm, friendly, personable tone. Make the donor feel like gushing over what they made possible. If your autoresponders sound like a robot wrote them, it’s time for a rewrite in 2018!4. Set a revenue goal for every donor in your portfolio.Base your appeal goals on your donor’s capacity, inclination, prior giving, and interests.  Now you’re ready for your best fundraising year ever!  What’s more, when your CEO walks in and tells you about a budget shortfall you’ve got solid ground to push back on unrealistic goals.5. Resolve to dedicate 30 minutes a day to call and personally thank donors.Don’t start with the biggest and then fall off the wagon on this goal come February.  If you can, include new donors to your call list.  Be prepared with a few great discovery questions and opportunities for them to engage with you deeper.  Before you know it, your lower level donors will be major gift prospects.  The secret is you have to STICK WITH IT.  Put it on your calendar as a recurring appointment when your energy levels are at their peak.  Don’t forget to smile while you’re talking or leaving a message.I’d love to share more of my secrets with you – Download the NFG Masterclass Webinar Fundraising Strategy Series with “The Secrets of High Performing Fundraisers”.  Want more help?  I have OODLES of guides to make your fundraising EASIER.Here’s to 2018!Learn more about our guest blogger:Rachel Muir, CFRE transforms individuals into confident, successful fundraisers through workshops and retreats.  When she was 26 years old, Rachel Muir launched Girlstart, a non-profit organization to empower girls in math, science, engineering and technology in the living room of her apartment with $500 and a credit card.  Several years later she had raised over 10 million dollars and was featured on Oprah, CNN, and the Today show. Learn more about Rachel at www.rachelmuir.com or follow her at facebook.com/rachelmuirfundraising and on Twitter @rachelmuir.last_img read more

2 Questions Before Planning Your Next Nonprofit Event

first_imgTruth be told, I have a love/hate relationship with events. I love getting dressed up to attend a fancy benefit. On the other hand, I’ve seen too many organizations host events because their leaders felt they “should.”Without strategy or follow-up, events waste an organization’s limited resources and leave an exhausted staff in their wake. Events are also expensive. In fact, it costs 40 cents to raise $1 at an event while it costs just 15 cents to raise that same dollar through major gifts.So, why do organizations continue to host events? Because, as Claire Axelrad wrote in her recent post, events offer an invaluable opportunity to deepen stakeholders’ engagement with your organization. That’s why more organizations are going beyond the traditional gala or golf tournament to develop events like festivals and intimate dinners to connect with donors in new and unique ways.That leaves just one question: how do we make the most of events? My answer is, to paraphrase John Donne, “no event is an island.” That means your events need to play a pivotal role in your organization’s overall fundraising and solicitation strategies.Before you plan an event, ask yourself two questions:Does this event connect to my organization’s overall fundraising activities, donor outreach, and messaging?How will I maximize fundraising success at this event by leveraging my committee and sponsorships?Let me share an example:Say that your organization holds a large annual gala. It’s an event that your donors and larger audience look forward to every year. To answer the first question, consider how you can make this event the culmination of a series of smaller events, touch points, and other outreach you’ve organized throughout the year. Do you carry the same theme throughout the year? Do you ensure that donor recognition is integrated into the event? How will you introduce new attendees (and prospects) to your work?It’s also important to consider if your attendees come away really understanding what you do. All messaging should celebrate your donors’ role in your organization’s impact as well as the vision you are inviting attendees to share with you. Conducting a survey can be a great way to find out what your attendees learned. If they can’t share any substantive message about what you do, you’ve probably held a nice party, but not inspired your attendees to action (yet!) That’s where your follow-up is essential.Now, on to question two:In terms of fundraising success, I like to think of a large gala like a mini-campaign. How much can you raise with that event? Do you have the capacity to set and reach a lofty fundraising goal? Set specific fundraising targets for the event co-chairs, committee, board, and even honorees, if possible. Give your host committee clear expectations of what you want each member to “give and get.” This creates a blueprint that will hopefully drive a sense of each person’s role in the event’s success. It also helps you determine the three kinds of host committee members you need:Those who have the personal capacity and networks to connect you with sponsors.Those who are the “worker bees” without capacity and networks.Those who will only give their name and nothing else.The ideal event leadership committee should be a balance of all three kinds of volunteers.Then, take a look at the event’s sponsor giving levels. Are the benefits and recognition opportunities appealing and easy for you to deliver? Just as you create a campaign prospect pipeline comprised of many more prospects than gifts needed, review previous event sponsors as well as those who declined sponsorship offers in the past. Then, and most important, draw on your host committee’s networks to expand your reach and ensure you have more than enough prospects to solicit for each sponsor level.Finally, if your events really are an integrated part of your fundraising, your sponsorship asks should be tied to overall donor strategies. When you identify an event sponsor, list all the ways you would like that donor to support your organization that year. These may include:Sponsoring another event.Supporting a particular program that interests them.Giving an unrestricted annual gift (which I recommend is an automatic ask of all event sponsors).Meet with past event sponsors early in your fiscal year and share with them the full menu of funding requests you’d like them to consider. That enables you to make one ask—avoiding the multiple solicitation syndrome—and shows the donor that you have thought through all the ways they can be engaged in your work. It can also help you better forecast your fiscal year event revenue because you are asking early enough in the year.There’s no question that events are a lot of work. But they can be profitable for you in terms of revenue and volunteer engagement if you use them as one part of your overall development strategy.last_img read more

New Jobs and Internships in Maternal, Newborn and Child Health

first_imgShare this: ShareEmailPrint To learn more, read: Posted on August 30, 2019Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to email this to a friend (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window)Interested in a position in reproductive, maternal, newborn, child or adolescent health? Every month, the Maternal Health Task Force rounds up job and internship postings from around the globe.AfricaReproductive Health Program Management Advisor: PSI; Niamey, NigerSenior Advisor, Community Engagement: Save the Children; Bamako, MaliSenior Social and Behavior Change Advisor: Save the Children; Bamako, MaliM&E Director, Continuum of Care, Technical Assistance: PATH; Lusaka, Zambia (must have legal authorization to work in Zambia)Advocacy and Policy Manager, Advocacy and Public Policy: PATH; Kampala, Uganda (must have legal authorization to work in Uganda)Reproductive & Maternal Health Project Associate: Partners in Health; Kono, Sierra LeoneAsiaTechnical Director: Jhpiego; Afghanistan (Afghan nationals are strongly encouraged to apply)Program Director, Reproductive, Maternal, Newborn, Child and Adolescent Health: PATH; New Delhi, IndiaNorth AmericaCommunications and Influence Manager: Jacaranda Health; Durham, NCSPO, Child Survival and Surveillance: Gates Foundation; Seattle, WADivision Chief, Maternal, Child, and Family Health: State of Illinois; Cook County, ILSenior Program Specialist Maternal and Child Health: International Development Research Center; Ottawa, ON, CanadaResearch Assistant II, Delivery Decisions: Ariadne Labs; Boston, MANational Director, Research, Evaluation & Data: Planned Parenthood; New York, NYSenior Data Analyst: Planned Parenthood; US RemoteTORCH Reproductive Health Educator: National Institute for Reproductive Health; New York, NYOnline Communications Assistant, Media and Communications Branch, Division of Communications and Strategic Partnerships (DCS): UNFPA; New York, NY (Closing date: 26 September 2019 – 5:00pm EST)Maternal and Newborn Health Lead, MOMENTUM: Save the Children; Washington DCFamily Planning/Reproductive Health Lead, MOMENTUM: Save the Children; Washington DCSRHR Resource Mobilization Intern – US Government: CARE; Atlanta, GATechnical Lead, Immunizations, Maternal, Newborn, Child Health and Nutrition: PATH; Washington DC—Is your organization hiring? Please contact us if you have maternal health job or internship opportunities that you would like included in our next job roundup.last_img read more

Security reproductive rights investment how politics touched us this week

first_imgOTTAWA – Piercing the winter doldrums was the political goal of the week for all three party leaders.Justin Trudeau took to town halls in Quebec and northern Ontario to show he is a man of the people.Andrew Scheer went to Washington to talk up the benefits of NAFTA and show he is a statesman-in-waiting.And Jagmeet Singh invited media to peek in at his marriage proposal to designer Gurkiran Kaur, to show he is a man of Instagram.Spectacle aside, the week in Canadian politics revealed developments in global security, reproductive rights and the health of business investment. Here’s how:GLOBAL SECURITYThe jury is still out over whether Tuesday’s foreign ministers’ meeting in Vancouver, co-hosted by Canada and the United States, hurt or helped ease the tension around North Korea and its nuclear arsenal.The summit saw the foreign ministers declare their dedication to United Nations sanctions in an effort to force North Korea to de-nuclearize. They also sent a signal to China and Russia, who were not invited to the meeting, that they were not doing enough to enforce the sanctions effort.And U.S. Secretary of State Rex Tillerson pointed to North Korea’s plans to participate in the Olympics next month in South Korea as proof that the U.S. approach to North Korea — which has included aggressive tweeting between leaders Donald Trump and Kim Jong Un — actually works.But China and Russia did not take kindly to their exclusion from the meeting.And by the end of the week, North Korea was perhaps showing cold feet on the Olympics, cancelling a scheduled visit to South Korea to prepare for the event.REPRODUCTIVE RIGHTSThe Liberals launched another youth-oriented program this week with an insistence that groups receiving government funding actively declare they are pro-choice.The prime minister used an Instagram video to roll out the new Canada Service Corps, which earmarks $105 million over three years to helping young people with volunteer work.Like the Canada Summer Jobs program, where any group seeking funding will need to check a box declaring its pro-choice credentials, similar criteria are being used to determine eligibility for service corps funds. Trudeau says government money should not go to groups that don’t respect women’s rights.The move has prompted a debate over ideology, the reach of the charter, freedom of religion and whether the Liberals have gone too far. On Friday, the abortion rights group that drove the pro-choice requirement for the Canada Summer Jobs program wondered aloud if the Liberals had overstepped.The Conservatives, for their part, have accused Trudeau of imposing his values on others. But they want to know more about the program requirements before they go further in their criticism.Trump, meanwhile, addressed an anti-abortion march on Friday in Washington, where he insisted that Americans are becoming more anti-abortion all the time.QUEASY INVESTORSThe on-again-off-again future of the North American Free Trade Agreement is not sitting well with companies doing business in Canada, and the uncertainty is starting to bite, the Bank of Canada warned this week.Central bank governor Stephen Poloz says NAFTA uncertainty and pro-business tax cuts in the United States are driving investment away from Canada, hurting the Canadian economy.Policy-makers have long had their eye on Canada’s lacklustre business investment record, looking at ways to turn it around.So the central bank’s findings put pressure on the federal government to seek a quicker resolution to the renegotiation of NAFTA. Negotiations meet in Montreal in coming days for their sixth round of talks. Progress towards a resolution has been sparse, and there are growing fears the United States is losing its patience.And Canadian associations representing big and small businesses alike are raising the alarm about Canada losing a competitive edge on the tax front.Ottawa has argued repeatedly, however, that Canada’s investment regime remains as attractive as ever. Trudeau is heading to Davos this coming week to mingle with the rich and famous to pitch that very message to multinational corporations he hopes to lure to here.Note to readers: This is a corrected story. An earlier version said Canada Service Corps applicants would need to check a box to declare their pro-choice stance.last_img read more

In era of news deserts no easy fix for local news struggles

first_imgNEW YORK — The local news industry hasn’t been the subject of much good news itself lately.Newspaper circulation is down sharply, and so is employment in the newspaper industry. Financial cutbacks have led to the shutdown of nearly 1,800 daily and weekly newspapers since 2004, and given rise to new terminology to describe what’s left in their wake. “News deserts” describes parts of the country no longer covered by daily journalists, while “ghost newspapers” is a term for publications with much more limited circulation and ambition.Facebook’s $300 million donation Tuesday to fund local news initiatives helped put the problem in focus. So did the ownership bid for the Gannett company, publisher of USA Today and several daily newspapers, by a company known for making sharp financial cutbacks.David Bauder, The Associated Presslast_img read more

Fort St John Fire Department responds to small kitchen fire

first_imgFire officials say there were three pet cats in the residence at the time and all three were safely recovered, two by the occupant and one by the Fire Department.Fire damage was contained to the kitchen area with smoke damage throughout the residence.The Fire Department determined that the home did not have a working smoke alarm.Fire officials are reminding residents to practice safe cooking practices in the kitchen and to ensure that you have working smoke alarms in your home. FORT ST. JOHN, B.C. – The Fort St. John Fire Department responded to a small kitchen fire at the Peace Country Mobile Home Park on Tuesday at approximately 11:00 a.m.According to the Fire Department, a female occupant was cooking and fell asleep on the couch. She was awakened by the sound of the fire and was able to get out on her own.She was taken to the hospital by B.C. Ambulance to be checked out for smoke inhalation.last_img read more

SC notice to Centre and EC for allegedly violating its order

first_imgNew Delhi: The Supreme Court on Friday issued notice to the Centre and the EC on a plea seeking initiation of contempt proceedings for alleged violation of the apex court’s judgment directing all candidates to declare their criminal antecedents to the poll panel before contesting elections.A bench comprising Justices R F Nariman and Vineet Saran also sought response from the three deputy election commissioners, law secretary and the cabinet secretary for not complying with its judgment dated September 25, 2018. Also Read – Uddhav bats for ‘Sena CM’The court was hearing a plea filed by lawyer Ashwini Kumar Upadhyay. In September last year, a five-judge Constitution bench had unanimously held that all candidates will have to declare their criminal antecedents to the Election Commission(EC) before contesting polls and had called for wider publicity, through print and electronic media about the antecedents of candidates. On October 10 last year, the EC had issued notification regarding the amended Form-26, and directions to political parties and candidates for publication of criminal antecedents. Also Read – Farooq demands unconditional release of all detainees in J&KHowever, the plea filed by Upadhyay had alleged that the EC neither amended the Election Symbol Order, 1968 nor the model code of conduct (MCC) so the said notification has no legal sanction. “On October 10, 2018, the ECI issued direction to political parties and candidates for publication of criminal antecedents without amending the Election Symbol Order & Model Code of Conduct so the direction has no legal sanction,” the plea had said. It had also said that the ECI did not publish a list of leading newspapers-news channels nor clarified the timing for declaration of criminal antecedents by candidates which led to the candidates publishing them in unpopular newspapers and news channels during odd hours. “It (the ECI) had not published list of leading newspapers-news channels, so candidates published criminal antecedents in unpopular newspapers-news channels. The ECI has not clarified the timing of publication, so candidates published criminal history in odd hours when people don’t watch news channels. Political parties had neither published the details on website nor in newspapers or news channels during assembly elections, but the ECI did nothing against them,” the plea had alleged. “On March 10, the ECI announced the dates of General Election without amending the Election Symbol Order & Model Code of Conduct, which is essential for compliance of Judgment dated 25.9.2018 hence petitioner is filing the contempt petition,” it had said.last_img read more

Seoul cancels permit for new Japanese embassy building

first_imgSeoul: Authorities in Seoul have cancelled the permit for a new Japanese embassy building citing construction delays, local officials said Wednesday, with relations between South Korea and Tokyo strained by historical disputes. The neighbours are both democracies, market economies and US allies faced with an increasingly assertive China and the long-running threat of nuclear-armed North Korea. But their own ties have remained icy for years due to bitter rows stemming from Japan’s brutal 1910-45 colonial rule of the Korean peninsula, with forced labour and wartime sex slavery key examples. Also Read – Saudi Crown Prince ‘snubbed’ Pak PM, recalled jet from USA statue of a “comfort woman” symbolising the Korean women forced to work in Japanese military brothels mostly during World War II stands across the road from the embassy plot. Since 1992 campaigners have held weekly rallies at the site to demand a “full, heartfelt apology” for wartime sex slavery from Tokyo. The 1,382th such gathering took place Wednesday, with activists surrounding the statue. The previous embassy building was demolished some years ago, with staff moving into offices in the neighbouring high-rises, and the plot is now a patch of bare earth behind a high wall, vines growing through the surrounding barbed wire. Also Read – Record number of 35 candidates in fray for SL Presidential pollsCity authorities gave permission for a new six-storey building in 2015, the year Seoul and Tokyo signed a controversial deal to settle the wartime sex slavery issue. But construction — which under South Korean law must start within a year of a permit being received — was repeatedly delayed. Japan argues that the “comfort women” statue is against the 2015 bilateral agreement, under which Tokyo offered an apology and a one-billion yen payment. But South Korean President Moon Jae-in said last year that the deal had been signed by his ousted predecessor Park Geun-hye without consulting the Korean victims and disbanded a foundation set up with the Japanese funds. An official at the Jongno Ward Office in Seoul said: “We had a meeting with Japanese officials in February, and they said they will accept the revocation of the permit as they cannot start the construction work due to circumstances in their home country.”last_img read more