₹100 zero-fuel ‘bulb’ shines bright

first_imgLet there be light, the engineers thought. And they used not electricity, but just a dome, a pipe and sunlight. They named it ‘Surya Jyoti’, and it dispels the darkness in the homes of the poor.The micro-solar dome started as a pilot project to stream diffused sunlight into poorly-lit rooms through the roof in thatched, tiled or tin-roofed houses in the Sundarbans in West Bengal and in Tripura. Now, it has been commercialised.“It works on the principle of capturing sunlight using a micro-solar dome. The light is filtered through a PVC pipe with a highly reflective lining. Bright light emerges at the other end (within the room) through a glass shade,” said S.P. Gon Chaudhuri, former director of the West Bengal Renewable Energy Development Agency and now the chairman of the Helsinki-based International Solar Innovation Council.Easy to installA roof-tile can be removed to install this, and it works equally well in a tin-roofed building too.The device has been developed by N.B. Institute for Rural Technology and adopted by the Centre’s Department of Science and Technology under its Technological Advancement for Rural Areas programme. The device, priced between ₹100-300, comes in three models. Around 5,000 solar domes are in use in the slums of Delhi and in West Bengal, Tripura, Assam, Madhya Pradesh, Karnataka and Uttarakhand. The Science and Technology Ministry estimates that ‘Surya Jyoti’ can help some 10 million households. These are off-grid, in urban and rural areas, without reliable access to electricity. The domes provide light equivalent to a 60W bulb.Anupam Baral, who owns Geetanjali Enterprises, a solar equipment firm, said his company was making the domes. Besides a basic model, two others come fitted with solar photo-voltaic panels and a lithium-ion battery to store energy when sunlight is scarce, also enabling mobile device charging. Recently, Central Electronics, a PSU, was asked to make the domes, Mr. Gon Chaudhuri said.last_img read more

Maoists set fire to six trucks, three earth movers in Chhattisgarh

first_imgDays after two security camps were set up in Dantewada district, Maoists set ablaze six trucks and three earth movers at the National Mineral Development Corporation compound at Kirandul in the district. “The incident occurred at 11 a.m. at a construction site. The trucks belonged to a private contractor employed by the NMDC. Maoists fled the spot after setting the trucks ablaze,” said Sundarraj P., Deputy Inspector General of Police, South Bastar Range. The Maoists were feeling the heat after permanent security camps were set up in Potali and Chikpal in the district, he added. “This is their standard modus operandi to make their presence felt. This way, they try to boost the morale of tribals.”Stating that roads were being constructed in the area, Mr. Sundarraj said the security forces have launched a search operation. On November 12, the police had fired in the air to disperse a crowd of 500 villagers that descended on the Potali security camp to oppose it. A day later, the police claimed it held a “positive interaction” with those residing within the camp’s security perimeter. In June, the tribals forced the NMDC to stop operations at five iron ore mines at the Bailadila hills for six days, protesting against a mining proposal at a hill they consider sacred. Meanwhile, the Sukma police have gunned down two Maoists in the Chintagufa police station limits and recovered a hoard of arms and ammunitions, said a note from the police. Vanjam Bhima and Kawasi Soma, of the Jagargunda area committee, were part of a group that ambushed a police party. “The police fired in self-defence. The Maoists retreated into the forest and hills,” said the police.last_img read more

New Oklahoma State Football Video

first_imgThis is pretty awesome — wish we could get something like it for hoops.Shout out to my boy TS for putting it together.If you’re looking for the comments section, it has moved to our forum, The Chamber. You can go there to comment and holler about these articles, specifically in these threads. You can register for a free account right here and will need one to comment.If you’re wondering why we decided to do this, we wrote about that here. Thank you and cheers!last_img

Emphasis On Trafficking In Persons July 23 To 30

first_img The town hall meeting will be held at the Cathedral of St. Jago De La Vega at 5:00 p.m. on Thursday, July 27, following the country tours on the same day. The Ministry of Justice will be hosting a series of activities to commemorate Trafficking in Persons Week from July 23 to 30, aimed at raising awareness of the offence and having the public recognize it as a national issue. Story Highlights Manager of the Trafficking in Persons Secretariat at the Ministry, Keshia West, said the Week will be highlighted by country tours in Rocky Point, Clarendon; and Spanish Town, St. Catherine, as well as a town hall meeting in St. Catherine. The Ministry of Justice will be hosting a series of activities to commemorate Trafficking in Persons Week from July 23 to 30, aimed at raising awareness of the offence and having the public recognize it as a national issue.Manager of the Trafficking in Persons Secretariat at the Ministry, Keshia West, said the Week will be highlighted by country tours in Rocky Point, Clarendon; and Spanish Town, St. Catherine, as well as a town hall meeting in St. Catherine.The town hall meeting will be held at the Cathedral of St. Jago De La Vega at 5:00 p.m. on Thursday, July 27, following the country tours on the same day.“We are inviting citizens to come out, get information on Trafficking in Person and have their questions addressed. We want them to know that human trafficking is real in Jamaica and they should get the information to find out how to guard against becoming a victim,” Ms. West told  JIS News.Participants at  the town hall meeting will include the Permanent Secretary and Head of the National Task Force Against Trafficking in Persons (NATFATIP), Carol Palmer; Head of the Anti-Trafficking in Persons Unit at the Jamaica Constabulary Force (JCF), Deputy Superintendent of Police,  Carl Berry; Director of Safety and Security in the Ministry of Education, Youth and Information; Assistant Superintendent  of  Police, Coleridge Minto; and Spanish Town Mayor, Councillor Norman Scott.The country tours will feature the dissemination of material and literature, and will see the experts interfacing with the public and facilitating discussions.Ms. West further advised that the Ministry of Justice, through NATFATIP, will also be screening a locally made documentary titled ‘Rescue’, which seeks to highlight the impact and extent of human trafficking Jamaica, as well as create awareness of the methods utilized by traffickers to recruit potential victims.“This is an activity that we are very passionate about; we are really enthusiastic. A lot of work has gone into the production and we believe it is important for persons to gain an understanding of what our situation is in Jamaica,” she said.The documentary, to be screened at the Ministry’s offices on July 24 and 28, is expected to be aired on commercial media.Additional initiatives for Trafficking in Persons Week include the pinning of local dignitaries and officials with the ‘blue heart’, signifying the local adoption of the universal symbol, the blue heart, in honour of human trafficking victims.This will be done at a press conference on Monday, July 24, at the Ministry.A church service on Sunday, July 23, at the Pentecostal City Mission Church, 11-15 Blount Street, Hannah Town in West Kingston, will kick start  the week’s activities.“The hosting of Trafficking in Persons Week seeks to raise awareness in Jamaica. The Government is well aware of the impact of human trafficking on victims and we believe it is a collaborative effort that will be required to stem this tide in Jamaica, so we are encouraging persons to come out to the various activities,” Ms. West said.July 30 is recognized globally as World Day Against Human Trafficking.The Week’s activities are being held under the theme: ‘Stop Human Trafficking: Everybody’s Business’.last_img read more