A familiar foe visits Canyons

first_img AD Quality Auto 360p 720p 1080p Top articles1/5READ MOREBlues bury Kings early with four first-period goals Javonte Holmes has a team-high six interceptions for the Cougars, and Joey La Rocque has registered 11 sacks, 80 tackles, two interceptions and two fumble recoveries. Bakersfield is led by quarterback Thomas Peregrin, the Renegades’ career passing leader. Against Fullerton last week, Peregrin completed 17 of 25 passes for 200 yards and three touchdowns, giving him a school-record 27 touchdown passes. Canyons needs two wins to reach its second consecutive state championship appearance. The Southern California champion will face Reedley (11-0) or City College of San Francisco (10-1) in Fresno on Dec. 10. Kevin Connelly, (818) 713-3607 dnlasports@dailynews.com SOUTHERN CALIFORNIA REGIONAL SEMIFINALS TODAY’S GAMES Bakersfield (9-2) at College of the Canyons (11-0), 7 p.m. Grossmont (10-1) at El Camino (11-0), 7 p.m. 160Want local news?Sign up for the Localist and stay informed Something went wrong. Please try again.subscribeCongratulations! You’re all set! College of the Canyons’ football team has won its past 25 games – claiming last year’s state title in the process – but the streak has not come without tense moments, such as when the top-ranked Cougars needed a final-minute touchdown pass from Marcel Marquez to Billy Omahen to win 24-23 at Bakersfield on Oct. 1. Canyons (11-0) will be home for the rematch tonight with Bakersfield (9-2), a Southern California semifinal showdown, with Marquez looking to lead the Cougars to the Dec. 3 SoCal final against El Camino (11-0) or Grossmont (10-1). Marquez, a sophomore, has completed 162 of 270 passes for 2,681 yards and 23 touchdowns and rushed 141 times for 466 yards and a team-high 11 touchdowns, helping Canyons average 449 yards total offense. Terence Scott leads Canyons with 40 receptions for 865 yards and seven touchdowns. Canyons’ defense has been exceptional, intercepting 22 passes, forcing 11 fumbles, scoring seven touchdowns and surrendering just 243.6 yards per game. last_img read more

Strategy Roundtable For Entrepreneurs: VCs, Angels, Incubators, Accelerators – What Are You Doing With Your Rejects?

first_img8 Best WordPress Hosting Solutions on the Market Tags:#start#StartUp 101 To give you some further context, we recently spoke with a VC in Boise, Idaho, who gets 500 deals a year. His firm invests in four. That means that less than 1% of the entrepreneurs who apply succeed in getting financed. If you look at the numbers of super angels in Silicon Valley, they are even scarier. Mike Maples told us that he gets 7,000 deals a year and invests in 12 to 15. That’s a 0.21% hit rate. The flip side: a 99.79% rejection rate.Friends in the investment ecosystem, this is the most obvious opportunity for us to address through 1M/1M and make a dent in infant entrepreneur mortality. (more…)I’d like to hear from venture capitalists, angel investors, incubators, and accelerators on this topic. I have a fundamental observation to make here that seems to be lost in the noisy universe of entrepreneurs’ obsession with fund-raising: Most companies should not raise external financing. They should be built organically, bootstrapped, and get to sustainability. A sustainable business = (customer + revenue + profits). Investors are optional in this equation. Very few businesses address large enough market opportunities to warrant professional investor involvement, especially VCs. But many can become sustainable businesses that can make their owners tremendously wealthy.With that preamble, let’s jump into the presentations for this week’s One Million by One Million roundtable. Very encouragingly, we had three businesses, each addressing an interesting business opportunity, and my personal experience resonated with all three.Learn It LiveFirst, Sam Slover discussed Learn It Live, a marketplace for experts teaching certain subjects through a distance learning mode. I have seen several businesses along these lines, but what I liked about Sam’s is that he has started working with professional IT organizations where experts naturally gravitate and empowering these existing communities to better leverage their expertise.Sam had other ideas about healthcare and such, but I asked him to focus the business squarely on IT experts and build up the community by working with professional organizations, as he has already started to do.BizequeNext, Taariq Lewis presented Bizeque, a business analytics company, with the observation that the C-suite at different companies is still unable to access critical business metrics (e.g., Who are my most profitable customers?) because they are dependent on database administrators (DBAs) to set up queries. Taariq wants Bizeque to free C-Suite and other top executives to be able to freely query such questions and act as a translation bridge between them and the DBA or business analysis teams.Business analytics has, of course, been around for a couple of decades, and there are numerous vendors in the market. I advised Taariq to focus on just one analytics product and become a value-added service provider for that particular vendor. Taariq can use the relationship to better understand the situations of various real customers and have the vendor partner bring him into, let’s say, a dozen customer situations.Perhaps, to begin with, Taariq uses his software to offer the solution as a service project and charges for building a certain set of analytics queries to address key performance indicators.This would do two things: contain the complexity of the systems Taariq has to work with right out of the gate, and help him go to market through the sales and marketing team of the analytics software vendors providing the core engine. It would go a long way in validating his assumptions and possibly also bring in customer revenues if the value proposition really resonates.CricketWeeklyFinally, Adarsh Jain from Delhi pitched CricketWeekly. Adarsh has a good insight that cricket enthusiasts, of whom there are millions in India, do not have access to quality cricket merchandise at affordable prices, and he has launched a site to do crowdsourced designs around the cricket theme to produce and market T-shirts and similar products. It’s a spin on Zazzle and Shutterfly types of concepts, and I think it has solid potential for the Indian market. I know because I grew up as a cricket enthusiast and have firsthand knowledge of the fever it creates among Indian youth. I can easily see them creating T-shirt designs and such on Adarsh’s site. (I advised him to change the name, though.)Our primary discussion was about the company’s customer acquisition, and I suggested using events at various college and high school campuses to build up buzz.In summary, all three of today’s entrepreneurs presented real opportunities. Now it’s going to be a matter of fine-tuning, sculpting the businesses day by day, and executing precisely, accurately, and without losing focus. I am a great fan of precision, and with some of the strategy tightening we did at the roundtable today, these businesses definitely have a shot at such focused execution.You can listen to the recording of today’s roundtable here. Recordings of previous roundtables are all available here. You can register for the next roundtable here.Sramana Mitra is the founder of the One Million by One Million (1M/1M) initiative, an educational, business development and incubation program that aims to help one million entrepreneurs globally to reach $1 million in revenue and beyond. She is a Silicon Valley entrepreneur and strategy consultant, writes the blog Sramana Mitra On Strategy, is author of the Entrepreneur Journeys book series and Vision India 2020. She has a master’s degree in electrical engineering and computer science from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. Top Reasons to Go With Managed WordPress Hosting I recently wrote a blog post that I believe is worth pointing out in the context of the strategy roundtables: VCs, Angels, Incubators, Accelerators – What Are You Doing With Your Rejects? It makes the following observation: sramana mitracenter_img When I first talked about the 1M/1M program, I had observed the need to contain the immense infant entrepreneur mortality prevalent in the startup ecosystem. Over the past year, we have been talking to various investors – VCs and angels, and incubators and accelerators – asking them the question: What are you doing with your rejects? Why Tech Companies Need Simpler Terms of Servic… Related Posts A Web Developer’s New Best Friend is the AI Wai…last_img read more

14 Reasons Donor Management Will Save You This Year

first_imgStill tracking your donors through five different versions of Excel spreadsheets, endless email chains, and Post-It notes? Let’s be real:  you need a better way to manage your individual donors.A donor management system will save you time and will help you be a smarter fundraiser. Not sure how this works? Here are the top 14 ways a donor management system will help you this year:Raise more money by targeting donors. Smart donor management allows you to easily create dynamic lists and develop targeted campaigns to donors based on giving history, average gift amount, and more.Eliminate repetitive, manual, and time-consuming tasks by automating standard processes and workflows. Free up your staff to focus on building relationships instead of administrative tasks.Track campaign results in real time. Spend less time (and money) on tracking results from your campaigns and more time planning your next one.Remove the need to sift through multiple spreadsheets and applications to find donor data. Once you move to a donor management system, it’s all in one place and accessible online so you can look up information anywhere.Know how you are progressing towards your December goals. Online fundraising data flows into your donor database to automatically update charts and reports giving you a clearer picture of how close you are to achieving your fundraising goals.Understand your donors and their behaviors. Storing detailed information like donation, volunteer, event attendance, demographics, and participation information will help you better understand what you donors want from your organization (and what they don’t want).Share information between staff and volunteers. A donor database will help you avoid confusion and have everyone operating off the same information. No more searching through an inbox to find the latest version, it’s all stored in one place and updated in real time.Check donor information on the go. Take your filing cabinet with you by having mobile access to view and enter notes right after you make a donor visit.Retain your year-end donors and build stronger relationships. A great donor management system will send automatic thank you emails for donations and reminder emails for pledges that are yet to be fulfilled.Get the most from all your tools with seamless integration. Connect email marketing, donation forms, and peer-to-peer fundraising campaigns so every bit of data is stored in one place.Keep donor relationships strong even when staff turnover happens. Notes are stored in a donor record so when a new staff member starts, all communication history is at their fingertips.Allow staff and volunteers to see only what they need to see. Control access to constituent information by setting permissions to records and data fields.Track incoming funds and pledges. View progress in a dashboard format that is board meeting ready.Remove the need for IT resources to hold your hand every step of the way. A good donor management system should be easy to set up and maintain by development staff. You shouldn’t have to wait on IT support to do your job.With the right donor management, smarter fundraising tools, and a solid campaign plan, you’ll be all set to raise more this year—and for years to come.last_img read more

A New Look for Network for Good

first_imgThis is a blog post I’ve been looking forward to writing for some time now.Today I’m pleased to share the launch of our redesigned Network for Good website featuring a fresh new look that highlights our best resources and pulls them into one central location. You can now visit www.networkforgood.com to access (and search) all of our content, including our webinars, guides and templates, The Nonprofit Marketing Blog, and Fundraising 123 articles. You can also find updated information on Network for Good’s fundraising products and services and learn how to improve your strategy for connecting with individual donors.A big thanks to the amazing team here at Network for Good, who imagined, designed, built, and launched the site in record time. Our appreciation also goes out to our many advisors and testers (including our customers, partners, readers, and sector experts) who helped us refine our approach over the last several weeks.We’re excited about our new site, and we hope you find it easier to navigate and more useful than ever. I’d love to hear what you think—drop me a line and let me know your questions and feedback.last_img read more

Join the MHTF and the Wilson Center September 23 to Launch: “Delivering Success: Scaling Up Solutions for Maternal Health”

first_img ShareEmailPrint To learn more, read: Posted on September 16, 2013February 2, 2017By: Sarah Blake, MHTF consultantClick to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to email this to a friend (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window)Next Monday, September 23, the MHTF will join the Wilson Center in launching a new report, Delivering Success: Scaling Up Solutions for Maternal Health, which draws on the experiences of the Advancing Policy Dialogue in Maternal Health series. The launch event will be held from 3:00-5:00 pm (EDT) at the Wilson Center, in Washington, DC, and will feature speakers from the MHTF and several of our partners and colleagues, including UNFPA and the Public Health Foundation of India.From the event announcement:Since 2009, the Wilson Center’s Advancing Dialogue on Maternal Health series, one of the few forums dedicated to maternal health, has brought together experts, donors, and policymakers from around the world to leverage their collective knowledge and move forward on reducing pregnancy-related deaths and complications. As part of the 2012-2013 series, the Wilson Center and the Population Foundation of India convened a workshop on neglected maternal health issues which brought together participants in New Delhi with audiences at the Wilson Center and the Harvard School of Public Health. Join us as we launch Delivering Success: Scaling Up Solutions for Maternal Health, a new report which captures, analyzes, and synthesizes the strategies and recommendations that emerged from the series. Delivering Success consolidates key findings and ties them to discussions taking place in global forums.If you are interested in attending the event in person, visit the Wilson Center for more details, or RSVP here. To join the discussion on Twitter, use the hashtag #MHDialogue.Share this:last_img read more

Overcoming Obstacles to Sustainable Funding: What Nonprofits Need to Thrive

first_imgHow do you fund your mission?A healthy nonprofit has multiple sources of funding, including individual giving. Depending entirely on grants or public funding is risky, as either could be lost without any control on the part of the nonprofit. A robust fundraising program provides needed financial security, expands your community, and grows awareness for your cause.How do you make sure your fundraising is successful? The best way to get started is to sit down and create a plan.The Number One Indicator of Fundraising SuccessAccording to the Individual Donor Benchmark Report, which studies nonprofits with operating budgets under $2 million, the number one indicator of success is having a written fundraising plan.Nonprofits with a fundraising plan—even if they don’t end up using it—are more likely to be successful. Why? The act of planning—going through last year’s numbers, analyzing results, assessing your financial health and looking for growth areas—gives you a healthy foundation to grow your programs. It keeps you focused, helps you think critically about new fundraising ideas, and ensures your activities support your mission.Want more planning resources? Check out 8 Resources to Help with Fundraising Planning.We know that fundraising planning is important. So, are nonprofits listening?Network for Good recently surveyed 10,000 small to mid-sized nonprofits to learn more about how they depend on fundraising plans, and the results were fascinating, to say the least.Q1: Do you currently have a written, 12-month fundraising plan from which you are managing revenue-generating activities to balance your budget?On the surface, it seems like many nonprofits are already using fundraising plans. But what about those ones who aren’t?Q2: If you don’t have a fundraising plan, what is the leading factor that is hindering your ability to create and implement one?A lack of time is the leading factor preventing nonprofit managers from developing a written fundraising plan, followed by a lack of insights and strategic know-how.Of course, it takes more than just a fundraising plan to ensure success—the plan is just the beginning. Successful fundraising is predicated upon multiple factors: a written plan, an effective strategy and case for support, staff and board consistently implementing tasks, and technology to track and build donor relationships.Unfortunately that’s often a tall order in a small shop. Often understaffed and underfunded, how does a small nonprofit afford the time and strategic help needed to develop a plan and sustain their mission?A New Model for SuccessNetwork for Good has initiated a new strategy to help smaller nonprofits move to more diversified and sustainable fundraising. We have coupled access to a personal fundraising coach with simple, easy-to-use fundraising software to ensure small nonprofits can continue their mission and sustain funding for programs commonly dropped due to lack of funding.In particular, the software and coaching combination was designed to help small and medium-sized nonprofits accomplish everything they need to thrive, including:Engage their boards in fundraising activities.Craft compelling stories to reach donors’ minds and hearts.Plan a successful year-end fundraising campaign.Analyze data to better understand their donors and inform their plan.Sounds great, right? The question is, does this model of software and coaching really work?The short answer is YES.Participating nonprofits raised, on average, 27% more revenue without a net increase to their expenses.What’s a Personal Fundraising Coach?So, you may be familiar with Network for Good’s software: donor management (designed just for small nonprofits) and fully integrated campaign pages. But what about the personal fundraising coach?Participating nonprofits are matched with a fundraising expert who has experience within their cause area and whose expertise matches their unique needs and challenges. Organizations get the help they need when they need it, without the risk of hiring a full time fundraising professional.These individuals provide one-on-one strategic support in everything ranging from creating a 12-month fundraising plan to developing a successful event to crafting an effective appeal. Whatever individual challenges a nonprofit is currently facing, the coach is there to provide strategic guidance.Looking ForwardIn recent years, many small nonprofits have struggled to find ways to create a model for survival, let alone growth. Diversified funding, affordable yet effective tools, and the help of a personal fundraising coach have helped hundreds of nonprofits in the last year to build a more certain and sustainable future.Click here to talk to us. We’ll give you an overview of the software, strategy, and coaching that can help your organization thrive.last_img read more

NFG Staff Profile: Lenny Wrigley

first_imgFrom an internship at an LGBTQ nonprofit to his time on staff at an animal rescue organization, and now with Network for Good, Lenny Wrigley has lived the day-to-day of nonprofits for the past six years. In his role as customer success specialist, Lenny serves as a guide for many nonprofits as they join the Network for Good family.“Nonprofits are what makes the world go ‘round. They’re how we get change in the world. There are a lot of people who are scared of change, even in nonprofits, but change is a good thing. That’s what nonprofits are trying to accomplish. At Network for Good, I get to be part of that process of change with a wide range of nonprofits, from animal rights to religious rights to gender identity and sexual orientation rights. It’s a full spectrum. It feels good to help. Change and challenge is what we need in the world.”Q&A with Lenny Wrigley, Customer Success SpecialistWhat do you do at Network for Good?I work with nonprofits during their first 90 days with Network for Good, getting them up and running smoothly in the system and teaching them the tools and best practices.I currently work with about 100 nonprofits. I love directing and coaching them and seeing their growth. I enjoy sharing different issues other nonprofits have had and how to get ahead of the problem with our software. I’m a very proactive person, so I like teaching them how to avoid certain habits.What is your experience with nonprofit organizations?I interned for a semester with the Family Equality Council on their communications team, helping with their website, writing blog posts, and contacting their members to participate in different articles and activities.After that, I worked at the Humane Rescue Alliance, interviewing people who needed to surrender their dogs, discussing their different options, and providing resources. With a job like that—when you’re dealing with the life and death of an animal—when it’s rewarding, it can bring you to tears. At the same time, when it’s not rewarding it has the exact same result. I have a lot of respect for anyone who works at a rescue organization.What is your favorite thing to do when you’re not at work?I’m in school right now, studying behavioral science and religion, and then I start seminary school in June, so that keeps me very busy. I love to read books. I recently read UnClobber: Rethinking Our Misuse of the Bible on Homosexuality, which looks at the different scriptures that have been used against the LGBTQ community and how they’ve been taken so out of context that they’re not the same scriptures that they were thousands of years ago.I’m also a fan of hopelessly romantic stories like Me Before You and Nicholas Sparks’ books; self-help and positive psychology books; and the Harry Potter series. This past Christmas I read Becoming by Michelle Obama. I love to be in a library or book store and just read books all day and not have to worry about anything else. I wasn’t like that as a kid. I wouldn’t pick up a book as a kid.Lightning RoundDream vacation? IsraelMost recent book read? Torn by Justin LeeLast movie seen in movie theater? The Best of EnemiesYour theme song? Anything by Taylor Swift!Favorite color? PurpleRead more on The Nonprofit Bloglast_img read more

The Long History of Poverty and Health: Promoting Equity in the Fight for Improved Maternal and Child Survival

first_img ShareEmailPrint To learn more, read: Posted on October 14, 2015October 13, 2016By: Julianne Weis, Maternal Health ConsultantClick to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to email this to a friend (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window)Sustainable Development Goal 10, to reduce inequality within and among countries, stands out as one of the most pressing and challenging obstacles of our generation. Since the Alma Ata Declaration was signed in 1978, countries have struggled to provide primary health care in an equitable manner. Communities in poverty are consistently excluded from national and global health programming, and we cannot discuss an improvement in maternal and child health without dealing squarely with the problem of inequity.Dr. Ulla Larsson in Ethiopia saw this problem head-on when she led a mobile maternal and child health clinic in Addis Ababa. The clinic focused on low-income communities and provided vaccinations for children, basic ante-natal consultation and health education programming in the form of lectures on adequate sanitation and nutrition practices. As part of the public health programming, the organization handed out free powdered milk supplies from UNICEF to mothers to supplement their children’s diets. The mobile clinic was well attended, until the powdered milk supplies ran out. Suddenly, mothers stopped coming to the lectures.Why did women stop attending a health clinic when they no longer received milk supplements? The answer is simple: poverty. Dr. Larsson lamented that the educational mission of her mobile clinic failed, but how were her patients expected to appropriate the lessons of the health curriculum without a change in their means or livelihood? Women could not afford to give their children more nutritious food, especially without the handout of milk. So there was little purpose in attending a lecture on improving child nutrition when they had no means to do so.The story of Dr. Larsson’s clinic is actually very old: the clinic operated in Addis in the late 1960s, but the impact of poverty on maternal health choices has remained a persistent problem. Too often, RMNCH programming, especially information and sensitization campaigns, neglect the impact of livelihood constraints on women’s health seeking behaviors.Dr. Asfaw Desta, a 50-year veteran of public health education and policy planning in Ethiopia, has learned this lesson time and again in his decades of experience in public service. He explained to me that as public health educators, while “we tell people to use soap to wash and be cleaner, and nutritional advice to eat better, they used to say: ‘We know that, give us the means and we can provide ourselves with the soap and nutritional foods you’re talking about.’ The means. It was very challenging to hear people say that. When you tell them about what to do – they know what to do, but they don’t have the means.”Moving forward into the next phase of post-MDG programming, we must learn from the past, and avoid the repeated mistakes of expecting health policies to operate the same across different economic classes. The promotion of equity through poverty reduction (SDG #1) is paramount in the fight for improved maternal health. Further, if we are going to reduce the global maternal mortality ratio to less than 70 per 100,000 live births by 2030 (SDG #3.1), there is a need to target programming to the poorest women who are traditionally excluded from health services. At the upcoming Global Maternal Newborn Health Conference, discussions must focus on the poorest women, and their unique financial and non-financial barriers to accessing maternal health services. We cannot expect mothers to radically improve their health and nutrition status without providing them the means to do so.Photo: “Ethiopia 3” © 2012 Swathi Sridharan/ICRISAT, used under a Creative Commons Attribution license: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0/Share this:last_img read more

Markets Right Now Stocks open lower on Wall Street

first_imgNEW YORK — The latest on developments in financial markets (all times local):9:35 a.m.Stocks are opening lower on Wall Street, led by losses in technology companies and banks.Apple lost 1.7 per cent early Tuesday and Bank of America was down 1.3 per cent.Dollar General sank 5.6 per cent after reporting weak results.The S&P 500 index lost 8 points, or 0.3 per cent, to 2,782.The Dow Jones Industrial Average fell 65 points, or 0.3 per cent, to 25,761. The Nasdaq composite gave up 33 points, or 0.5 per cent, to 7,407.Bond prices rose. The yield on the 10-year Treasury fell to 2.95 per cent.The Associated Presslast_img read more

In era of news deserts no easy fix for local news struggles

first_imgNEW YORK — The local news industry hasn’t been the subject of much good news itself lately.Newspaper circulation is down sharply, and so is employment in the newspaper industry. Financial cutbacks have led to the shutdown of nearly 1,800 daily and weekly newspapers since 2004, and given rise to new terminology to describe what’s left in their wake. “News deserts” describes parts of the country no longer covered by daily journalists, while “ghost newspapers” is a term for publications with much more limited circulation and ambition.Facebook’s $300 million donation Tuesday to fund local news initiatives helped put the problem in focus. So did the ownership bid for the Gannett company, publisher of USA Today and several daily newspapers, by a company known for making sharp financial cutbacks.David Bauder, The Associated Presslast_img read more