Legendary opener Desmond Haynes frustrated by CWI rejection

first_imgWINDIES legend Desmond Haynes has accused Cricket West Indies (CWI) of turning a cold shoulder to his aspirations of joining the regional cricket team’s coaching staff.Haynes, once part of the most successful opening duo in West Indies cricket history, has expressed an interest in serving the regional team in the capacity of coach for the last couple of years.Despite receiving ringing endorsements from several former legends, Haynes was first overlooked under the Dave Cameron administration when Cricket West Indies (CWI) appointed Richard Pybus.Under the new Ricky Skerritt-led association, which later pledged to use regional talent to fill vacancies, he was again overlooked as Floyd Reifer was named interim coach heading into the ICC World Cup.“I sent in an application and the CEO said he’d pass it onto Jimmy Adams (West Indies’ director of cricket). So nothing’s happening. It’s that lack of respect – I think I deserve a reply just saying, ‘Desmond, we’re working on it’,” he added.“It got to a stage where I sent an application in February and they name an interim coach in Reifer; they’re preparing for the World Cup and they get (Ramnaresh) Sarwan to help with the batting. They’re obviously sending a message that they definitely don’t want me around West Indies cricket.” (Sportsmax)last_img read more

UW readies for matchup with Michigan

first_imgMATTHEW KUTZ/Herald photoFor the first time since 2001, Wisconsin (3-0) hosts No. 14 Michigan (2-1) under the lights at Camp Randall Saturday.The numbers are not on Wisconsin’s side in this series. Michigan leads the all-time series 47-10-1 and owns a 23-3-1 record against the Badgers in Madison. To further complicate things for Wisconsin, Michigan has won its last 24 Big Ten road openers. The last time Wisconsin was able to chalk up a win against the Wolverines was in 1994, when they beat Michigan 31-19 in Ann Arbor.In its 100th season in the Big Ten, Michigan has remained the conference’s premier team, with 42 conference titles — including three this decade. While head coach Barry Alvarez respects the Michigan tradition, he isn’t intimidated by it.”I think it’s a simple fact that [Michigan] is pretty good,” Alvarez said. “They always have been. I think if you take a look at every other team in the [Big Ten], there has been some slippage where they have slipped and they have down years. I can’t remember a year where Michigan has been down. Their down years are pretty good years.”Coming off a heartbreaking 17-10 home loss to the re-energized Fighting Irish, Michigan exploded for 435 total yards and seven touchdowns against Eastern Michigan last Saturday. Michigan looks to carry the momentum from the Eastern Michigan contest into its first road game of the year, having struggled in recent years in their opening road game, losing five straight.”As a team, we don’t look at things the same way that the media will look at things,” Michigan wideout Carl Tabb said in a team press conference. “I’m not going to sit and say that we’ve lost our last five openers, we need to do something special in this one. You have to approach every game the same … if anything, it’s going to make me want to win even more. It’s going to make the team work that much harder to turn that stat around.”Michigan is lead by sophomore quarterback Chad Henne. In his true freshman season at Michigan, Henne led the Wolverines to a Big Ten title en route to a Rose Bowl berth. However, the true standout player this season for Michigan has been senior captain Jason Avant.With the departure of Braylon Edwards to the NFL, Avant has become Henne’s go-to guy at wideout. In three games this season, Avant leads the Big Ten in catches (22) and receiving yards (310) while snaring three touchdowns.Michigan’s ground attack will prove to be a large challenge for Wisconsin’s depleted defensive front. The Wolverines sport three running backs — Kevin Grady, Max Martin and Mike Hart — all of whom are more than capable of carrying the workload. In three games this season, the trio has combined for over 400 yards and four touchdowns.The key to the game for both teams could come in the trenches. Wisconsin’s defense enters the contest boasting the No. 4 rush defense in the nation, allowing a paltry 39.7 yards per game.Conversely, Michigan hopes to contain Junior Brian Calhoun with a punishing run defense of its own. Over Michigan’s last three games, the Wolverines have allowed an average of only 110 yards per game on the ground and just two rushing touchdowns.The hype surrounding Saturday’s kickoff promises an energized atmosphere at Camp Randall, as these two Big Ten rivals always play each other tough, despite the disparity in the all-time series. The last four meetings have been decided by a total of only 18 points (4.5 ppg).”It’s a big game,” Alvarez said. “It will be two rated teams playing, [which] is one of the goals that we set going into the season. We wanted to make this a big game. We should have a great atmosphere. My main concern [is] that we prepare well and play well.”last_img read more

Women of Troy look to continue undefeated streak

first_imgWith a perfect 6-0 record to start the season, the No. 3-ranked USC women’s water polo team looks to continue its hot start this weekend when it heads out to Riverside for the Lancer Invitational.To kick off the tournament hosted by Cal Baptist University, USC will play against the host Lancers at 4 p.m. on Friday. The game against the Lancers (2-6) will be a rematch of their meeting at the UCLA Invite on Jan. 17, which USC won by a score of 24-3. The Women of Troy jumped out to a 20-1 lead in the third period and never looked back. Eleven different players scored, led by senior Monica Vavic’s six goals.Immediately following their match against Cal Baptist, the Women of Troy will take on the University of Redlands at 5:15 p.m. The Bulldogs    (0-3) last played against USC in this same tournament last year. The Women of Troy were victorious with a 24-1 win against the Division III school. Seniors Eike Daube and Jennifer Stiefel both scored three goals to lead the Trojans to victory, while sophomores Ioanna Haralabidis and Stephania Haralabidis each scored twice.On Saturday, Feb. 14, USC will play against Pomona-Pitzer (2-2) in an 11:30 a.m. match. The last time these two teams met was at Harvard University for the 2013 NCAA Championship quarterfinals, where USC thrashed Pomona-Pitzer by a score of 27-1. USC eventually went on to win the national championship that year in a thrilling sudden-death win over Stanford.Finally, the Women of Troy will face Occidental College (0-2) at   2 p.m. to end the tournament. In what will be just their third match of the season, the Division III Tigers will look to put up a fight against USC, one of the nation’s best teams.Though the competition may not be at the level USC will face in the Mountain Pacific Sports Federation, head coach Jovan Vavic and the Women of Troy will look to ride the momentum of last weekend’s successful showing at the Triton Invitational. In fact, two young Trojan players were rewarded for their contributions, with Stephania Haralabidis being named MPSF Player of the Week for the first time in her career, while freshman goalie Victória Chamorro racked up the first award in her young career as MPSF Newcomer of the Week. Stephania Haralabidis led the Women of Troy offensively in La Jolla last weekend, scoring 14 goals to lead USC to four big wins. Chamorro provided a steady force in the cage for USC at the Triton Invitational, racking up a career-high 15 saves in the championship game against No. 6-ranked UC Irvine. Overall, Chamorro finished with a total of 27 saves in just 13 periods of work, while allowing only 11 goals during the tournament.After the first six games of 2015, USC leads the MPSF in offense and defense, as the Women of Troy are outscoring their opponents by a lofty 123-21 margin. Vavic is USC’s leading scorer with 28 goals this season, while Stephania Haralabidis is second on the team with 22 goals, followed by twin sister Ioanna Haralabidis with 15. Defensively, Chamorro averages 7.2 saves per game and just 3.4 goals-against per game.Furthermore, it could be a big weekend for Vavic, who will look to climb the ladder in USC’s record books. After a big scoring output to start the season, Vavic leaped up to No. 3 all-time in career scoring at USC with 219 career goals. With only five goals needed to reach No. 2 all-time, Vavic will almost certainly pass former Olympian Sofia Konoukh (224 career goals) this weekend.last_img read more

Heat Burn Spurs, Tie Series 1-1

first_imgSAN ANTONIO — No cramps, no problems for LeBron James.And with their superstar making it to the finish this time, the Miami Heat bounced back from a loss, just as they always do in the playoffs.“Obviously, having No. 6 in the game at the end was a plus for us,” Dwyane Wade said.James had 35 points and 10 rebounds in a powerful comeback from the cramps that knocked him out of the opener, as the Heat tied the NBA Finals with a 98-96 victory over the San Antonio Spurs in Game 2 the night of June 8.Chris Bosh made the go-ahead 3-pointer on a pass from James with 1:18 remaining for the Heat, who have won 13 straight following a loss in the postseason. Just like last year, they rebounded after losing Game 1 to the Spurs.Bosh had 18 points for the Heat, who are headed home for Game 3 on June 10. James played more than 37 minutes, making 14 of 22 shots. He was 1 for 4 with three turnovers in a shaky first quarter, then made 11 of his next 13.After two days of enduring criticism for not finishing the game and getting suggestions on how to avoid cramps, James changed the subject.“What happened on Thursday was Thursday,” James said. “My whole focus was how I was going to try to help this team even this up and just try to make some plays.” He had a key strip of Tony Parker down the stretch, playing a dominant game on both ends as if he had something to prove.As usual, James found a way to silence his haters.He had 11 points in the second quarter, helping Miami erase an 11-point deficit early in the period. The game was played within a margin of a few points from there, and the Spurs missed a chance to seize control in the fourth quarter when Parker and Tim Duncan missed four straight free throws when they had a two-point lead.James then made a 3-pointer and two free throws to put Miami in position to win. Parker scored 21 points and Duncan had 18 points and 15 rebounds for the Spurs, who had won eight straight at home by at least 15 points.“Down the end there they executed really well,” Duncan said. “LeBron made some great passes and guys made open shots. We had the same result in the first game. They kind of flipped it in this one.”The game was played in comfortable conditions inside the AT&T Center, where an air conditioning failure in Game 1 sent temperatures soaring to about 90 degrees. The broken circuit breaker was fixed by June 6, and it was much cooler inside the arena.James had the toughest time with the heat on June 5, needing treatment midway through the fourth quarter before eventually having to leave for good. He had plenty of time to recover, with the two days off between Games 1 and 2.He changed only a little of his routine, taking an 8 a.m. yoga class on June 8 and switching to a shorter pair of tights. He personally erased a 62-56 San Antonio lead by scoring eight points in less than a minute, and his 14 points in the third quarter had Miami down only 78-77 heading to the fourth.“For me, once I get into a good groove, I feel like everything is going to go in,” James said. For a time, everything did. Then he switched to being a passer at the end, finding Bosh in the corner for the shot that made it 95-93.Wade and Rashard Lewis each scored 14 points for the Heat, who also dropped Game 1 of the NBA Finals against Oklahoma City two years ago. They have won five straight series after dropping the opening game.The Spurs were in good position, withstanding James’ assault long enough to lead by one with under 2 minutes to play. But they were shut out from there until Manu Ginobili’s 3-pointer as time expired.“LeBron with the ball did a pretty good job at his end and we had to be really perfect at the other end and we didn’t,” Spurs coach Gregg Popovich said. “We didn’t take advantage of things. We made bad decisions.”And it didn’t help them that they had to deal with James at the end of this one. Ginobili finished with 19 points for the Spurs, whose 18 points in the fourth quarter were half the 36 they scored in the opener.“We have a very competitive group and you have two days to commiserate how that game went down,” Heat coach Erik Spoelstra said. “It was frustrating, painful going through that for two days and now we have to manage the other emotion.”After their sensational finish to Game 1, the Spurs picked up right where they left off, making 10 of their first 15 shots. They opened an 11-point lead early in the second before James got going. He had three straight Miami baskets, and a follow shot later in the period gave the Heat their first lead at 34-33.(BRIAN MAHONEY, AP Basketball Writer)TweetPinShare0 Shareslast_img read more

Frazier Wins Home Run Derby

first_imgCINCINNATI — “The Toddfather” has a new title. Todd Frazier — Little League World Series star, Frank Sinatra aficionado — is baseball’s new King of Swing.The Jersey boy who never seems to get rattled waited until his very last swing — three times, no less — to win the All-Star Home Run Derby in his home ballpark on July 13.Pressure? Sure didn’t show it.The Reds third baseman became only the second player to win the long-ball competition on his home field, topping Dodgers rookie Joc Pederson 15-14 with another late surge and one last perfectly timed swing.“No pressure here with these fans,” he said, after accepting the crossed-bats trophy to one more standing ovation at Great American Ball Park.Frazier joined the Cubs’ Ryne Sandberg for home-field homer titles — the Hall of Fame second baseman did it at Wrigley Field in 1990. After finishing second last year in Minneapolis, this one was as sweet as that winning swing.“That pushed me a lot,” Frazier said. “I wanted to get back here. I’d been working in the offseason a little bit. I’m just glad it was in Cincinnati and they could enjoy it with me.”Pederson was trying to become the first rookie since Wally Joyner in 1986 to win or share the title. He reached the final round by knocking off Albert Pujols, who provided a blast after making the All-Star team for the first time in five years.“I’m happy for Todd, especially being able to do it in front of his fans,” Pujols said. “It’s his night. He deserves it. I just hope the fans were pleased and happy with the performance every single guy did. The right guy won, too.”Frazier topped Prince Fielder and Josh Donaldson to reach the finals, where he faced his biggest test. Pederson went first and matched the highest total of the night with 14 homers. Frazier needed a late surge to pull even, tying him with 11 seconds left in his round.He’d hit enough long homers to earn an extra 30 seconds, giving him a chance to take a few deep breaths, regroup and refocus.On the first pitch from brother Charlie in extra time, Frazier puffed his cheeks and exhaled as he hit one solidly, then mouthed the words “That’s gone” as the ball headed for the left field stands. The ballpark was full of fans with arms raised even before the ball landed.How’s that?“It was a great environment,” Pederson said. “It was extremely humbling being out there with Prince Fielder, Albert Pujols and Josh Donaldson.”And, of course, it ended with a little more Sinatra.Frazier uses Fly Me To The Moon as his music when he walks to the batter’s box during games, and it greeted each of his rounds on July 13. When he’d clinched the title, the ballpark rocked with I Did It My Way.“I had no clue they were going to do that,” Frazier said. “That was pretty nice.”With that, Frazier made it an All-Cincinnati All-Star event so far. Cubs catcher Kyle Schwarber, a Reds fan who grew up in nearby Middletown, Ohio, was the MVP of the Futures Game on July 12 with a two-run triple.Frazier had been gearing up for the derby all season. He faded badly last year in Minneapolis, reaching the finals before losing to Yoenis Cespedes 9-1. He was so worn out that he could barely hit one at the end, and he planned to pace himself better this time.He hung in there and added to his lore for big home runs.Frazier was a member of the 1998 Toms River team in New Jersey that beat Japan for the Little League World Series championship. He had a homer among his four hits in the clinching game.He loves hitting at Great American Ball Park, which has been one of the majors’ most homer-friendly places since it opened in 2003. He ranks among the major league leaders with 25 home runs this season.There was speculation that one of the All-Stars might knock one into the Ohio River beyond right field — Adam Dunn is the only one to reach it so far.No splashdowns. Plenty of drama, though.Frazier had a tough challenge right away. Fielder was trying to join Ken Griffey Jr. as the only three-time derby champions. Junior watched from foul territory after throwing a ceremonial opening pitch to his father, Ken Sr.And Fielder wowed ’em, hitting 13 homers — eight of them farther than 425 feet, with one estimated at 474 feet.The home crowd groaned collectively as Frazier came to bat and got off to a very slow start. He called timeout to catch his breath after struggling to hit his first five homers.He caught up with five seconds to go in his allotted time, then connected again on his first swing of extra time to move on. And there was no stopping him.___JOE KAY, AP Sports WriterTweetPinShare0 Shareslast_img read more

Snitch Movie Promotion

first_imgThanks to our friends at STUDIOCANAL, Touch Football Australia has 10 double passes to the new Dwayne Johnson movie ‘Snitch’, only at the movies from May 16.In the fast-paced action thriller, Snitch, Dwayne Johnson stars as a father whose teenage son is wrongly accused of a drug distribution crime and is looking at a mandatory minimum prison sentence of 10 years. Desperate and determined to rescue his son at all costs, he makes a deal with the U.S. attorney to work as an undercover informant and infiltrate a drug cartel on a dangerous mission — risking everything, including his family and his own life. For your chance to win a double pass to Snitch, send an email to media@austouch.com.au telling us why you’d like to win tickets to this film. The best 10 answers will receive a double pass and TFA will be in contact with you if you are a winner. Related LinksMovie Promotionlast_img read more

Join the Live Webcast for Putting Mothers and Babies First

first_imgPosted on February 18, 2015August 10, 2016Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to email this to a friend (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window)Thursday, February 26, 2015, 12:30-1:30pm ESTThe Leadership Studio, 10th Floor Kresge Building, 677 Huntington Ave., BostonJoin us with The Forum at the Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health for Putting Mothers and Babies First: Benefits across a lifetime – a panel discussion presented in collaboration with The GroundTruth Project and GlobalPost.One of the smartest investments a society can make is to foster the health and education of its mothers. Healthy mothers raise healthier children, which boosts the productivity and stability of communities and economies. Yet, maternal mortality remains a terrible and disproportionate reality, particularly in developing countries, where 99 percent of all maternal deaths occur. These deaths put the lives of infants and older children at risk. Traditional approaches address the needs of mothers and children separately, but growing efforts are breaking down those silos — embracing the continuum of mother and child health in the hopes of providing more effective care and resources. The hoped-for result? Health benefits to mothers, children and their families across their lifetimes.This Forum event will explore how to achieve those benefits, including providing basic care such as vaccinations, and how societies stand to thrive as a result. The panel will be moderated by Marissa Miley, Deputy Editor of Global Health for The GroundTruth Project, and includes the following experts:Ana Langer: Professor of the Practice of Public Health and Director of the Women and Health Initiative and Maternal Health Task Force, Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public HealthAlicia Yamin: Director, Program on Health Rights of Women and Children, François-Xavier Bagnoud Center for Health and Human Rights, Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public HealthJoy Riggs-Perla: Director, Saving Newborn Lives, Save the ChildrenKirsten Gagnaire: Executive Director of the Mobile Alliance for Maternal ActionTune in for the live webcast by visiting the The Forum event page. Also follow and join the conversation by using #mothersbabiesfirst and following @ForumHSPH and @MHTF on Twitter.E-mail questions for the expert participants any time before or during the live webcast to theforum@hsph.harvard.edu, the Community Discussion page, or Tweet them to @ForumHSPH using #mothersbabiesfirst.Share this: ShareEmailPrint To learn more, read:last_img read more

NFG Staff Profile: AJ Johnson

first_imgThe idea of being able to help someone attracts AJ to nonprofits. From an early age, she was involved with a Golden Retriever rescue organization and co-founded a satellite rescue facility. Working remote in Florida, you’ll find AJ at one of the awesome parks in Orlando, FL on her days off!“Nothing brings a smile to my face more than when I watch our customers have that “a-ha” moment in real time.”Q&A with AJ Johnson, Customer Success ManagerWhat do you do at Network for Good?I currently work as a Customer Success Specialist on the Welcome Team! I like to tell my customers that I’m a little bit like a driving instructor – I’m here to help them understand not only their product, but how the different components work together to help boost their fundraising. I get to work with folks for their first few months so that they’ll have a point of contact for their questions, and make sure I can provide them with the resources they’ll need to be successful after my time working with them ends.What is your experience with nonprofit organizations outside of Network for Good?I’ve always been involved with the nonprofit world one way or another. When I first heard about the 9/11 attacks, I immediately asked my parents how we’d be able to help the families who’d lost a loved one. After my family adopted a golden retriever from a small rescue while I was in middle school, we became involved enough to co-found our own rescue, using a network of volunteers, fosters, and transport specialists (#adoptdontshop, always!). I raised money through donations from my Bat Mitzvah for the rescue’s benefit, and I even ran their fledgling social media accounts for a while in high school! My passion has always been with the LGBTQ+ community, though, and I have volunteered with various queer organizations (and I do, to this day!). My focus has always been making sure people across the gender spectrum have access to safe, comfortable, and affordable medical care.What attracts you to nonprofits? I just love the concept of being able to do everything in your power to help someone. I’ve found motivation in helping those who maybe don’t even realize that they might need help, and I’ve found motivation in giving voices to those who maybe don’t have the capability to speak up. It’s that motivation that moves me to incorporate service in all parts of my life – work, play, and everything in between.What do you enjoy most about your work? Nothing brings a smile to my face more than when I watch our customers have that “aha!” moment when I’m on the phone with them. When everything clicks together for them, in that moment, it’s easy to see their excitement grow – they often are realizing exactly how they’ll be able to use the system to reach more donors with their message. Nonprofits are people’s passions, their hearts and souls, and being able to see it all click as they use their new system is just so fulfilling. I also love the exposure I get to nonprofits and causes that I’d never heard of – there are so many incredible people doing incredible things and it’s inspiring to see the kind of solutions people can find and the real magic they can do.What do you enjoy doing outside work? I live (and work remotely) about 30 miles south of Orlando, and I’m a huge adrenaline junkie, so on my days off, there’s a good chance you’ll find me at one of the theme parks in the area. I’ve got annual passes to Universal, Sea World, and Disney World, but I’ve always been a Disney kid at heart, so sometimes I’ll just go to the parks to grab a Mickey pretzel with cheese and people watch. Universal is great, too, for when I need a little Hogwarts magic to get through the weekend, and you’ll catch me most nights during the fall at their Halloween Horror Nights, hiding behind my partner from all of the scares! Sea World has become a recent favorite, though, because you can actually feed some of the little rays some anchovies, or watch the baby dolphins as they play tag and chase each other in the nursery. No matter which park I’m at, though, I’ll be somewhere near those roller coasters!Lightning RoundDream vacation? A full European adventure. I took Italian in high school and fell in love with the language, the culture, the architecture, the art – but if I’m headed on a dream trip, why only include one stop on the tour?Most recent book read? I’m currently reading Retta’s memoir “So Close to Being the Sh*t, Y’all Don’t Even Know” and I haven’t been able to stop laughing. She’s funny and poignant, and it goes so far beyond her time on Parks and Rec. I love to read though, and I’ve got over a thousand physical books at home – don’t even ask my about my Kindle.Last movie seen in movie theater? The last two have been Aladdin and Toy Story 4 – I wasn’t kidding about being a Disney kid!Theme song? “Don’t Threaten Me With A Good Time” by Panic! At the Disco.Favorite color? Blue!All time favorite athlete? Right now, it’s Coco Gauff – she’s an honest-to-goodness inspiration. At fifteen, she’s competing in Wimbledon against her all-time hero – at fifteen, I think I was working part-time at a water park! She sets such an example for anyone who wants to follow their dreams, as cheesy as it sounds. Read more on The Nonprofit Bloglast_img read more

The Long History of Poverty and Health: Promoting Equity in the Fight for Improved Maternal and Child Survival

first_img ShareEmailPrint To learn more, read: Posted on October 14, 2015October 13, 2016By: Julianne Weis, Maternal Health ConsultantClick to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to email this to a friend (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window)Sustainable Development Goal 10, to reduce inequality within and among countries, stands out as one of the most pressing and challenging obstacles of our generation. Since the Alma Ata Declaration was signed in 1978, countries have struggled to provide primary health care in an equitable manner. Communities in poverty are consistently excluded from national and global health programming, and we cannot discuss an improvement in maternal and child health without dealing squarely with the problem of inequity.Dr. Ulla Larsson in Ethiopia saw this problem head-on when she led a mobile maternal and child health clinic in Addis Ababa. The clinic focused on low-income communities and provided vaccinations for children, basic ante-natal consultation and health education programming in the form of lectures on adequate sanitation and nutrition practices. As part of the public health programming, the organization handed out free powdered milk supplies from UNICEF to mothers to supplement their children’s diets. The mobile clinic was well attended, until the powdered milk supplies ran out. Suddenly, mothers stopped coming to the lectures.Why did women stop attending a health clinic when they no longer received milk supplements? The answer is simple: poverty. Dr. Larsson lamented that the educational mission of her mobile clinic failed, but how were her patients expected to appropriate the lessons of the health curriculum without a change in their means or livelihood? Women could not afford to give their children more nutritious food, especially without the handout of milk. So there was little purpose in attending a lecture on improving child nutrition when they had no means to do so.The story of Dr. Larsson’s clinic is actually very old: the clinic operated in Addis in the late 1960s, but the impact of poverty on maternal health choices has remained a persistent problem. Too often, RMNCH programming, especially information and sensitization campaigns, neglect the impact of livelihood constraints on women’s health seeking behaviors.Dr. Asfaw Desta, a 50-year veteran of public health education and policy planning in Ethiopia, has learned this lesson time and again in his decades of experience in public service. He explained to me that as public health educators, while “we tell people to use soap to wash and be cleaner, and nutritional advice to eat better, they used to say: ‘We know that, give us the means and we can provide ourselves with the soap and nutritional foods you’re talking about.’ The means. It was very challenging to hear people say that. When you tell them about what to do – they know what to do, but they don’t have the means.”Moving forward into the next phase of post-MDG programming, we must learn from the past, and avoid the repeated mistakes of expecting health policies to operate the same across different economic classes. The promotion of equity through poverty reduction (SDG #1) is paramount in the fight for improved maternal health. Further, if we are going to reduce the global maternal mortality ratio to less than 70 per 100,000 live births by 2030 (SDG #3.1), there is a need to target programming to the poorest women who are traditionally excluded from health services. At the upcoming Global Maternal Newborn Health Conference, discussions must focus on the poorest women, and their unique financial and non-financial barriers to accessing maternal health services. We cannot expect mothers to radically improve their health and nutrition status without providing them the means to do so.Photo: “Ethiopia 3” © 2012 Swathi Sridharan/ICRISAT, used under a Creative Commons Attribution license: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0/Share this:last_img read more

New Report Provides Snapshot of SRMNAH Workforce in East and Southern Africa

first_imgKey messages from the reportThe 21 countries included in this report reflect a fairly high level of diversity across the region: Some have extremely high levels of maternal and neonatal mortality and stillbirths as well as high disease burdens; others have relatively low levels.South Africa is the only country in the region with an SRMNAH workforce that is large enough and has the appropriate skill mix to meet all of the country’s need for the 46 essential interventions for SRMNAH.The size of the SRMNAH workforce is an essential building block for effective coverage of SRMNAH services, but effective coverage depends also on accessibility, acceptability and quality. Countries with SRMNAH worker shortages must focus on increasing availability, and all countries should address the identified challenges to the provision of SRMNAH care that is accessible, acceptable and high quality.Countries are working hard to expand the SRMNAH workforce and deliver equitable services, but accurate workforce planning is dependent on accurate workforce data. A minimum of 10 pieces of information should be collected on all cadres:HeadcountPercentage time spent on SRMNAHRoles of each cadreAge distribution of current workforceRetirement ageDuration of educationNumber of students enrolling per yearEducation attrition rateNumber of new graduates joining the workforce each yearVoluntary attrition from the workforce ShareEmailPrint To learn more, read: However, comprehensive, disaggregated data for determining the availability, accessibility, acceptability and quality of the SRMNAH workforce are not routinely and easily available, even to those tasked with making decisions about workforce planning and deployment.In order for the SRMNAH workforce to work effectively, health facilities need to be equipped to offer the appropriate services, including for emergencies (access to safe blood, cesarean sections, newborn resuscitation). All hospitals and primary care facilities in the region tend to be designated to offer these services, but relatively few are sufficiently well equipped to be able to provide them routinely.Legislation, regulation and licensing allows SRMNAH workers to provide high quality care and thus protect the health of women, adolescents and newborns. Countries in the region tend to have good policies and systems for this aspect of quality of care, but in some countries there are barriers to the effective implementation of these policies and systems.Midwives and nurse-midwives who are educated and regulated to international standards can provide 87% of the essential care needed for women, adolescents and newborns. Midwives and nurse-midwives can make a unique contribution due to their competencies covering the whole continuum of SRMNAH care, from pre-pregnancy, through antenatal care and care during childbirth, to postnatal services. The scaling up of midwifery represents a cost-effective contribution to improving SRMNAH outcomes.Are you working to expand the accessibility, acceptability and quality of your country’s SRMNAH workforce? We want to hear from you!—Download the full report.Explore other posts from the Global Maternal Health Workforce blog series and access related resources.Subscribe to receive new posts from the Maternal Health Task Force blog.Share this:center_img Posted on October 4, 2017October 5, 2017By: Sarah Hodin, Project Coordinator II, Women and Health Initiative, Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public HealthClick to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to email this to a friend (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window)The United Nations Population Fund recently published “The State of the World’s Midwifery: Analysis of the Sexual, Reproductive, Maternal, Newborn and Adolescent Health (SRMNAH) Workforce in East & Southern Africa.” The report uses the framework of the 2014 State of the World’s Midwifery report to assess the SRMNAH workforce in 21 countries: Angola, Botswana, Burundi, Comoros, Democratic Republic of Congo, Eritrea, Ethiopia, Kenya, Lesotho, Madagascar, Malawi, Mozambique, Namibia, Rwanda, South Africa, South Sudan, Swaziland, Tanzania, Uganda, Zambia and Zimbabwe.last_img read more