Memorial match for ‘Roycee’ raises over €4,000 for Irish Kidney Association

first_imgDUNLEWEY Celtic have presented the proceeds of a recent memorial match for Michéal ‘Roycee’ Roarty to the Irish Kidney Association House.Dunlewey held the match on August 4 at Glentornan Park.The game was in memory of Michéal, a player with the club who was one of four young men to lose their life in a horrific accident in west Donegal in January. The game raised funds for Irish Kidney Association House in Beaumont, Dublin as Michéal was a patient in the Renal Centre there a few years ago and his family selected this charity when approached about the game.The memorial match helped to raise €4,255.00 with the thanks of the local communities and beyond. Michéal ‘Roycee; RoartyThe club said: “We would like to thank everyone who donated and came out to support us on the day even though the weather was against us. “We would like to thank all the players that got involved and all the ladies that helped serve the food and all the sponsors that were kind enough to donate to us, Roarty’s Shop Dunlewey, An Chúirt Hotel, Donegal Bouncy Castles, Óstán Loch Altan, The Dunlewey Committee, Eamonn Coyle Memorials, Paul A Roarty Electrician and Ionad Cois Locha.” Memorial match for ‘Roycee’ raises over €4,000 for Irish Kidney Association was last modified: October 9th, 2019 by Chris McNultyShare this:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to share on Pocket (Opens in new window)Click to share on Telegram (Opens in new window)Click to share on WhatsApp (Opens in new window)Click to share on Skype (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window) Tags:DunleweyDunlewey CelticIrish Kidney AssociationMícheál RoartyRoyceelast_img read more

Fans call for boycott, react to Giants owner’s controversial donations

first_imgFans of the San Francisco Giants have taken to social media to voice their outrage over recent political donations made by one of the team’s owners, Charles B. Johnson.Charles Johnson, chairman of Franklin Templeton Investments, is also the principal owner of the San Francisco Giants.Civil rights activist Dr. Harry Edwards and Oakland-based attorney John Burris announced a “total boycott” of the Giants Sunday after election filings revealed that Johnson had donated the maximum $2,700 to the …last_img read more

Piketty’s focus on inequality may also set a blueprint for the study of economics

first_imgThomas Piketty garnered international acclaim after his book Capital in the Twenty-First Century, about inequality, became a best seller. But it’s not without its critics. He’ll speak at the 13th Nelson Mandela Annual Lecture. Watch him on the live broadcast on 3 October on SABC 2 from 3pm to 4:30pm. There will also be live stream on the Nelson Mandela Foundation YouTube account and website. Thomas Piketty’s book Capital in the Twenty-First Century has been praised and criticised. (Image: Nelson Mandela Foundation, Facebook) • Thomas Piketty to deliver Nelson Mandela Annual Lecture  • What South Africa can learn from Piketty about addressing inequality?  • Piketty’s contribution to unpacking inequality: timely and relevant  • Top 50 Brands in South Africa named  • Almost half of African millionaires make South Africa their home Chris Edwards, University of East AngliaThe economic and political focus is increasingly on the inequality of income and wealth as they both rise in Europe and the US. At a conference on Inclusive Capitalism held near the end of May at London’s Guildhall, Christine Lagarde, the head of the International Monetary Fund (IMF), claimed that rising inequality posed a threat to growth and financial stability and that governments need to narrow the gaps through imposing more progressive taxes.When even the right-wing IMF criticises rising inequality, then perhaps it is no surprise that the publishing world should witness the huge success of a book on inequality written by Thomas Piketty, professor at the Paris School of Economics. What might be more surprising is that one crucial effect of his work might be nothing to with inequality or capital whatsoever, but could instead help to refocus how we study economics and arrive at less biased conclusions.Piketty’s basic argument is simple. He argues that over the past four decades the growth of incomes in the rich countries of Europe and the US has averaged 1% or 2% a year whereas the return on wealth or capital has been running at more than 4% a year. Under such conditions, wealth concentration grows as does political tension. We are, he says, returning to a sort of Downton Abbey world of the late 19th and early 20th century; a “patrimonial” capitalism in which inherited wealth dominates and a world in which the economy is characterised, not by talented individuals, but by family dynasties making up only 1% of the population. To join this exclusive club it is more sensible to marry into wealth than to work for it. It might be said that skiving and seducing are now better than striving (whatever Britain’s prime minister might say).Data minePiketty’s contribution has been to look at the pattern of wealth and income inequality in capitalist economies over at least the past 100 years. He, with the aid of a number of colleagues, has assembled a huge collection of statistics on income and wealth distribution in some 20 countries.What comes out of this is his claim that over the past century in Europe and more particularly in the US, the share of income going to the richest 1% has followed a U-shaped arc. In 1910 the richest 1% received around a fifth of total income in both Britain and the United States. By 1950 that share had been cut by at least half, but since 1980 the share of this 1% has surged so much that in the US that it’s back to where it was a century ago. The same pattern has been followed by the distribution of wealth.This U-shaped arc is the opposite of what was supposed to happen according to Simon Kuznets, a Belarusian-American economist who, in the 1950s, forecast an inverted U-curve for income distribution as an economy grows. In other words, according to Kuznets, as economies mature they are supposed to be more equal. According to Piketty, the opposite is happening with Europe and the US, heading back towards a Dickensian world of inequality.To avoid this, corrective steps are needed. Piketty favours a graduated wealth tax, imposed globally, an income tax of 80% on those with the highest salaries and an enforced transparency for all bank transactions.The controversyPiketty’s book has been broadly supported by economists in the centre of the political spectrum. Paul Krugman (the Nobel Prize-winning US economist based at Princeton University and the op-ed columnist for the New York Times) has praised it profusely. There have been attacks from both the political left and the right but particularly from the right. The Wall Street Journal has been apoplectic and the London-based Financial Times has been none too pleased.In these circles of the political right, arguments about the distribution of income and wealth invariably follow two routes. One is to deny that the rich are doing exceptionally well. The other is to claim that the rich deserve their soaring incomes and wealth and are really job creators not predators.The first of these counterattacks was launched by Chris Giles, the FT’s economics editor. He argued that Piketty was wrong to claim that inequality has grown over the past 40 years in Europe and the US. Statistics on income and wealth distribution are problematic. But, in my experience, income and wealth equality is generally over-stated rather than under-stated in rich countries – and this is true of the UK . It is to Piketty’s credit that he has shown all the statistics that he has used and he has said that: “I have no doubt that my historical data series can be improved and will be improved in the future”.In the meantime the general conclusion about the attack on Piketty by the FT seems to be summed up by the centre-right Economist magazine, namely that “the analysis does not seem to support many of the allegations made by the FT or the conclusion that the book’s argument is wrong”.Thus, the counterattack seems to fail. Inequality does seem to have increased over the past 40 years in Europe and the US. What about the second defence? Do the rich deserve their soaring incomes and wealth? Piketty argues “no” because the marginal productivity of managers is unmeasurable and economic performance has not improved since the 1960s while the pay of top managers has exploded.A critical assessment from the left has come from David Harvey, a Marxist professor at the City University of New York. Harvey criticises his book on a number of grounds. Here I have the space to focus on just one, namely Piketty’s failure to make the link between the increase in inequality, the financial crisis in 2008 and the recession that followed. Harvey argues that a rise in inequality increases the likelihood of slow growth as demand dries up and under-consumption takes hold.Interestingly, Harvey’s focus on the link between inequality and slow growth brings us back to the IMF in which a recent study by a number of economists finds that countries with high levels of inequality have suffered lower growth than nations that have distributed incomes more evenly.Despite his misgivings, Harvey does praise Piketty’s collection of statistics and it is here that we might find a final, and possibly enduring legacy from Piketty’s work.Krugman has said Piketty’s work will “change both the way we think about society and the way we do economics”. Perhaps. If the latter is true, it will be a breath of fresh air to those groups of students who have protested recently about the non-empirical, neo-liberal bias in the teaching of economics in British universities. It might be too much to hope that we can entirely detach macroeconomics from ideology, but the weight of authority brought by Piketty’s – and his colleagues’ – reliance on deep data analysis might at least offer us a blueprint for a better way of debating the dismal science.Chris Edwards, External Research Associate, , University of East AngliaThis article was originally published on The Conversation. Read the original article.last_img read more

Anti-corruption efforts awarded in South Africa

first_img17 September 2015Zanele Mxunyelwa, the National Treasury’s head of specialised audit services, was named the 2015 Certified Examiner of the Year at a gala dinner of the Association of Certified Fraud Examiners (ACFE) held at the Sandton Convention Centre, on 15 September.“As South Africans, we have a responsibility to prevent fraud and corruption. It is a struggle that must be fought by all of us,” Mxunyelwa said. “With our well educated future generation who understand the impact of fraud and corruption in hindering service delivery, I strongly believe that we will eliminate this scourge.”She joined the National Treasury in 2010, and took it upon herself to set up the first forensic investigation unit for the country. “We are responsible to conduct forensic investigation for all spheres of government and co-ordinating all investigations and feed them to the Anti-Corruption Task Team,” Mxunyelwa said.“We are also assisting the country to investigate foreign bribery. My unit is capacitated with advocates, chartered accountants, cyber specialists and there are 10 forensic firms that are assisting us throughout the country. I believe that we will conquer and we will succeed.”The significance of the award, she added, was increased awareness from the public about the National Treasury and its work in fighting fraud and dishonesty.“No one talks about the National Treasury in terms of dealing with fraud and corruption in the country. No one knows that we exist; no one knew where to report fraudulent activities. Now that we’ve won the top awards, it means people will know that there are effective fraud busters at the National Treasury.”Congratulations on fighting a good fight“While we congratulate [Zanele Mxunyelwa] for her tireless efforts, we also need to warn those who are planning to get involved in the corrupt and fraudulent activities to refrain from doing so before our law catches up with them,” said Communications Minister Faith Muthambi at the event.She commended the National Treasury for winning the ACFE corporate member award. “We congratulate the National Treasury for their efforts of saving millions if not billions of rands of the taxpayer’s money.”#ACFE gala dinner. CFE of the year award goes to Zanele Mxunyelwa. National Treasury going home with a second award . Congratulations!— Claudelle von Eck(@CvonEck)September 15, 2015Zanele Mxunyelwa receiving CFE of the year award at ACFE Gala Dinner#fraudconf@ACFESApic.twitter.com/lGyoL3d64f— Morne Britz (@Morne_73)September 16, 2015About the ACFEThe ACFE is recognised as the only professional body for fraud and forensic examination practitioners in South Africa.“As a non-profit professional body we exist to improve the level of professionalism and positively influence the quality of advice delivered by our members,” reads the company website.Source: SAnews.gov and SAinfo reporterlast_img read more

Google Asks Manufacturers to Hold Off on Google TV Debut at CES

first_imgTags:#Google#web Related Posts A Web Developer’s New Best Friend is the AI Wai… Top Reasons to Go With Managed WordPress Hosting Why Tech Companies Need Simpler Terms of Servic…center_img mike melanson 8 Best WordPress Hosting Solutions on the Market It looks like there’s been an interruption in Google’s regularly scheduled programming. The company has asked three separate television makers to hold off on their Google TV debuts at the Consumer Electronics Show in Las Vegas next month after receiving a round of lukewarm reviews.Already, both Sony and Logitech have released Internet-enabled TVs and Google TV devices, but Google has asked other companies to hold off until it can “refine the software”, reports The New York Times. According to the Times, “Google has asked the TV makers to delay their introductions, according to people familiar with the company’s plans, so that it can refine the software, which has received a lukewarm reception. The late request caught some of the manufacturers off guard.”Google just released one such refinement last week, introducing a voice-controlled Android remote app, enhanced controls over split screen viewing and refined movie searches. The biggest feature of last week’s update, however, was a Netflix app that was actually worth using. No longer do Google TV users need to use a separate device to choose content to view on their Google TV. It’s problems like this that left many early users complaining that Google TV wasn’t ready for prime time and it seems that Google has heard that message.An unusable Netflix app, however, is just the beginning. As Janko Roettgers points out at GigaOm, Google TV is missing several features that would make it a whole, usable product, such as apps. It also needs to differentiate itself and embrace the idea that it is indeed a cord-cutting device and not just a tool for users to enhance pay TV service. (Currently, Google TV only works with Dish Network, further limiting its attractiveness to potential users.)According to the Times, “TV makers have been asked to hold off on releasing products until Google completes the new version of its software, adding features like an application store,” which means we aren’t likely to see more Google TV devices until some time in early 2011.last_img read more

Inspections: Crucial Links in the Weatherization Chain

first_imgWe’ve been making noise for a while now about how slowly stimulus-funded weatherization has gotten underway in parts of the country where confusion and caution have delayed its implementation.The sluggish starts may be frustrating, but they also are predictable given the increased scale of the Weatherization Assistance Program and the thousands of moving parts in its bureaucratic machinery. What’s more, the measure of WAP’s success or failure probably won’t be pegged to the efficiency of its rollout. Final results – the number of jobs the expanded program creates and the quality of the weatherization – will matter much more.This week, a New York Times update on the Department of Energy’s response to weatherization-work audits in Illinois – detailed in a December 3 Department of Energy report – brought the work-quality issue, and the procedures meant to ensure high-quality work, into focus.Spread too thinWith the DOE’s approval and $242 million in stimulus funds, the Illinois Home Weatherization Assistance Program aims to weatherize about 29,300 homes of people with low incomes. WAP rules require that each state, through local agencies that administer the program for their communities, inspect 5% of weatherized homes. As the Times story notes, state officials in Illinois said they had inspected 5% of the homes where work was done, but not 5% of the homes weatherized by each of the 35 local agencies handling weatherization work. Work by seven agencies hadn’t been inspected at all, while work by three others hadn’t been inspected in enough volume to meet the 5% minimum.A state hiring freeze delayed a plan to hire more people to help administer the inspection program. In addition, federal inspectors had not made required site visits, prompting the DOE’s inspector general to step in and send a team out to examine work in five homes.From the DOE report: “We identified significant internal control deficiencies in the management of the Weatherization Program in Illinois which require immediate attention. Specifically, our audit testing revealed significant problems with onsite monitoring and inspection of the Illinois Home Weatherization Assistance Program (Illinois). We noted that the Department had not fulfilled its requirement to perform monitoring visits at the State level. In addition, Illinois officials had not complied with the Department’s requirements for inspecting weatherization work conducted by local agencies.“Finally, we found that a weatherization inspection for one of the local agencies failed to detect substandard installation of energy saving materials. This case involved a furnace gas leak that could have resulted in serious injury to the occupants and material damage to the structure. This is an interim report and our audit work remains in progress.”Getting a grip sooner rather than laterThe report also points out that Illinois is just now developing an automated system for aggregating inspection data and tracking the performance of contractors.The inspection lapses are troubling not only because safety problems went undetected but because the DOE inspection – which quickly resulted in a DOE “management alert,” underscoring the seriousness of the situation to the agencies involved – hints at systemic problems in the state’s program that touch on everything from worker training to contractor competence to staffing levels.A potential positive in all of this is that the problems became apparent in the early going rather than in, say, late 2010, when Illinois will have moved much farther down the path to completing work in 29,300 homes, which will require about 1,465 inspections. Most important of all, though, is that the alarms set off by the DOE are heard loud and clear not only by officials in Illinois but by every agency in the nation doing WAP work.last_img read more

French journalist detained in J&K for filming pellet victims

first_imgJammu and Kashmir Police has arrested a French journalist in Srinagar for making a documentary on pellet victims.“Comiti Paul Edward has been detained for violating visa norms in Srinagar,” a senior police officer said. Mr. Edward was arrested on Sunday evening from Kothibagh area. He was meeting separatists and pellet victims in the city to shoot his documentary, the officer said.Scores of protesting youths suffered injuries from pellet guns used in 2016 following an unrest in the valley after the July 8 killing of Hizbul commander Burhan Wani. Some lost vision totally or partially after their injuries. Mr. Edward has a passport and a business visa for India, valid upto December 22, 2018, the officer said.A business visa does not allow anyone to make a documentary on political or security related issues. An FIR under section 14B of the Passport Act has been registered against the French national, he said. The French Embassy has also been informed about Edward’s detention, the officer said.last_img read more

Bihar constrained by low per capita income, needs special status: Nitish

first_imgBihar Chief Minister Nitish Kumar on July 12 told the assembly that his government felt hamstrung when it came to hiking the amount paid to beneficiaries of welfare schemes, a reason why he has been pressing for the special category status.Mr. Kumar also insisted that the State’s per capita income was “significantly lower” than the national average.“You talk about Haryana and Tamil Nadu. While comparing the amount paid (to beneficiaries of social welfare schemes) there, please also look at their per capita income vis–vis ours,” he said.“As a matter of fact, Bihar’s per capita income stands at less than Rs 40,000, which is significantly lower than the national average. This is the primary reason why we seek special status,” Mr. Kumar added, while responding to a calling attention motion introduced by a host of opposition leaders, including veteran Rashtriya Janata Dal (RJD) MLA Abdul Bari Siddiqui. The motion had sought to draw the government’s attention towards the fact that the amount paid under welfare schemes in Bihar was far less than that doled out by the states of Tamil Nadu, Telangana and Andhra Pradesh. For a pension scheme, the amount paid to beneficiaries in the state stood at ₹400 per month, while in Tamil Nadu and Telangana it was ₹1000, in Haryana it was ₹1800 and in Andhra Pradesh ₹2000, it said. Demand for special status for Bihar arose with the creation of Jharkhand in 2000, which deprived the state of its mineral-rich, relatively more industrialized and urbanized southern districts.It grew stronger in 2005 with ascendance to power of Mr. Kumar, who has often made the “special status’ issue a poll plank. After the 14th Finance Commission did away with the provision, the Chief Minister has, on many occasions, urged the Centre to make necessary amendments so that Bihar could get its due.“You (Siddiqui) have served as the state finance minister. I wish you had taken our financial situation into account before raising your question. You are comparing Bihar with states where the per capita income is higher than the national average,” Mr. Kumar said, turning towards the RJD leader.“Moreover, please do keep in mind that Bihar is the first state in the country to have introduced its own universal pension scheme – Mukhyamantri Vriddhajan Pension Yojana,” he added. Unlike other programmes, the pension scheme does not exclude those above the poverty line, he asserted.“All men and women, not drawing any other pension, shall be eligible to receive the benefit. This would put an annual burden of Rs 1800 crore and even though we need funds for development works, we are committed to implementing the scheme,” Mr. Kumar said. Talking to reporters outside the assembly, Mr. Siddiqui, however, appeared dissatisfied with the CM’s reply.“I am glad that the chief minister took seriously the issue raised by me. But his emphasis on the state’s financial situation leaves the basic question raised in our motion unanswered. The state’s budget this year stood at about Rs 2.05 lakh crore. This is a significant rise in comparison with what the size of budget was a few years ago,” he claimed.“There has not been a commensurate rise in the welfare benefits being extended to the vulnerable sections of the society. So, we had sought to know whether these matters were not high on the government’s list of priorities,” Mr. Siddiqui added.last_img read more

AL restored oneparty BAKSAL rule

first_imgBNP secretary general Mirza Fakhrul Islam Alamgir. File PhotoBangladesh Nationalist Party (BNP) on Friday alleged that the ruling Awami League has depoliticised the country by ‘restoring one-party BAKSAL rule as it did in 1975’, reports UNB.”Now, there’s no politics in the country. Politics is now under the grip of one party,” said BNP secretary general Mirza Fakhrul Islam Alamgir.He came up with the remarks while exchanging views with local journalists at his house in Thakurgaon.The BNP leader said multiparty democracy was restored by their party founder Ziaur Rahman after Awami League had introduced one-party BAKSAL rule in 1975. “The one-party rule has now been again restored undercover of democracy.”He said their chairperson Khaleda Zia has been subjected to government’s political vengeance as she has been kept in jail by convicting her in ‘false’ cases.Fakhrul alleged that Khaleda is neither getting bail from the court nor proper treatment by the government though she is very sick.He renewed their party’s demand for shifting Khaleda to a specialised private hospital for her proper treatment.The BNP leader said Jatiya Oikya Front is united though two – MPs of Gono Forum, one of its components, took oath violating the alliance’s decision.”Organisational action has been taken against those who have taken oath. We’re united and working for the restoration of democracy. We must move forward together with people,” he said.About the stance of their party and the alliance on the current government, Fakhrul said they think Awami League has been ruling the country illegally by usurping the state power. “There’s no reason to accept such a regime.”He demanded the government immediately hold a fresh national election annulling the results of the 10th parliamentary one.last_img read more

Nonavian dinosaur found to have laid blue eggs

first_img(A) Pair of oviraptorid Heyuannia eggs (NMNS CYN-2004-DINO-05) from the Chinese province of Jiangxi before sampling. Porosity measurements and calculations of water vapor conductance are based on these eggs. Pieces of eggshell from each of the four zones depicted in (B) were used in porosity measurements. (B) Egg model separated into four zones used for zonal porosity measurements. Credit: PeerJ (2017). DOI: 10.7717/peerj.3706 This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only. (Phys.org)—A team of researchers from Germany and the U.S. has found that a non-avian dinosaur living in what is now China laid colored eggs. In their paper published on the peer-reviewed site PeerJ, the team describes their study of the egg fossils and what their findings suggest about the evolution of colored eggs in modern birds. More information: Jasmina Wiemann et al. Dinosaur origin of egg color: oviraptors laid blue-green eggs, PeerJ (2017). DOI: 10.7717/peerj.3706AbstractProtoporphyrin (PP) and biliverdin (BV) give rise to the enormous diversity in avian egg coloration. Egg color serves several ecological purposes, including post-mating signaling and camouflage. Egg camouflage represents a major character of open-nesting birds which accomplish protection of their unhatched offspring against visually oriented predators by cryptic egg coloration. Cryptic coloration evolved to match the predominant shades of color found in the nesting environment. Such a selection pressure for the evolution of colored or cryptic eggs should be present in all open nesting birds and relatives. Many birds are open-nesting, but protect their eggs by continuous brooding, and thus exhibit no or minimal eggshell pigmentation. Their closest extant relatives, crocodiles, protect their eggs by burial and have unpigmented eggs. This phylogenetic pattern led to the assumption that colored eggs evolved within crown birds. The mosaic evolution of supposedly avian traits in non-avian theropod dinosaurs, however, such as the supposed evolution of partially open nesting behavior in oviraptorids, argues against this long-established theory. Using a double-checking liquid chromatography ESI-Q-TOF mass spectrometry routine, we traced the origin of colored eggs to their non-avian dinosaur ancestors by providing the first record of the avian eggshell pigments protoporphyrin and biliverdin in the eggshells of Late Cretaceous oviraptorid dinosaurs. The eggshell parataxon Macroolithus yaotunensis can be assigned to the oviraptor Heyuannia huangi based on exceptionally preserved, late developmental stage embryo remains. The analyzed eggshells are from three Late Cretaceous fluvial deposits ranging from eastern to southernmost China. Reevaluation of these taphonomic settings, and a consideration of patterns in the porosity of completely preserved eggs support an at least partially open nesting behavior for oviraptorosaurs. Such a nest arrangement corresponds with our reconstruction of blue-green eggs for oviraptors. According to the sexual signaling hypothesis, the reconstructed blue-green eggs support the origin of previously hypothesized avian paternal care in oviraptorid dinosaurs. Preserved dinosaur egg color not only pushes the current limits of the vertebrate molecular and associated soft tissue fossil record, but also provides a perspective on the potential application of this unexplored paleontological resource. Citation: Non-avian dinosaur found to have laid blue eggs (2017, September 20) retrieved 18 August 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2017-09-non-avian-dinosaur-laid-blue-eggs.html Explore furthercenter_img Journal information: PeerJ © 2017 Phys.org Tracing the evolution of bird reproduction Many modern birds lay colored eggs—some are monochrome, like blue robin’s eggs; others are multi-colored like those of the dove. But until now, it was believed that all dinosaur eggs were white because dinosaurs laid their eggs in protected nests. In this new effort, the researchers have found an example of a dinosaur that laid blue or green eggs.The team reports that theirs was the first effort to seriously study color in dinosaur eggs. It came about after the team noted some Heyuannia huangi fossilized eggs that had a bluish tint—researchers had previously assumed the tint was due to mineralization, but the new team thought maybe there was more to it. Prior research had shown that Heyuannia huangi were dinosaurs with parrot-like beaks that walked on hind legs. The team used mass spectrometry and chromatographic separation to take a closer look at the eggs and detected traces of biliverdin and protoporphyrin, pigments commonly found in modern colored bird eggs. The eggs were also dated back to the Late Cretaceous period, which ran from 100 to 66 million years ago.The oviraptor Heyuannia huangi were also feathered dinosaurs—many of their fossils have been found over the years, but until now, no one suspected that they laid colored eggs. The coloring, the team suggests, is a strong indication that the eggs were laid in open nests—the coloring would have served as camouflage. In modern birds, only those that lay them in open nests are colored. Their finding also shows that egg coloring began before the evolution of modern birds—it started with non-avian dinosaurs and was passed down to modern ancestors.The researchers report that as a result of their find, they are taking a look at other fossilized dinosaur eggs to see if perhaps some of those also were colored.last_img read more