UEFA releases 236 million euros to aid member federations

first_imgUEFA said on Monday it had allocated 236.5 million euros ($256 million) to its 55 member associations to help overcome the financial impact caused by the coronavirus pandemic.Each national federation will receive 4.3 million euros which can be used towards “its own priorities in light of the negative impact of the coronavirus on football at all levels,” the body said in a statement.The funds come from UEFA’s HatTrick assistance program, which was created in 2004 to support development projects for each member federation. The program will have distributed 2.6 billion euros by 2024, UEFA said. Global governing body FIFA announced on Friday it would release $150 million to its 211 member associations “as the first step of a relief plan”.Those funds originate from the Forward 2.0 program, which was launched in 2016 and will provide $1.746 billion in total. Topics :center_img “Our sport is facing an unprecedented challenge brought about by the COVID-19 crisis. UEFA wants to help its members to respond in ways that are appropriate to their specific circumstances,” said UEFA president Aleksander Ceferin.”As a result, we have agreed that up to 4.3 million euros per association, paid for the remainder of this season and next, as well as part of the investment funding, can be used as our members see fit to rebuild the football community.”Last week European football’s governing body released almost 70 million euros in benefit payments to clubs struggling financially during the health crisis. The money was originally put aside to be paid to clubs who had released players for international matches after the completion of the European Championship qualifying play-offs.last_img read more

I’m terminally ill and the debate on euthanasia scares me

first_imgSydney Morning Herald 17 January 2017Family First Comment: “Recognising the full scope of human dignity, we stopped capital punishment a long time ago. Now bringing in legislation that allows a group of experts to determine who can “legally” die, seems a retrograde move. Intellectually, that worries me. And once the legislation has been approved, experience tells us that it is likely to grow exponentially. I can imagine a time when particularly frail and vulnerable people will succumb to the thought that it might be best for their families and for society in general for them to let go and die – they will agree to something because they think they ought to. That scares me.”It scares us all.The NSW community is about to debate physician-assisted death or voluntary euthanasia. No doubt one of the key ideas will be the notion that we ought to have a “free choice” when it comes to the manner of our death. This is coupled with the different understandings that people have about what it means to die with dignity. These are vitally important conversations. However, it often feels to me that the voices who want physician-assisted dying are given extra amplification by celebrities, and that, because they talk about dying with dignity, they somehow must be right. But the past four years have confirmed for me everything that my two ethics degrees have taught me: that human dignity is so inherent that it is expressed even in extreme vulnerability and not just in the good times.The debate worries and scares me on several levels. Fortunately we just don’t go around killing each other any more, so the notion that it’s a person’s “free choice” to die just doesn’t make sense.  Recognising the full scope of human dignity, we stopped capital punishment a long time ago. Now bringing in legislation that allows a group of experts to determine who can “legally” die, seems a retrograde move. Intellectually, that worries me. And once the legislation has been approved, experience tells us that it is likely to grow exponentially. I can imagine a time when particularly frail and vulnerable people will succumb to the thought that it might be best for their families and for society in general for them to let go and die – they will agree to something because they think they ought to. That scares me.I have always been an extremely private person, so the thought that my increasingly frail body will need intimate help does not thrill me. But just as I cared for and loved my friend in all her messiness and fragility, I will have to let others care for and love me in the same way. There is nothing undignified about that. So my experience of being a primary carer tells me that as I’m dying, the presence of people who have the emotional capacity to sit with me during long hours, who have the strength to continually stroke my arm, to bring me cups of water in the night, to tell me that they love me and to stay with me even if it seems that I am no longer present to them is of beyond measure. I’m sure that I will know their voices, and that I will know their touch. So as the doctors relieve my physical pain, I trust that my family and friends will abide with me so that just as I have lived, so will I die, with integrity and grace.“In 2012 my father was diagnosed with end stage stomach cancer. He was scared of the process of dying, but the people from palliative care reassured him that he would not suffer. He did suffer. I still feel guilty that I could not help him.Since that time three bills seeking to legalise assisted dying (in NSW, Tasmania and South Australia) have been rejected by state parliaments. To hear politicians blithely debating euthanasia laws is particularly galling, having experienced the painful end of this process.”READ MORE: http://www.smh.com.au/comment/im-terminally-ill-and-the-debate-on-euthanasia-scares-me-20170117-gtt0kn.htmllast_img read more

10 states now represented at US 36, Bethany IMCA openers

first_imgIMCA Executive Director of Competition Dave Brenn heads up tech inspection at Osborn. OSBORN, Mo. – Opening night events this weekend at US 36 Raceway and Bethany Speedway bring IMCA drivers from across the nation to the Show-Me State. IMCA Modified, IMCA RaceSaver Sprint Car, IMCA Sunoco Stock Car and Karl Kustoms Northern SportMod entries are also in hand from Colorado, Oklahoma, Iowa, Nebraska and Kansas, as well as Missouri.  As previously announced and emphasized by Boller, social distancing guidelines will be maintained in the pits and grandstand each night. Track officials will ask all race teams to stay within their respective pit area and that everyone attending wear a mask or other appropriate facial covering. Questions about the season-opening weekend can be directed to Boller at 816 752-3645.center_img “We had more than 100 cars practice last Saturday. Once we got to 100, we stopped counting,” continued Boller, looking forward to watching the stars of IMCA vie for the only IMCA Speedway Motors Weekly Racing National, regional, E3 Spark Plugs State and track points to be awarded in Missouri this weekend. “We’ll take as many cars as we can get in the pits using social distancing.” “We’re expecting to get drivers from a couple more states, too. It seems like the number of entries goes up every time I look at my phone,” said promoter Jon Boller Jr., who noted the strong contingent of RaceSaver Sprint Cars making the trip from out east.  IMCA drivers from Pennsylvania, Michigan, Ohio and Indiana join competitors from closer to home on season-opening cards Friday, May 8 at Osborn and Saturday, May 9 at Bethany.last_img read more