Equinor may build the world’s largest floating offshore wind project in South Korea

first_img FacebookTwitterLinkedInEmailPrint分享CNBC:Energy powerhouse Equinor has formed a consortium with the Korea National Oil Corporation and Korea East-West Power to develop a floating offshore wind project.In an announcement Thursday, Equinor said the consortium would undertake a feasibility study for the 200-megawatt project, which would be located off the coast of Ulsan, South Korea. Pending the results of that study, construction of a floating offshore wind farm will commence in 2022, with the possibility of “power production start-up” taking place in 2024.Stephen Bull, senior vice president for the wind and low carbon cluster of New Energy Solutions at Equinor, said the company was “very pleased to be member of the partnership involved in realizing the first floating offshore wind farm in Asia.”Bull added that if the project was successfully realized, it would be the world’s biggest floating wind farm.Equinor already operates Hywind Scotland, the world’s “first full-scale commercial floating offshore wind farm.” Located off the coast of Scotland, the facility has a capacity of 30-megawatts and started production in 2017.More: South Korea could soon be home to the world’s biggest floating offshore wind farm Equinor may build the world’s largest floating offshore wind project in South Korealast_img read more

DNR warns of cold water and debris in rivers

first_imgHigh water and swift currents on Iowa rivers are prompting the Department of Natural Resources to warn kayakers and canoers to find other options.River Programs outreach coordinator,Todd Robertson, says the conditions are dangerous especially for rookies and he has this advice.“Make sure you know how to control your boat properly, that you’re an efficient paddler. The best way to do that is to stay off of moving water and start practicing on flat water. Right now with the way rivers are, flat water and lakes are the safest place to be,” according to Roberston. Robertson says because the air temperatures have been well below normal, the water temperatures are cold. He says that could cause problems if you capsize because the shock of the cold may be disorienting. Robertson says the high water is sweeping a significant amount of extra material into the fast-moving current..“When you get a lot of rain, if you went and stood by the river and looked upstream you would see all this debris coming downstream,” Robertson says, “trees, tree limbs, things that have washed in off the bank, those things can be very hazardous for people.” Robertson says life jackets are a must for boaters, kayakers and canoers. He says according to Iowa law, adults do not have to wear a life jacket but there must be one onboard for each person. Children aged 12 and under are required to wear them at all times.last_img read more