Arsenal’s Lwobi fires Nigeria to 2018 World Cup

first_imgAbuja, Nigeria | AFP |  Arsenal forward Alex Lwobi sent Nigeria to the 2018 World Cup finals with the winning goal in a 1-0 African qualifying victory over Zambia on Saturday.The Super Eagles became the first African team to advance to Russia after taking an unassailable lead atop Group B. It will be their sixth World Cup finals appearance.Substitute Iwobi blasted home a pullback by Shehu Abdullahi 17 minutes from time to secure qualification.“We were lucky that Iwobi came off the bench to make the difference,” said Nigeria’s German coach Gernot Rohr.“It was a difficult game and we didn’t underrate Zambia. We knew it will be a tough game and that was the case.”Zambia coach Wedson Nyirenda felt his team had dominated for long periods.“They got a half chance and they used their experience to punish us,” he said.“But we acquitted ourselves very well. This was the best game of this group.”In a high tempo first half, Zambia thought they had taken the lead when Augustin Mulenga bundled home but his 23rd minute effort was disallowed for offside.In the 36th minute, Zambia striker Alex Ngonga, whose pace troubled the Nigeria defence throughout, forced goalkeeper Ikechukwu Ezenwa to parry the ball behind for a corner. The Super Eagles peppered the Zambian goal with shots in the closing minutes of the first half, but skipper Mikel Obi, Odion Ighalo and Moses Simon all failed to trouble Zambian goalkeeper Kennedy Mweene.Nigeria were the brighter of the two teams after the break as Wilfred Ndidi saw his looping header pushed away by Mweene.The Eagles carved out the better chances, although Zambia looked dangerous on the counter attack until Iwobi settled the affair and sent Nigeria to the World Cup finals.StandingsNigeria     5 4 1 0 11  3 13 – qualifiedZambia      5 2 1 2  6  5  7Cameroon    5 1 3 1  5  7  6Algeria     5 0 1 4  3 10  1 Share on: WhatsApplast_img read more

Shinkwin eyes England spot with impressive Hog victory

first_img23 Apr 2012 Shinkwin eyes England spot with impressive Hog victory Hampshire Hog 136 C Shinkwin (Moor Park) 68 68 139 M Young (Brokenhurst Manor) 68 71, J Titlow (Knole Park) 68 71 140 M Wallace (Moor Park) 66 74, G Samuels (Leighton Buzzard) 68 72, J Bartlett (Worthing) 65 75 Callum Shinkwin (Moor Park, Hertfordshire) boosted his chance of a call-up for next month’s international with France with an impressive victory in the Hampshire Hog at a showery and chilly North Hants yesterday. Two rounds of two-under-par 68 earned the 18 year old a three-stroke winning margin over Martin Young (Brokenhurst Manor, Hampshire, IoW & CI) and Jerome Titlow (Knole Park, Kent). Watched by England selectors, Shinkwin, who opted to miss the previous day’s Selborne Salver – won by England boys’ squad member Matt Fitzpatrick (Hallamshire, Yorkshire) – said: “This win sets up a lot of opportunities for me. My aim is next year’s Walker Cup so hopefully a full England place is a possibility.” On the eve of jetting out to Spain for a week’s coaching with the rest of the England ‘A’ squad, Shinkwin found himself three strokes off the halfway lead, held by Jack Bartlett (Worthing, Sussex), after his opening 68. But as the weather deteriorated in the afternoon with showers moving in so the scores increased, apart from Shinkwin’s. His second 68, the only sub-par return of the round, left him out of touch for the rest of the field as he signed for four birdies and two bogeys. “I didn’t find the conditions more difficult after lunch,” he added. “The only problem was continually putting on and removing waterproofs. “But I’ve been playing solid all year. This is a superb course but I didn’t hole many putts today but I hit a lot of greens. “It’s great to win this title and to have my name up there with so many famous winners such as Michael Bonallack, Peter McEvoy, Gary Wolstenholme and Justin Rose.” While Shinkwin kept his form in the afternoon, the early leaders lost ground. Bartlett followed up his 65 with 75, while Matt Wallace (Moor Park, Hertfordshire) and Gavin Samuels (Leighton Buzzard, Bedfordshire) added 74s to their opening 66s, all three finishing equal fourth. But Bartlett, winner of the Berkhamsted Trophy three weeks earlier, had to consolation of lifting the Hampshire Salver for the best aggregate over the Selborne Salver and the Hog. He finished tied on 278 with Fitzpatrick but won on countback for his 140 at the Hog against Fitzpatrick’s 145. However, the Yorkshire teenager began the weekend by winning the Selborne Salver at Blackmoor with a 36-hole tally of 133 after a superb opening 63. He finished a shot ahead of ‘A’ squad member Jonathan Bell (Royal Blackheath, Kent) and Paul Howard (Southport & Ainsdale, Lancashire). Leading final scores Selborne Salver 133 M Fitzpatrick (Hallamshire) 63 70 134 J Bell (Royal Blackheath) 67 67, P Howard (Southport & Ainsdale) 66 68 136 P Tarver Jones (Worthing) 64 72 Hampshire Salver 278 J Bartlett (Worthing) 138, 140; M Fitzpatrick (Hallamshire) 133 145 (Bartlett won on countback)last_img read more

Deaths of NFL players speak volumes about self-destructive culture

first_imgDuring our panel on Black male fatherhood in New York City last week, I spoke with several NBA players, an NFL player and NBA Player’s Association Executive Director Billy Hunter about the culture of Black male athletes. One of the things that has consistently concerned me is the culture of self-destructive behavior which seems to walk hand-in-hand with being a Black male athlete. Popping bottles at the club, “getting it in” with random women and putting yourself into one horrible situation after another has become almost a requirement for young men trying to fit into this culture.Let me be one of the first to publicly say, “This sh*t is stupid.” There’s no point in being polite about this conversation, since people are dying because we refuse to speak up.The common factors in both the Belcher murder-suicide and the death of Jerry Brown are that a) they both occurred on the weekend, b) they both involved excessive amounts of alcohol and c) they were probably leaving “da club” or some other social gathering when their lives came to an end. As a result, one Black man is in prison, two Black men are dead, one Black woman is also dead and at least two Black babies are going to grow up without their fathers.We owe it to our young men to speak candidly about the dangers of excessive alcohol consumption and teach them the value of critical thinking when it comes to avoiding the many creative ways to destroy your life and the lives of those you care about. Right before his death, Jerry Brown was openly questioning the value of “the fast life” on his Facebook page, wondering if this life is conducive to his being a good father and husband one day.I would have loved to sit down with this brother to say, “No man, it’s not. Your daughter, girlfriend, and mother all need you to be the best man you can be. I don’t care what you’re hearing on the radio every morning, but nothing good has ever been accomplished by an entire segment of the population that spends all of its time getting high and drunk every other day. Brother, you are better than that.”One of the reasons I respect former New York Giant David Tyree is that he speaks openly about how alcoholism put him in a jail cell just a few years ago. During our panel in Harlem, Tyree shared his experience as a cautionary tale for young men who don’t understand the value of thinking outside the slave box. We may no longer be physically enslaved, but many of us are psychologically enslaved by media that presents imagery of black men as animal-like creatures with no productive direction. Another panelist, former Washington Wizards player Etan Thomas, said it best when he said that, “They do these things because they are afraid of us and what might happen if we were to realize our truest potential.”Now, because no one, to my knowledge, had a candid, honest conversation with Jerry Brown about the dangers of “the fast life,” he died before having the chance to figure out that this life just isn’t worth it. There are more productive and fulfilling things to do on a Friday night than to sit around popping bottles at the club. We must share this message with our young men EVERY CHANCE WE GET.Additionally, we must rethink the culture surrounding many young Black men who define themselves as nothing but dumb jocks. We must empower them to use their platforms, wealth and opportunity to do great things and not to transform themselves into victims of an oppressive partnership. Black male athletes are among the strongest, fastest, most intelligent and most courageous warriors in the entire Black community. They must not be allowed to be transformed into sad little sheep.(Dr. Boyce Watkins is a professor at Syracuse University and author of the book, “Black American Money.”) DR. BOYCE WATKINS by Dr. Boyce WatkinsFor New Pittsburgh Courier (YourBlackWorld.com)—Dallas Cowboys defensive lineman Josh Brent has been charged with intoxication manslaughter after he was involved in an accident this weekend that killed his teammate, Jerry Brown. This is the second tragedy that has hit the NFL in recent days. Most of us know about the death of Jovan Belcher of the Kansas City Chiefs, who killed his girlfriend and himself, also on a weekend rampage.last_img read more

AH Tree Planting Honors Memory of Paul Boyd

first_imgATLANTIC HIGHLANDS — The borough honored the memory of environmentalist-historian Paul Boyd on Saturday, Oct. 22 with the planting of a tree in the Municipal Yacht Harbor.Shade Tree Commission Chairman Louise I. Donoghue presided over the ceremony that drew over 50 residents atthe base of the Colorado Blue Spruce planted at the entrance of the marina. A plaque in Boyd’s honor will installed at a later date.Among those speaking during the ceremony were formerMayor Peter E. Donoghue, borough Historical Society PresidentJoann Dellosso, Richard and Carolyn Campo Marcolus, Boyd’sfriend Victor Zak and Benson Chiles, representing the FrontPorch Club, who presented a check for $500 toward the purchase of the tree.The tree purchase was financed jointly by the Shade Tree Commission and the Front Porch Club, which applied funds from its annual Chilifest to the project.The planting is part of a commission program to honor local residents, past or present, for their efforts on behalf of the community.Boyd, who died earlier this year, was a long-time activist in the Historical Society, helping secure funding to refurbish the society’s museum, the Strauss Mansion, and he was society president at the time of his death.He was a founder and long-time chairman of the borough’s Environmental Commission and played a major role in the establishment of the town’s Lenape Woods Preserve and Monmouth County’s Popomora Park. Boyd also worked to acquire the financing to complete the Bayshore Trail. He also repeatedly demonstrated his commitment to a greener borough by orchestrating Earth Day observations and beach cleanups.Boyd also successfully documented the borough’s historic past, as author of his 2004 the book “Atlantic Highlands: From Lenape Camps to Bayshore Towns.”last_img read more

On A Wintry Day in RB, Soup is Super

first_imgGary Sable of That Hot Dog Place in Red Bank serves up some soup on a chilly afternoon in Red Bank recently. While soup is popular year-round, demand definitely rises when Old Man Winter comes to town. RED BANK — Bread may be the staff of life as the old proverb goes. But, boy, that cup of soup — especially on a cold day — can brighten a meal and a day.It was damp and rainy last Thursday afternoon as Andy Anderson ran into Readie’s 39 Broad Street, for a quick lunch. On his agenda that day, as it turns out most days, was a container of soup. “I don’t have a lot of time for lunch and it’s fast,” he said, and he likes the health benefits of eating soup for lunch. “I try to watch what I eat,” Anderson said.Red Bank has any number of locations that offer a variety of soups on any given day.“We sell a lot of soup year ’round, but this time of year, look around,” said Readie’s owner Tom Fishkin, as he scanned the small dining area, where indeed most of the customers on hand for a late lunch seemed to have soup containers in front of them and plastic spoons in their fists.Fishkin confided, “Our hope is they’ll eat it year ’round.”Readie’s, which recently moved on to Broad Streert after many years on Monmouth Street, prepares about four different soups daily. Among the four, he said, are two “regular” types, meaning “all purpose” usually chicken based, a vegetarian-style and a seafood-based. Selection. He offers one cream soup every day, “Because it’s popular,” Fishkin said.Though, not for Anderson. “I like anything that is not creamy,” he said. “I have to watch my diet.”Readie’s makes its own soups daily, with some of the most popular being turkey with wild rice and the traditional chicken noodle.The key to a good soup, Fishkin explained, is using “good, fresh ingredients,” and equally important, “Don’t rush it.”“Our soups are not complicated,” he said. “Most of the soups we make,  a conscientious homemaker can make it.”The key to success is familiarity. “When people go out for dinner they might be adventurous,” Fishkin said; but for lunch, when they have limited time, people stick to what they know.And the weather plays a role, too. “If I know it’s going to be a rainy day, I’ll have a chili,” he said. “It’s a natural.”“The weather definitely factors into it,” says Gary Sable, owner and operator of That Hot Dog Place/Soupmeister, located at Victorian Courtyard, 30 Monmouth Street.“If it’s a cold, rainy, nasty day you bring out your heavy hitters,” he said, which can be Italian wedding, chicken tortilla or spicy sausage. “People will always eat chicken noodle soup,” he stated matter-of-factly.And he would know, Sable has been operating his small take-out shop for 17 years, arriving before 5 a.m. to prepare his three-five soups daily. “Anyone who has the slightest bit of a sniffle, they want chicken soup.”His selections range from the traditional standard-bearers like chicken noodle to a vegetarian offering and “sometimes a weird one,” like a recent choice of chicken stroganoff  or oxtail soup to round out his menu of hot dogs and deli sandwiches.“You go light in the summer, and not just amount,” he adds. Though he does sell less soup in the warm weather, those he does sell tend to be the brothier types. “Cream soups, you can’t give them away in the summer.”But in the winter, “go heavy,” he says, meaning heartier soups and more of them.His favorite? “My favorite was the first soup I ever made: beef barley. It’s still my favorite. I make it all the time.”“Ingredients are the key,” he stressed. “It’s only as good as the ingredients. And it’s important not to be stingy.“It’s just as easy to make a pot of soup with three chickens in it as one.”He also offered a little secret, given him by his mother, for beef stock soups — shinbones. “It makes the best soups, it adds a lot of flavor.”Mike Tierney, who owns No Joe’s Café, 51 Broad Street, agreed that preparation is the key.“That goes for anything,” he said.“If you prepare properly, with all the right ingredients, that’s when you’re going to be a success,” he predicted.No Joe’s use to make its own soups on site for years but has since started having it delivered from Hale and Hearty, a New York City-based company, which does it better than he could, Tierney said.Some of the most successful selections at No Joe’s are chicken pot pie, and a new one, Senegalese chicken peanut, a tomato-based type. “It is phenomenal,” he insisted.He sells soup all year, although he sells more in the colder months. But even when it’s warm, “It always goes. I never throw it out.”And what’s great about soups, is you can experiment, add different ingredients to create a new variation. “It’s a great way to get through your inventory,” Tierney said. “You’re just throwing stuff in. But that’s how soups are made.”The appeal of soup is “comfort, biggest thing,” Sable summed up. Besides, “It’s healthy and inexpensive, and that’s important now.”“It’s certainly comfort food,” said Rob Atkinson, who has been coming to Sable’s for the 15 years he’s worked in Red Bank. “It gets you through the afternoon.”Sable swears by its healthfulness and rejuvenating powers “Did you ever see anyone who eats a lot of soup that’s fat?” asked the railthin Sable. “I eat soup every day and I’m not fat.”last_img read more

Ranney Middle School Students Honored with National Awards

first_imgTINTON FALLS – Ranney’s Middle School has started off the New Year on a note of accomplishment.The MAG, Ranney’s Middle School literary and art magazine, has carried on what has now become a nationally-recognized winning tradition. The student editorial staff and advisor, Lorrie Benditt, recently earned awards from Columbia and American Scholastic Press associations for the Origins edition (Volume 1) of the 2011-2012 MAG and the Future of Technology (Volume 2).The Columbia Scholastic Press Association granted The MAG the Gold Award after the publication scored an impressive 851 out of a possible 1,000 points. The literary and art magazine earned a first-place award with special merit from the American Scholastic Press Association, placing it at the top of the category: Private/Parochial Schools with an enrollment of 500-1,000. “I am so appreciative of the continued recognition The MAG receives after all of the hard work that goes into its production,” Benditt said. “Each year, the editors, staff and I learn more about the writing, editing and layout processes.”The American Scholastic Press Association also recognized Brittany Hofferber ’17 of Little Silver with an Outstanding Poem Award for her contribution of Fall is Like a Show. According to the ASPA, the award was given to only four students nationwide this year. “Brittany wrote her poem after a lesson based on an idea from the annual press days at Columbia University which we attend every fall,” Benditt said. “These press days have helped a great deal.”In 2012, the magazine’s Volume 13 issues entitled Fairytales & Fantasy and Summertime 2011 were granted a First Prize with Special Merit award from the American Scholastic Press Association and a silver medal from the Columbia Scholastic Press Association. In 2010, The MAG’s 50th anniversary edition not only received a First Prize with Special Merit, but was also named Best Middle School Literary Art Magazine, a recognition bestowed upon only three schools throughout the U.S.last_img read more

Mallard’s Source for Sports Team of the Week — Trafalgar Totems

first_imgRemember when the weather was warm and sunny? For those readers Mallard’s Source for Sports would like to take a trip down memory lane to the green grass fields to spotlight the Trafalgar Totems Fieldhockey squad as Team of the Week. The Totems, coached by none other than Jesse Anast, finished the junior season with great results. The team includes, back row, L-R, coach Jesse Anast, Emma Gregorich, Ali Zondervan, Kyra Burkart, Noelle Wang, Jacqueline Van Horne, Naiomi Perkins, Alyssa Hill and Caitlyn Maida. Front, Marley Reynolds, Taylor Zimmer, McKenna Bennet, Emma Wheeldon, Ashley Zarikoff, Anna Milde, Julia Burkart, Hanna Quinn and Olivia ReRevillia. The goalie is, Noa Butterfield.last_img read more

BUENA VISTA STAKES QUOTES

first_imgGARY STEVENS, DIVERSY HARBOR, WINNER: “Kent chirped to his filly leaving the gate and I said ‘Good, somebody’s gonna put some pressure on La Tia.‘ I was working her last week and she did tremendous, she’s matured a lot; she’s push-button. She showed a nice kick; I can’t believe how much she’s matured. Like all good fillies, she’s got a mind of her own but she’s gotten more cooperative and I’ve gotten to know her a lot better with working her in the mornings. She’s turning into one of my favorites quickly.” TRAINER QUOTES JOCKEY QUOTES JOEL ROSARIO, LA TIA, SECOND: “She was going easy, even when that horse came to our outside, she was still comfortable. She did everything she could but we just got beat. We were second-best today.” AIMEE DOLLASE, ASSISTANT TO TOM PROCTOR, WINNER: “She’s maturing so much. That was excellent. He (Kent Desormeaux on Blingismything) did help her on the pace. That’s what she’s been lacking in a lot of her races, is pace up front, but she still closes really strong, so that definitely helped us today.“She had to run down a really nice filly. La Tia is a solid mare.” NOTES: The winning owner is Leonard Lavin of Ocala, FL, who races as Glen Hill Farm -30-last_img read more