City manager offers film-production tips

first_img AD Quality Auto 360p 720p 1080p Top articles1/5READ MORECasino Insider: Here’s a look at San Manuel’s new high limit rooms, Asian restaurant Padilla said when people think of the movie business they often focus on big-name actors, directors and producers or the “eight-dollar cost of a ticket.” He wants city officials to think bigger. “A big reason for the session we had was to educate (leaders) about what production really does for our economy and job creation,” he said. “There is a misperception that the Hollywood industry is only important for Los Angeles. Here is a perfect example of that not being the case. It is important for Santa Clarita and should be important for other cities throughout California.” Padilla is the current president of the League of California Cities, a group that provides education and advocacy services for officials in the state’s 478 cities. Annual board meetings held in the president’s town showcase local issues that have statewide implications. Friday’s event, hosted by the Motion Picture Association of America, was held at Paramount Studios. On Wednesday, Pulskamp reflected on panelists’ musings that “Detroit is the place where they used to make cars. … We want to make sure that Los Angeles doesn’t become the place where they used to make films. We were gratified they thought of us when they were looking for a city that works well with the film industry and business in general.” Pulskamp had emphasized how an increase in TV production helped neutralize the loss of dollars from film companies that fled to distant shores. “NCIS,” “24,” HBO’s “Deadwood” and “Big Love” are all shot in town. Pulskamp said an average of three productions film locally each day. “War of the Worlds,” “X-Men 3,” “Spiderman” and the “Pirates of the Caribbean” sequel have filmed here. SANTA CLARITA – City Manager Ken Pulskamp touted the merits of being a filming-friendly city to a gathering of statewide officials on the lookout for ways to boost their city’s bottom line. Seated on a panel elbow to elbow with a Los Angeles councilman and several entertainment-industry heavyweights last week, Pulskamp shared how Santa Clarita’s nimble permit process and hungry pursuit of location shoots helped net more than $16 million in 2005. Pulskamp was tapped for his know-how by several fans, including Los Angeles City Council President Alex Padilla, who serves as president of the statewide group that sponsored the event Friday. “I want to keep production in the city of Los Angeles, but we know the film industry is competitive. If Los Angeles is going to lose film production to somewhere else I would rather it be as local as possible,” Padilla said. “What Ken was able to provide at this venue is a true local-government perspective of what production means for a community.” The Santa Clarita film office, established in 2002, does not charge a business-license fee or utility-users’ tax. Jason Crawford, the city’s film administrator, has attributed the area’s popularity to its “pro-filming attitude and our proximity to Los Angeles without feeling like Los Angeles.” The film office manages a Web site and has issued a comprehensive film guide designed to help directors, location managers and production companies navigate more easily through the wealth of local resources. Crawford coordinates road closures and filming in city parks and around town. Santa Clarita is within the desirable 30-mile zone – proximity to Hollywood – along with about 97 other local cities. When film crews set up shop, they fill hotel rooms and buy lumber, supplies, clothing and food. In 2005, hotel-industry consultant PKF said the city’s hotel-occupancy rates – at 81 percent – were among the top in Los Angeles County, Pulskamp said. Filming plays a big role in filling the rooms, he said. The film business is among the top four industries in Santa Clarita. Ten movie ranches, 20 soundstages and production-related companies operate in town. Michael Kelly, deputy director of the California Film Commission, which strives to attract and retain filming, said Crawford is “100 percent helpful in finding locations.” The organization partners with about 57 local film offices, and Kelly points to Santa Clarita as a good model. Other popular cities are Pasadena, Santa Monica, Culver City, San Diego, parts of Orange County and San Francisco. But far-flung spots have lured away many candidates. “There are so many financial incentives offered by Louisiana, New York, Canada and New Zealand,” Kelly said. “That’s the big issue; people are choosing to film outside California.” Other panelists addressed film issues from their own perspectives. Bryan Unger, Western executive director of the Directors Guild of America, spoke about competition from other states and countries, and Amy Lemisch, director of the California Film Commission, addressed how cities can present themselves as production-friendly. “At the end of the day, it really is not about glamour or movie stars; it’s about the people behind the scenes you never see on screen,” Kelly said. Judy O’Rourke, (661) 257-5255 judy.orourke@dailynews.com 160Want local news?Sign up for the Localist and stay informed Something went wrong. Please try again.subscribeCongratulations! You’re all set!last_img read more

Voters line up with Ohio ag organization endorsements

first_imgShare Facebook Twitter Google + LinkedIn Pinterest Election results are in for 2015. Ohio Issues 1 and 2 have passed while Issue 3 has failed, with nearly two-thirds of voters saying no to 3.The Ohio Farm Bureau, the Ohio Cattlemen’s Association and the Ohio AgriBusiness Association have all chosen to support Issues 1 and 2, and oppose Issue 3. Each issue has implications for Ohio’s rural and agricultural communities and should be carefully considered by voters.Here is more on each issue as summarized by the Ohio AgriBusiness Association (OABA).Issue 1Currently, Ohio House and Senate District lines are drawn by a combination of the governor, auditor and secretary of state with input from legislative leaders. This process has led to a vast number of incongruently drawn districts with one-sided political support over the years that are no longer considered to be competitive in the general election.A “Yes” vote on Issue 1 would end this partisan process and restore fair and balanced standards for drawing state legislative districts that are more compact and politically competitive, while ensuring bipartisanship and transparency through the process.The amendment would establish the bipartisan Ohio Redistricting Commission, composed of seven members including the governor, state auditor, secretary of state and four members appointed by the majority and minority leaders of the General Assembly. The dealings of the commission would be done transparently, with required public meetings, display of maps and a public letter explaining any plan (including that none should favor a political party) the Commission adopts by a simple majority vote. The Commission would also be required to split as few counties, municipalities and townships as possible in the redrawing process.If passed, the amendment becomes effective immediately. There is no active or organized opposition. Issue 2A YES vote on State Issue 2 would protect Ohio’s Constitution from monopoly, oligopoly or cartel interests through a constitutional amendment prohibiting special interests from amending the constitution to guarantee financial profits for themselves through preferential tax rates or commercial rights or special economic privileges not available to similarly situated people or nonpublic agencies.A past issue, the effort to legalize gambling in Ohio in 2009, resulted in the establishment of constitutional protection for two companies to own all four current casinos in Ohio. Currently, State Issue 3, as written, would establish similar constitutional protection to 10 vertically integrated companies toward the legalization of marijuana in the state.A YES vote on State Issue 2 would ensure the constitution is used to benefit the broad public interest, and ensure it cannot be abused or corrupted by those interested in obtaining exclusive deals and special commercial benefits.“The constitution should be used to protect the fundamental rights of all individuals, not to guarantee the financial profits of a select few,” said Chris Henney, OABA president and CEO. “A yes vote would protect free commerce, fair trade and fair dealing in Ohio.”If passed, the proposal would prohibit any proposed constitutional amendment that appears on the Nov. 3, 2015 statewide ballot from creating a monopoly, oligopoly or cartel for the sale, distribution or other use of any federal Schedule I controlled substance, such as that outlined State Issue 3.The state legislature acted nearly unanimously to place Issue 2 on the ballot, and a growing consensus of trade groups and business leaders and editorial boards are lining up in support of Issue 2. Ohio would be the 20th state to adopt constitutional provisions banning monopolies.Issue 3A NO vote on Issue 3 would put a stop to a $1 billion marijuana monopoly granting a small group of wealthy investors exclusive rights to commercial production and sale of marijuana for recreational and medical purposes that would also insulate them from any business competition or act of the legislature.If passed, the amendment would grant exclusive rights for commercial marijuana growth and cultivation to 10 self-designated landowners, permit the retail sale of recreational marijuana at approximately 1,100 statewide locations, legalize the production of marijuana-infused products, and allow each person 21 years of age or older to purchase, grow, possess, use transport and share over one-half pound of marijuana at a time.While nearly 75% of registered voters, when polled, say they would support medicinal marijuana, Issue 3 goes well beyond medicinal purposes. It would create 10 grow sites, specifically laid out in the constitution to allow the growers to distribute the product and create approximately 1,100 retail locations across the state that would allow marijuana confections like cookies and lollipops to be sold, and allow an individual to grow up to four plants for personal use. The amendment also prohibits a local jurisdiction from exercising home rule.In addition to the concern that there would be more retail outlets for marijuana than there are current Starbucks or McDonalds locations in the state, there is concern that high limits of personal possession (the equivalent of up to 500 average-sized marijuana joints) and the legalization of confectionary products would result in broad exposure to children and underage students.To date, all support for Issue 3 is coming from the investors in the 10 grow facilities.last_img read more

College student competition aims to bring innovative ideas to dairy industry

first_imgShare Facebook Twitter Google + LinkedIn Pinterest By Chip TusonOne revolutionary idea can transform an entire industry overnight. At least, that’s what The Ohio State University SmartAg4.0 student competition posits to event participants. In much of the way Uber has changed how we commute and AirBnb has changed how we find accommodations, participants in SmartAg4.0 could have the next big idea to transform agriculture.“Agriculture is undergoing a significant transformation that rivals historical developments including mechanization, the ‘Green Revolution,’ or biotechnology,” said Scott Shearer, Professor and Chair at Ohio State’s Department of Food, Agricultural and Biological Engineering. “Most agricultural professionals now realize that connecting the farm to the internet (e.g., big data and data analytics) will drive sustainability and productivity of the ‘food systems’ of the future. SmartAg4.0 is designed to help students gain experience with turning ideas into new products or services that will reshape global agriculture.”SmartAg4.0 started in 2016 with the idea of offering a “hack-a-thon” style event to students in the College of Food, Agricultural and Environmental Sciences at Ohio State. The competition ended up drawing students of all disciplines from across the university to participate, and has continued to grow since its first year. SmartAg4.0 is now open to all undergraduate and graduate students enrolled in any Ohio college or university.Students form teams to compete in the 24-hour event where they conceptualize an idea to pitch to a panel of judges from academia and representatives from industry sponsors. This year, participants will focus their idea on one of four domain topics related to the dairy industry: sustainable nutrition, sensors and smart packaging, the internet of things, and blockchain.“Students need to begin thinking about how the Internet of Things can add value to all segments of the food system — production through consumer,” Shearer said. “We’re focusing on dairy this year because it’s importance to Ohio agriculture, existing labor shortages and emerging technologies (e.g., RFID, robotic milkers, robotic feeding systems and ultra high-temperature pasteurization).”Student participants are simply asked to bring an idea and a laptop or smart device to the event. From there, they network and meet fellow students and industry leaders to help spark innovation. After forming their teams, students work through the night and morning to get ready for their pitch.“Our world must start paying more attention to environmental issues, and newly developed applications can facilitate this process,” said John Conroy, an Operations Management and Public Management major at Ohio State. “With this in mind, I thought I could get some awesome ideas and meet like-minded individuals by participating in SmartAg4.0.”Conroy and his team designed a presented a wireframe app design for an app called “InStock” which would be used by stores and restaurants to manage product and better measure food waste. Other ideas from past years include a community garden service for cities, social networking apps for consumers to learn about the farms where their food comes from, and ways for consumers to more directly track nutrition. Some student teams have gone on to pursue their ideas beyond the competition and seek commercialization.“You can get so much out of an event that only takes a weekend,” Conroy said. “You learn to work with others on a time-sensitive project, you learn to critically analyze a concept and develop solutions, and you have the opportunity to present your idea in front of professionals who are excited to listen.” SmartAg4.0 2018 takes place September 28-29 on Ohio State’s Columbus campus. If you’re a current college student interested in participating in SmartAg4.0 or represent a company interested in sponsoring this event, please visit smartag4.osu.edu. Chip Tuson, Program Manager, Marketing & Communications can be reached at tuson.1@osu.edu. This column is provided by the OSU Department of Food, Agricultural and Biological Engineering, OSU Extension, Ohio Agricultural Research and Development Center, and the College of Food, Agricultural, and Environmental Sciences.last_img read more

Choosing an Air Conditioner

first_img RELATED ARTICLES Making decisionsA knowledgeable air conditioner salesperson should be able to help you pick out a quality room air conditioner. Insist on an Energy Star-listed model, ask about moisture removal, and then consider technical support, warranties, manufacturer reputation, and service in making your buying decision.With central air conditioners and heat pumps, talk with air conditioning contractors and suppliers, but be aware that specific contractors may push only those products they are most familiar with or manufacturers they represent. The latest mini-split air-source heat pumps from such manufacturers as Mitsubishi, Daikin, Panasonic, and Fujitsu offer—in my opinion—the best option available today.If the air conditioning contractor you contact doesn’t provide these systems, I would suggest that you seek out other contractors or suppliers before proceeding with a purchase. Moisture removal with air conditionersAll air conditioners remove moisture, as described in last week’s blog. While there are no federal requirements or measurement standards for moisture removal, most manufacturers list moisture removal in pints of water per hour. As a first step, you must properly size an air conditioner to achieve good moisture removal (see below). If humidity is a problem, look for models that are effective at moisture removal. Models with variable-speed motors are typically more effective at moisture removal.Discuss moisture removal with a dealer or air conditioning contractor. Your particular situation and humidity conditions may inform the product recommendations. Sizing air conditioners and heat pumpsParticularly with central air conditioners and heat pumps, sizing is key to successful performance. With an oversized unit, frequent on-off cycling will occur, efficiency will drop, and moisture removal will be poor. Sizing requires carrying out detailed cooling load calculations; it is not something that should be done using rules of thumb. The sizing of ducting with a central unit is also very important, both for efficient operation and noise control. SEER ratings for central air conditioners and heat pumpsCentral air conditioners and air-source heat pumps in cooling mode are typically rated on a seasonal bases using the seasonal energy efficiency rating (SEER). This is the total seasonal cooling output in Btus divided by the watt-hours of electricity consumption.Central air conditioners must have SEER ratings of 13.0 or higher; I don’t think there’s a minimum threshold for the cooling performance of heat pumps [see correction in comments below]. To qualify for the Energy Star standard, central air conditioners and air-source heat pumps both must have SEER ratings of 14.5 for split systems (separate indoor and outdoor components) or 14.0 for packaged units.The best central air conditioners and air-source heat pumps today have SEER ratings above 22. Room air conditioner efficiencies and performanceRoom air conditioner performance is reported as the Energy Efficiency Rating (EER), which is a measure of the energy output in Btus (British Thermal Units) per hour divided by the energy input in watts, assuming standard conditions (usually 95°F outside temperature and 50% relative humidity).Federally mandated efficiency requirements for room air conditioners vary depending on size, ranging from an EER of 8.5 for models over 20,000 Btu/hour to 9.8 for models in the 8,000 to 14,000 Btu/hour size. To meet the Energy Star standard in these size categories, the EER must be a minimum of 9.4 and 10.8, respectively. The thresholds are somewhat more relaxed for the smallest units.Today’s best room air conditioners have EERs over 11.5, but relatively few exceed 10.8.center_img Air Conditioner BasicsCalculating Cooling LoadsWindow-Mounted Air Conditioners Save Energy Alex is founder of BuildingGreen, Inc. and executive editor of Environmental Building News. He also coauthored BuildingGreen’s special report on windows that just came out. To keep up with Alex’s latest articles and musings, you can sign up for his Twitter feed. For whole-house cooling, central air conditioners or heat pumps are used, and chilled air is distributed through ducts. Heat pumps offer the advantage of being able to provide both cooling and heating—by reversing the refrigerant cycle seasonally. If I were putting in an air conditioning system and my budget allowed, I would install one of the new-generation mini-split air-source heat pumps. (Very significant for those of us in the Northeast, the cost of delivered heat from these heat pumps is usually lower than that of oil.) [Author’s note: Some modifications have been made since this blog was originally posted.]I have never owned an air conditioner, and I don’t have any immediate plans to change that. But if I did, what would I look for?For only occasional use and when you don’t want to spend more than $1,000, the options are limited to room air conditioners, which are most commonly installed in windows. These cool the rooms in which they are installed, though in a small house or one that’s very-well-insulated and tight, a single window unit may be able to cool much of the house.Most room air conditioners are either installed in a double-hung window or in an opening in the wall specially created for the air conditioner. Special models are available that can be used in casement windows, though installation is trickier.Window air conditioners are usually installed in the late spring or summer and removed in the fall. Because they don’t seal tightly in the window, they should not be left in place during the winter months, as they will result in cold drafts. Room air conditioners that fit into custom openings through the wall may be left in place as long as they are fairly well-sealing (most are not), and if they are removed the opening should be carefully sealed for the winter.last_img read more

Fajardo shrugs off SMB’s first loss

first_imgTrending Articles PLAY LIST 00:50Trending Articles00:50Trending Articles01:02Fajardo predicts there will be no sweep in PBA Finals01:29Police teams find crossbows, bows in HK university01:35Panelo suggests discounted SEA Games tickets for students02:49Robredo: True leaders perform well despite having ‘uninspiring’ boss02:42PH underwater hockey team aims to make waves in SEA Games01:44Philippines marks anniversary of massacre with calls for justice01:19Fire erupts in Barangay Tatalon in Quezon City Brace for potentially devastating typhoon approaching PH – NDRRMC 2 ‘newbie’ drug pushers fall in Lucena sting John Lloyd Cruz a dashing guest at Vhong Navarro’s wedding WADA probes possible flaw in test bottles Read Next LATEST STORIES PBA IMAGESWith Ginebra’s Jervy Cruz and Raymond Aguilar stepping up, June Mar Fajardo admitted that the unheralded bruisers’ performance against San Miguel on Sunday was further proof of how strong the Gin Kings are.“We know how good they are. They’re a championship-contender team and they made good adjustments in the second half,” Fajardo said in Filipino.ADVERTISEMENT Slow and steady hope for near-extinct Bangladesh tortoises NEXT BLOCK ASIA 2.0 introduces GURUS AWARDS to recognize and reward industry influencerscenter_img Globe Business launches leading cloud-enabled and hardware-agnostic conferencing platform in PH Kammuri turning to super typhoon less likely but possible — Pagasa Don’t miss out on the latest news and information. Typhoon Kammuri accelerates, gains strength en route to PH Sans lead big man Greg Slaughter, Cruz and Aguilar combined for 33 points and nine rebounds in the Gin Kings’ 100-96 victory over the Beermen.Fajardo tried his best to keep San Miguel afloat but failed to rescue the Beermen despite his mammoth stat line of 33 points, 11 rebounds, four assists, and four steals.FEATURED STORIESSPORTSWATCH: Drones light up sky in final leg of SEA Games torch runSPORTSLillard, Anthony lead Blazers over ThunderSPORTSMalditas save PH from shutoutBut rather than feel down with the loss, the reigning four-time PBA MVP sees the first defeat of the 2018 PBA Philippine Cup as a reality check of sorts.“It happens. We can’t win all of our games. So we have to move on and learn from our lapses,” he said as he rued the Beermen’s 18 turnovers in the matchup. San Miguel still sits atop the standings at 5-1, but the Cebuano giant knows that his squad can’t be complacent as it seeks to bounce back on Sunday against red-hot Magnolia.”It’s a good thing that it happened to us midway through the conference, so we still have time to adjust. But we need to move on and win our remaining games,” he said. MOST READ View commentslast_img read more