4 Tips for Subject Lines That Work

first_imgBefore: Take the Farm Friends SurveyAfter: Farm Friends Asks: What’s Your Fantasy Meal? Subject lines are more important than you might think. On average, at least 100 emails flood your constituents’ inboxes every single day. That’s a lot of digital noise to shout over, which is why your email subject lines need as much TLC as the content inside. Here’s a simple, four-step makeover to help transform your subject lines from ho-hum to “Oh, wow!” 1. State the ObviousDon’t dance around the point of your email. Talk straight to your recipients about what they’ll find inside. You can be creative and pique curiosity, but for best results, make sure you answer the question, “What’s this email about?” If you make readers think too hard, they may just opt to delete without reading and move on to their next message. For newsletters, highlight the key piece of content you’re sending—a subject line like “Fall 2013 Newsletter” is easy to gloss over in a busy inbox.Before: All the news that’s fit to emailAfter: The Top 10 Women in Science 4. Keep It ShortMake every word count. After you’ve written your subject line, go back and delete words or phrases that don’t add value. Ideally, stick with around 50 characters or less. Some studies have found that the 28- to 39-character range is the sweet spot for maximum open rates.Before: Final reminder to make reservations to attend the Strutting Dog Gala on October 15, 2013!After: Strutting Dog Gala: Last day to RSVP! 3. Avoid the Spam TrapWhy bother with killer content if your subject line gets it caught in the spam filter? Keep your message front and center by avoiding things like cute symbols and special characters—spam filter magnets that attract the wrong kind of attention. Subject lines containing the words help, RE, or FWD are often interpreted as scams.Before: ♥♥♥You will LOVE these PREMIUM GIFTS for your donation!!!♥♥♥After: Cool donor gifts from Heart Healthy Houston! 2. Stand Out from the Crowd In a sea of emails, it helps to be a little different. Add a touch of visual interest with brackets, quotes, a smidge (just a smidge) of all caps, or an exclamation point (just one!). Personalize your subject line with the recipient’s city or state, which typically generate higher open rates than first or last names. Instead of telling people what’s inside, try asking a question that piques their curiosity.Before: SafeSurf loves its volunteersAfter: SafeSurf LOVES its volunteers! Before: Hot dog! Get down and boogie with your beagle!After: Join Long Island Pet Rescue’s Fall Frolic Before: RE: Help a veteran find a homeAfter Homes for Heroes Fall Fundraiser wants you! Revamping your subject lines with these simple tips can make a big difference in your email open rates. You might even see a boost in constituent engagement and giving!Don’t forget:Your email subject lines can show how much you respect your constituents’ busy schedules by telling them exactly what they’ll find inside.It’s okay to add a little visual interest to your subject line, just don’t overdo it and catch the eye of the spam filter instead.Short and sweet is best when it comes to subject lines. Always try to keep them under 50 characters. Before: Books for Kids is Coming to your neighborhoodAfter: Books for Kids is Coming to Newport!last_img read more

4 ways to create a culture of giving at your nonprofit

first_imgThe following post is a summary of Adam Grant’s presentation on his book Give and Take: A Revolutionary Approach to Success at the Conference on Volunteering and Service.In Give and Take, Adam Grant’s premise is that there is more to the secret of success than hard work, talent and luck – especially as the world continues to become more hyper-connected. What’s missing is generosity. Givers excel in a collaborative work environment, but can burn out easily if they don’t see the impact of their contributions or don’t learn how to set boundaries. This is especially true for people in helping professions such as nonprofit leadership, cause marketing and social responsibility.Here are Adam’s 4 tips for creating a cultures of successful givers at your organization.1. Get the right people on the bus (a nod to Jim Collins)Weed out the takers and encourage matches to take their cues from the givers. Rewarding giver behavior and helping matchers see the value in reciprocity with a net positive benefit will nudge your culture towards a collaborative, generous workplace.2. Reduce costsThink about the power of 5-minute favors. You don’t have to be Mother Theresa or Gandhi to call yourself a giver. Giver mentality is more about finding efficient ways to make low-cost gestures with high value to the receiver. You’ve heard of micro-volunteering? Think of it as micro-favors. If someone asks you for help and you know you are the best equipped to help and the act will only take you 5 minutes, say yes. Always. If you are not the best equipped to respond, point the person in a new direction to find the help they need.3. Show impactSome givers burn out others are energized by doing favors – why? Givers burn out when they can’t see the value of their impact. Think of ways to have authentic messengers demonstrate the value your staff creates every day. A message from the CEO is nice, but givers are more motivated by a thank you from a program beneficiary or an employee who gave in a personally meaningful way. Showing impact in a tangible way relates to the concept of the ‘identifiable victim’ or ‘singularity effect’ – people are more compassionate when they can relate to one person’s story.4. Encourage help-seekingA whopping 75-90% of helping starts with a request, yet people hesitate to ask for help – especially givers. Givers don’t want to be a burden and often confuse taking and receiving. We need to create work cultures that reward asking for help and make it ok for people to take it. Also, givers to ask for help so other people (namely matchers) have the opportunity to give and so givers know who can benefit from their help and how in the future.Here’s an example of how help-seeking improves results. Appletree Answers, a call center solutions provider, was experiencing 98% staff turnover each year. That’s a huge HR hiring burden to replace your staff every year. The company started internal employee wish program where employees could ask for help fulfilling their dreams and other employees could offer assistance to making those wishes come true. As a result of creating this culture of giving and receiving, staff turnover dropped to 33%.Your organization can create its own Reciprocity Ring. Here’s how.· Invite employees to join the program.· Have everyone participating make a request.· Everyone in the program then tries to help make those requests happen.· Everyone is both a giver and a receiver, so there is no stigma about asking for help.· Everyone gets better understanding of the resources in their network for future giving and receiving. by Kate Olsen, VP of Strategic Projects at Network for Good @Kate4Goodlast_img read more

United Nations General Assembly: A Pledge for Every Woman, Every Child

first_imgPosted on September 26, 2012Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to email this to a friend (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window)Today, the Kaiser Daily Global Health Policy Report provided a brief summary of the focus on women and children at the United Nations General Assembly. The summary highlights a number of news publications that report on the discussions about the health and well-being of women from the General Assembly.One of the featured articles, A pledge for every woman, every child, was published this morning on devex. The article describes announcements for new money to protect women and children from sexual violence as well as a new funding mechanism for maternal and child health.From the article:World Bank President Jim Yong Kim, meanwhile, announced a new special funding mechanism aimed at boosting financial support for the fourth and fifth Millennium Development Goals at the Every Woman, Every Child event.The mechanism would enable donors to scale up funding for maternal and child health. Details, however, have yet to be fleshed out.“We will be talking with our IDA shareholders and other interested donors and partners in the coming weeks to agree on the best way to do this, together,” Kim said, who also identified the bank’s work to achieve “better outcomes” for money spent on health: increasing focus on maternal health, designing innovative programs linking financing to results, and helping countries put in place strong health systems.Read the full story here.Share this: ShareEmailPrint To learn more, read:last_img read more

Resource Tool: Human Resources for Health

first_imgPosted on July 17, 2014November 2, 2016By: Katie Millar, Technical Writer, Women and Health Initiative, Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public HealthClick to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to email this to a friend (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window)This post is part of our “Supporting the Human in Human Resources” blog series co-hosted by the Maternal Health Task Force and Jacaranda Health.To enrich the “Supporting the Human in Human Resources” blog series, a round-up of recent literature on the subject is here aggregated as a useful tool for public health practitioners. Let us know how these articles are helpful and about other human resource topics that interest you.Landmark articles:Systematic Review on Human Resources for Health Interventions to Improve Maternal Health Outcomes: Evidence from Developing CountriesHUMAN RESOURCES FOR HEALTH: foundation for Universal Health Coverage and the post-2015 development agendaHuman resources for maternal, newborn and child health: from measurement and planning to performance for improved health outcomesHuman resources for maternal health: multi-purpose or specialists?Recent Publications:Time to address gender discrimination and inequality in the health workforceFactors affecting motivation and retention of primary health care workers in three disparate regions in KenyaTask-shifting and prioritization: a situational analysis examining the role and experiences of community health workers in MalawiHRM and its effect on employee, organizational and financial outcomes in health care organizationsHope and despair: community health assistants’ experiences of working in a rural district in ZambiaReaching Mothers and Babies with Early Postnatal Home Visits: The Implementation Realities of Achieving High Coverage in Large-Scale ProgramsCommunity Health Workers in Low-, Middle-, and High-Income Countries: An Overview of Their History, Recent Evolution, and Current EffectivenessHome visits by community health workers to prevent neonatal deaths in developing countries: a systematic reviewExpansion in the private sector provision of institutional delivery services and horizontal equity: evidence from Nepal and BangladeshPerformance-based incentives to improve health status of mothers and newborns: what does the evidence show?Building capacity to develop an African teaching platform on health workforce development: a collaborative initiative of universities from four sub Saharan countriesRetention of female volunteer community health workers in Dhaka urban slums: a prospective cohort studyShare this: ShareEmailPrint To learn more, read:last_img read more

Jobs and Scholarships in Maternal Health

first_imgPosted on December 5, 2014December 3, 2015Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to email this to a friend (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window)Check out the following opportunities in Maternal HealthJobsResearch Fellow in Qualitative Methods for Impact Evaluation, London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine, Deadline: Thursday, December, 18thResearch Fellow in Epidemiological Methods for Impact Evaluation, London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine, Deadline: Thursday, December, 18thSenior Program Officer, Program Advocacy and Communications for Family Planning, Bill & Melinda Gates FoundationMonitoring and Evaluation Officer, PATH (based in South Africa)Communications Associate, Mobile Alliance for Maternal ActionProject Director for Fistula Care Plus, EngenderHealth ShareEmailPrint To learn more, read: Urban Health Conference ScholarshipSpecial Call for RMNCH Submissions for 12th International Conference on Urban Health, March 8-12, Dhaka, Bangladesh. Deadline: Friday, January 9th, 2015Scholarships are available for applicants from developing countries whose abstracts are accepted for presentationAreas of special interest include addressing disparities in access to maternal, newborn, and child health services, quality of services, and programs that target youth sexual and reproductive health behaviors to prevent unintended pregnancy. Abstracts that address reproductive, maternal, neonatal and child health (RMNCH) in the urban environment, especially approaches that target poor women and women living in slums are encouraged.Questions? Contact Dr. Selmin Jahan, selmin@eminence-bd.orgSubmit your abstract at www.icuh2015.orgShare this:last_img read more

3 Steps to Getting Corporate Sponsors for Your Event

first_imgFundraising events take a fair amount of money to produce, and it’s easy to spend more money on the event that it actually raises. There are a number of ways to keep this from happening (like setting a realistic budget and fundraising goal and having a data-backed plan to boost donations), but one of the most efficient ways to ensure your event is a net financial gain is through corporate sponsorships.So, how do you get corporate sponsors to support your event?Step 1: Identify prospects.To start, ask yourself: which companies should be targeted as sponsors? Ideally, you’d like sponsors that fit well with your mission, and whose target markets overlap the demographics of your guests. In other words, the people attending your event would also be likely to support your sponsors.Leverage your board’s personal networks and see if anyone has any connections that might be a good fit. Ask board members if they’d be willing to contact these companies directly, by signing the proposal letter and making a follow-up phone call after it’s been sent.Another method of finding potential sponsors is looking at your competitors. Which companies are sponsoring their events? Who are the competitors of those companies? It helps to check out event pages and websites to find out what kind of publicity your competitors are giving their sponsors.Step 2: Find out what matters to them.If you want to win over a sponsor, you need to speak their language. Formulate your approach with one question in mind: What’s in it for the sponsor?A corporate sponsor is looking for benefits like a new business, more customers, a halo effect with their customer base to encourage brand loyalty or visibility. When you approach prospective sponsors, listen more than you talk, and ask them about their goals and priorities. Then, show how it’s a big benefit to them to be in front of your audience.Chris Baylis at www.sponsorshipcollective.com has five great questions to ask potential sponsor:Who is your target audience?How do you normally engage in sponsorship?What does your target market value?What are your sales goals for the coming year?What would you consider to be the most important elements of a sponsorship proposal?While you’re communicating with various organizations, make sure you’re tracking your interactions. Use your donor management system to create an organization record for every company you approach. If you can’t easily track organizations in your current donor database, talk to us about switching to a system that gives you the option to make a company record.Step 3: Make them a winning offer.With all this background information, you’re ready to formulate a compelling proposal. First things first, your job is to sell the benefit to the sponsor. The cost of that benefit is your sponsorship package. Think of this way:Event Package + Promotional Package + Donation = Sponsorship PackageThat means you should lead with “Here’s what we can do for you – let’s make this win-win happen together,” not “Here’s our sponsorship package – please support us.” You need to demonstrate the value to them.So, how much should you actually charge your sponsors? A lot of it will depend on what you learn from your conversation with them. Also, get to know the market by looking at the competition. What do similar organizations in your region charge?Then, consider your own event. How many people will be attending your event? What kind of exposure can you offer for your sponsors? The answers to all of these questions can help you come up with a fair dollar amount.As you’re working to win over your sponsor, make sure you’re clear on what their role will be. It’s critical to establish clear parameters that are ethical and appropriate from the start.Once your sponsors have agreed to support you, follow-up with a contract – and create a plan to make you both successful. Involve the sponsor in planning and promotion so they feel like an integral part of your event – and so your event feels like part of their overall outreach strategy. The deeper the thought you put into the partnership, the deeper the partnership will be.Not only are corporate sponsors great partners for funding your event, but they lend your event more reach and recognition within your network. Knowing that a well-reputed business supports your cause gives your organization legitimacy in the eyes of a potential attendee or donor. Take advantage of this strategy for the long-term with your organization. Your sponsor’s for-profit savvy and business sense can be a powerful tool beyond your upcoming event.last_img read more

Family Planning and Maternal Health: Four Takeaways From the 2016 International Conference on Family Planning

first_imgPosted on February 26, 2016October 12, 2016By: Jacquelyn Caglia, Deputy Director of Administration & Operations, Women and Health Initiative, Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public HealthClick to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to email this to a friend (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window)The 2016 International Conference on Family Planning, convened in Nusa Dua, Indonesia in late January, brought together more than 3,000 researchers, practitioners, policymakers, donors, and advocates. If you weren’t able to participate, here are four important takeaways those of us working in maternal health need to know.Family planning and maternal health are inextricably linked, and our communities of practice must be too. Each day, more than 800 women die from preventable causes related to pregnancy and childbirth. Many of these deaths could be avoided if women had access to contraception to prevent unwanted pregnancy and increase the amount of time between pregnancies. Family planning must be an essential part of antenatal and postnatal care, and a conversation about contraception should be part of any clinical encounter with women of reproductive age.Various factors affect discontinuation of contraception. Nearly 30% of women who stop using contraception for reasons other than wanting to get pregnant cite concerns related to health service quality including lack of method choice, stock-outs, and ineffective referral systems. Quality matters across the reproductive, maternal, newborn and child health (RMNCH) continuum.Young adolescents bear the biggest burden of complications during pregnancy and childbirth, the second leading cause of death globally among girls aged 15-19. Delaying the age of first pregnancy would reduce maternal and newborn mortality as well as improve the health and well-being of young girls.Improved tracking is needed. USAID and UNFPA have called for a new indicator to be added to monitor progress towards Goal 3 of the Sustainable Development Goals, to ensure healthy lives and promote well-being for all ages. In the words of Ellen Starbird of USAID, the new measure – percent of demand satisfied by modern contraception – is “a measure of what women are doing, rather than what women should be doing.” ShareEmailPrint To learn more, read: To read more reflections from the 2016 International Conference on Family Planning, visit the ICFP2016 Crowd360 digital hub.Share this:last_img read more

Walking and hitching rides along Kashmirs desolate highways

first_imgSrinagar: Kashmir’s uncertain, restive situation has pushed public transport off the roads, leaving many people with no option but to flag down the odd private vehicle passing through the desolate highways of the Valley.A few people, some in twos and threes and some alone, can be seen walking or standing by the side hoping to get a ride into the nearest town or village — to meet their children, parents or maybe just get back home. On Monday, the Centre announced the revocation of Jammu and Kashmir’s special status in the Rajya Sabha and also its proposal to bifurcate the state into the union territories of Jammu and Kashmir, and Ladakh. Also Read – Uddhav bats for ‘Sena CM’The Valley has been under a virtual communications blackout since the night before with few workable phones, mobile or landline, and virtually no internet connections. Prohibitory orders are in place with authorities saying there is no curfew. And the desperation of people, who said they are trapped and staying indoors is not always possible, is rising by the hour. Among those seen frantically trying to get a car to stop at Narbal Road on the outskirts of Srinagar was Nighat Nasir. Also Read – Farooq demands unconditional release of all detainees in J&K”I have to reach Baramulla (about 60 km away) and be there with my children,” she said. The couple started walking from their Srinagar home till they reached Narbal Road, a distance of 17 km. Their efforts paid off and they finally managed to hop on to an ambulance that promised to take them halfway to Pattan in north Kashmir. Mohammed Ramzan, now admitted in a hospital in Bemina on the outskirts of Srinagar, didn’t stop to wait for a lift. The resident of Srinagar’s Lal Bazar locality got a distress call from his daughter on Sunday night in Budgam in central Kashmir and left his home early after daybreak on Monday morning. Budgam is about 35 km from Srinagar. With no buses or taxis, he walked for 12 km before collapsing in sheer exhaustion. “Ramzan collapsed and was picked by a security vehicle and brought to the hospital,” said Dr Shafkat Bhat at the Bemina hospital. The stories are many. Mohammed Shahim said he took a lift from three different people to cover the 65 km distance from Khrew in south Kashmir to Srinagar. “Is there a curfew? Why can’t we go to any place? We are not creating any disturbance then why are we being troubled,” he asked a paramilitary trooper guarding a road leading to Batmaloo in the city. “I managed to reach from Khrew after taking a lift from three different people. I covered 65 kilometres and now they are not allowing me to go inside my locality,” Shahim, who works in private factory, said. He was allowed in after a senior officer intervened. “These are difficult times, kindly bear with us,” the officer told Shahim and requested people not to take pictures from their mobiles. Riyaz Rather, who stays in downtown Srinagar but runs a medical shop in the Civil Lines area, said covering the 10 km distance is an everyday challenge. “Someone or the other gives a lift and this is how we cover the distance these days. The government is telling us that there is no curfew but police did not allow me to take out my vehicle,” Rather said He has been commuting all these days from his home on foot. “Once I cross downtown, someone or else gives me a lift and that’s how I reach,” he said. PTIlast_img read more

BC judge approves Victorias plastic bag bylaw going into effect in July

first_imgVICTORIA – The mayor of Victoria is hailing a court victory allowing the city to enact a bylaw that will prohibit grocery stores from offering or selling plastic bags to shoppers.Lisa Helps says in a news release that the B.C. Supreme Court decision represents an important step in moving away from unsustainable business practices that create high volumes of waste from single-use plastic bags.The Canadian Plastic Bag Association challenged the bylaw, saying it amounts to an environmental regulation that the city does not have the power to enact without provincial approval.Justice Nathan Smith says the bylaw is characterized as a business regulation and even though some councillors may have been motivated by broad concerns for the environment, they were considering ways in which discarded plastic bags impact municipal facilities and services.The bylaw that goes into effect in July calls on businesses to charge customers 15 cents for a paper bag and $1 for a reusable bag, but small paper bags used for items such as bulk foods, meat, bakery goods and plants would still be free.Fees will increase in July 2019 to 25 cents for a paper bag and $2 for a reusable bag.Note to readers: This is a corrected story. A previous version said the fees increase in January 2019.last_img read more

Seoul cancels permit for new Japanese embassy building

first_imgSeoul: Authorities in Seoul have cancelled the permit for a new Japanese embassy building citing construction delays, local officials said Wednesday, with relations between South Korea and Tokyo strained by historical disputes. The neighbours are both democracies, market economies and US allies faced with an increasingly assertive China and the long-running threat of nuclear-armed North Korea. But their own ties have remained icy for years due to bitter rows stemming from Japan’s brutal 1910-45 colonial rule of the Korean peninsula, with forced labour and wartime sex slavery key examples. Also Read – Saudi Crown Prince ‘snubbed’ Pak PM, recalled jet from USA statue of a “comfort woman” symbolising the Korean women forced to work in Japanese military brothels mostly during World War II stands across the road from the embassy plot. Since 1992 campaigners have held weekly rallies at the site to demand a “full, heartfelt apology” for wartime sex slavery from Tokyo. The 1,382th such gathering took place Wednesday, with activists surrounding the statue. The previous embassy building was demolished some years ago, with staff moving into offices in the neighbouring high-rises, and the plot is now a patch of bare earth behind a high wall, vines growing through the surrounding barbed wire. Also Read – Record number of 35 candidates in fray for SL Presidential pollsCity authorities gave permission for a new six-storey building in 2015, the year Seoul and Tokyo signed a controversial deal to settle the wartime sex slavery issue. But construction — which under South Korean law must start within a year of a permit being received — was repeatedly delayed. Japan argues that the “comfort women” statue is against the 2015 bilateral agreement, under which Tokyo offered an apology and a one-billion yen payment. But South Korean President Moon Jae-in said last year that the deal had been signed by his ousted predecessor Park Geun-hye without consulting the Korean victims and disbanded a foundation set up with the Japanese funds. An official at the Jongno Ward Office in Seoul said: “We had a meeting with Japanese officials in February, and they said they will accept the revocation of the permit as they cannot start the construction work due to circumstances in their home country.”last_img read more