Must-know Neuro-Nudges for Nonprofits

first_imgNetwork for Good is hosting a free webinar this Thursday, March 14 at 1 p.m. ET on neuromarketing – a topic definitely worth your time!The urge to help and give is hard-wired into the human brain. As a champion for a cause, it’s your task to tap into those recesses by appealing to that urge. The simplest things – images, words, gestures, even type fonts – can have a major effect on the potency of your message. Neuromarketing expert, Roger Dooley, has discovered some brain-science-based tweaks you can make to your print, web, and in-person outreach that will boost the effectiveness of your marketing efforts. Join Roger Dooley for this free event as he makes neuromarketing easy for nonprofits. Register here.last_img read more

Hey Girl, I See What Your Nonprofit Is Doing

first_imgBy tapping into the #tigerblood hashtag, Zachary reported that tons of media outlets picked up on the story, resulting in a modest increase in blood donations.So what’s in it for you? Why should you consider making a meme? 1. Sure, memes can be just plain silly and fun, and but they can also humanize your nonprofit’s public image. Who doesn’t love an organization that embraces its humanity and sense of humor? 2. Memes can create connections and start conversations because of their two-prong premise: A meme is based on an aspect of popular culture and spread from person to person. 3. Memes give supporters an easy way to publicize and promote your cause. Once you create a meme, fans can quickly share it over email, social media, and their own websites.Want to create your own nonprofit meme to help build buzz for your cause? Check out our tips on using memes to spread your nonprofit’s message. (Image credit: National Wildlife Federation, Source: Avi Kaplan) You’ve seen them all over Facebook, YouTube, Tumblr, and Pinterest: grumpycats,talking babies, even Ryan Gosling. Entertaining memes have exploded across the Internet. But have you also noticed an uptick in charitable memes, memes that are doing good? Many nonprofits are capitalizing on the popularity of memes to gain visibility and connect with new supporters.Nonprofits aren’t always great at piggybacking on the work of others, but that’s the key for a meme to take off. Senior Strategist Avi Kaplan of RAD Campaign has compiled some tip-top examples of nonprofit memes that worked because they borrowed a cultural phenomena, as did tech writer Zachary Sniderman.One of the best examples of nonprofit meme-jacking came from a 132-year-old organization, the American Red Cross. Capitalizing on Charlie Sheen’s 2011 outburst and proclamation to have drank tiger’s blood, the American Red Cross tweeted:We may not collect #tigerblood, but we know our donors & volunteers have fierce passion for doing good! #RedCrossMonth— American Red Cross (@RedCross)last_img read more

The PartoPen: Working to Increase the Effectiveness of the Partograph

first_imgPosted on August 10, 2012Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to email this to a friend (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window)Our colleagues at Maternova recently highlighted on their innovation index a new tool (that is currently in development) that aims to increase the effectiveness of the partograph. The PartoPen is being developed by University of Colorado-Boulder Ph.D candidate Heather Underwood.According to Maternova’s innovation index:Using an infrared camera, the pen takes picture of dots that are pre-printed on the paper that act as GPS coordinates for the pen. The pen provides real-time feedback for:     · Decision support: Based on location of the pen on graph, the pen will provide next steps     · Reminders: Auto-reminders of time and procedure     · Error Checking: ex. Recording a temperature in F vs. C, pen recognizes the errorThe digital partograph system provides real-time data feedback and reinforces birth attendant training, while retaining the paper-and-pen interface currently used by most healthcare workers. The system is currently being evaluated in Kenya.This project received a $100,000 Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation grant to develop and implement the technology.Learn more about this new tool from Maternova here.More information:Visit the PartoPen site.Access several documents about the partograph in the MHTF Library. (Just enter “partograph” in the search box!)Read a number of blog posts about the partograph on the MHTF Blog.Share this: ShareEmailPrint To learn more, read:last_img read more

Join the Live Webcast for Putting Mothers and Babies First

first_imgPosted on February 18, 2015August 10, 2016Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to email this to a friend (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window)Thursday, February 26, 2015, 12:30-1:30pm ESTThe Leadership Studio, 10th Floor Kresge Building, 677 Huntington Ave., BostonJoin us with The Forum at the Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health for Putting Mothers and Babies First: Benefits across a lifetime – a panel discussion presented in collaboration with The GroundTruth Project and GlobalPost.One of the smartest investments a society can make is to foster the health and education of its mothers. Healthy mothers raise healthier children, which boosts the productivity and stability of communities and economies. Yet, maternal mortality remains a terrible and disproportionate reality, particularly in developing countries, where 99 percent of all maternal deaths occur. These deaths put the lives of infants and older children at risk. Traditional approaches address the needs of mothers and children separately, but growing efforts are breaking down those silos — embracing the continuum of mother and child health in the hopes of providing more effective care and resources. The hoped-for result? Health benefits to mothers, children and their families across their lifetimes.This Forum event will explore how to achieve those benefits, including providing basic care such as vaccinations, and how societies stand to thrive as a result. The panel will be moderated by Marissa Miley, Deputy Editor of Global Health for The GroundTruth Project, and includes the following experts:Ana Langer: Professor of the Practice of Public Health and Director of the Women and Health Initiative and Maternal Health Task Force, Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public HealthAlicia Yamin: Director, Program on Health Rights of Women and Children, François-Xavier Bagnoud Center for Health and Human Rights, Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public HealthJoy Riggs-Perla: Director, Saving Newborn Lives, Save the ChildrenKirsten Gagnaire: Executive Director of the Mobile Alliance for Maternal ActionTune in for the live webcast by visiting the The Forum event page. Also follow and join the conversation by using #mothersbabiesfirst and following @ForumHSPH and @MHTF on Twitter.E-mail questions for the expert participants any time before or during the live webcast to theforum@hsph.harvard.edu, the Community Discussion page, or Tweet them to @ForumHSPH using #mothersbabiesfirst.Share this: ShareEmailPrint To learn more, read:last_img read more

Patients receiving individual doses and conventional breast radiation experience similar side effects

first_imgReviewed by James Ives, M.Psych. (Editor)Oct 30 2018In a 10-year study of women who received radiation therapy to treat early-stage breast cancer, those receiving fewer, larger individual doses experienced similarly low rates of late-onset side effects as those undergoing conventional radiation therapy. Findings from the multi-institutional U.K. FAST clinical trial were presented last week at the 60th Annual Meeting of the American Society for Radiation Oncology (ASTRO).”This study says it’s possible to find a regimen that would allow early-stage breast cancer patients to be treated only once a week over five weeks rather than daily over the same time period,” said Murray Brunt, MD, a professor of clinical oncology at University Hospitals of North Midlands and Keele University in the U.K., and lead author of this study. “Findings should help doctors discuss risks and benefits with their patients for various courses of radiation therapy and inform shared decision-making between physicians and patients.”The study is a long-term report of the FAST (FASTer Radiotherapy for breast cancer patients) trial, which was designed to assess changes in healthy breast tissue following conventional radiation treatment compared with two shorter regimens that delivered higher doses of radiation in fewer sessions. The trial, led by The Institute of Cancer Research, London, enrolled 915 women with early-stage invasive breast cancer at 18 centers across the U.K. from 2004 to 2007.Initial trial results of the FAST trial,”These results support treatment options that are more convenient for patients, resulting in fewer hospital visits and less expensive health services, without increasing the risk of long-term side effects,” added Joanne Haviland at The Institute of Cancer Research, London, and the study’s senior statistician.Patients in the trial were randomly assigned to one of three regimens of whole-breast radiation therapy following breast-conserving surgery: conventional treatment with 50 Gray (Gy) of radiation delivered in 25 daily, 2 Gy fractions delivered over five weeks; or hypofractionated treatment with one of two doses: 30 Gy delivered in five, once-weekly fractions of 6 Gy each, or 28.5 Gy delivered in five, once-weekly fractions of 5.7 Gy each. After treatment, patients were evaluated annually for effects to healthy breast tissue including skin reactions, hardening of the breast and changes in breast conformation and size.Rates of moderate or severe long-term effects to normal tissue were low across all treatment groups. Severe effects were observed in 13 of the 774 women (1.7 percent) with follow-up data at five years, and nine of the 392 women (2.3 percent) with follow-up data at 10 years. No changes or minor changes in normal tissue were observed in 88 and 86 percent of women at the five- and 10-year marks, respectively.Late normal tissue effects were not statistically different between the conventional therapy group and the five-fraction 28.5 Gy group at five years or 10 years following treatment. Moderate/severe late effects to normal breast tissue were higher, however, for patients who received the five-fraction, 30-Gy regimen. These patients were two to three times more likely to experience moderate/severe instances of breast shrinkage (p<0.001), hardness (p=0.004), fluid build-up (p<0.001) and spider veins (p=0.02).Related StoriesHow cell-free DNA can be targeted to prevent spread of tumorsLiving with advanced breast cancerBacteria in the birth canal linked to lower risk of ovarian cancerAmong patients on the conventional, daily-fraction arm, physicians observed normal tissue effects in 7.5 percent at five years and 9.1 percent at 10 years. By comparison, rates for the five-fraction 30-Gy arm were 18.0 percent at five years (p<0.001) and 18.4 percent at 10 years (p=0.04)."The profile of adverse effects to normal breast tissue was similar between the 28.5 Gy and 50 Gy groups, but rates were higher after 30 Gy given in five fractions over five weeks," said Prof. Brunt. "This disparity is rooted in differences between the two regimens in fractionation sensitivity. The sensitivity of 30 Gy delivered in five fractions over five weeks was equivalent to a total radiation dose of 57.3 Gy in 2 Gy fractions, while 28.5 Gy delivered in five fractions over five weeks was roughly the same as 52.5 Gy in 2 Gy fractions." Calculation suggests that 27.75 Gy delivered in five fractions over five weeks would be equivalent to 50 Gy in 25 fractions over five weeks.Researchers also assessed how the early-stage invasive breast tumors responded to surgery and radiation. The 10-year local relapse rate for all patients in the trial was 1.3 percent (95% CI 0.7, 2.3), with only 10 events reported in total, balanced between the treatment groups. The trial was not designed to test differences in relapse rates between treatment groups.Following these results, the research team is now investigating radiation therapy with five fractions delivered over five consecutive days. "As a next step, we want to investigate shortening the radiation therapy schedule to one week," explained Prof. Brunt. "A schedule like this would have significant clinical and practical implications, such as allowing radiation therapy to be integrated more closely with surgery and other therapies."Despite FAST and similar trials supporting the use of accelerated radiation treatment for breast cancer, large numbers of eligible patients in the U.S. are not receiving, and likely not being offered, shorter courses of radiation therapy. A 2013 JAMA study found an adoption rate of approximately 30 percent in the U.S., and a 2017 analysis for Kaiser Health News indicated that fewer than half of patients over age 50 with early-stage disease receive the accelerated treatment. The current ASTRO clinical guideline for whole breast radiation therapy, which was issued earlier this year, recommends hypofractionated therapy for breast cancer patients regardless of age, tumor stage and whether they have received chemotherapy.Source: https://www.astro.org/News-and-Publications/News-and-Media-Center/News-Releases/2018/Long-term-side-effects-similarly-low-for-once-weeklast_img read more

Researchers discover possible path forward in preventing cancers tied to two viruses

first_imgReviewed by Kate Anderton, B.Sc. (Editor)Nov 12 2018Researchers from the University of Minnesota, the Howard Hughes Medical Institute, and the University of Toronto have discovered a possible path forward in preventing the development of cancers tied to two viruses, including the virus that causes infectious mononucleosis–more commonly known as mono or the “kissing disease”–that infects millions of people around the globe each year.Published in Nature Microbiology, the research focuses on how the Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) and Kaposi’s sarcoma herpesvirus (KSHV) shield themselves from destruction inside the human body.”People infected with EBV or KSHV will have the virus for life,” said Adam Cheng, a Medical Scientist Training Program (MSTP) student at the University of Minnesota Medical School and lead author on the study. “In most cases, the virus will remain dormant. However, sometimes these viruses can reactivate and lead to abnormal, cancerous cell growth. But now, in the wake of our research, data suggests it may be possible to suppress the virus indefinitely.”Related StoriesMetabolic enzyme tied to obesity and fatty liver diseaseBacteria in the birth canal linked to lower risk of ovarian cancerHIV DNA persists in spinal fluid despite treatment, linked to cognitive impairmentUnder ideal conditions, a human DNA enzyme called APOBEC3B is capable of mutating and killing EBV and KSHV as it invades and replicates inside the body. However, researchers discovered that both viruses are able to produce defense proteins–BORF2 and ORF61, respectively–that bind directly to the APOBEC3B enzyme. In doing so, APOBEC3B is unable to mutate and kill the viral DNA and is directed away from sites of virus replication.”Our work suggests that by blocking the virus’s defense proteins, it may be possible to treat mono and prevent the development of cancers caused by EBV and KSHV,” said senior author Reuben Harris, Ph.D. “The viral defense proteins are excellent targets for drug development.”Researchers used CRISPR/Cas9-mediated genome engineering to delete the EBV’s defense protein. Through that process, the human APOBEC3B enzyme was able to mutate the virus, rendering it harmless and unable to replicate in cells.”We are already working hard to extend these results from cells to mice and other complex organisms,” said Harris. “The preliminary data are very promising and we hope to make great strides in future studies.””This is a great example of how an unbiased basic science experiment can lead to novel therapeutic opportunities. We could not have anticipated such an unusual role of BORF2 in disabling APOBEC3B and protecting EBV genomes,” said Lori Frappier, Ph.D., senior author on the study and professor at the University of Toronto. Source:https://twin-cities.umn.edu/news-events/research-brief-new-strategy-discovered-toward-possible-prevention-cancers-tied-monolast_img read more

Just one dose of glucose while on keto diet can damage blood

first_img Source:https://news.ok.ubc.ca/2019/03/27/on-the-keto-diet-ditch-the-cheat-day-says-ubc-study Reviewed by James Ives, M.Psych. (Editor)Mar 28 2019The often embraced ‘cheat day’ is a common theme in many diets and the popular ketogenic diet is no exception. But new research from UBC’s Okanagan campus says that just one 75-gram dose of glucose–the equivalent a large bottle of soda or a plate of fries–while on a high fat, low carbohydrate diet can lead to damaged blood vessels.”The ketogenic–or keto–diet has become very common for weight loss or to manage diseases like type 2 diabetes,” says Jonathan Little, associate professor in the School of Health and Exercise Sciences at UBCO and study senior author. “It consists of eating foods rich in fats, moderate in protein, but very low in carbohydrates and it causes the body to go into a state called ketosis.”Little says the diet can be very effective because once the body is in ketosis and starved for its preferred fuel glucose, the body’s chemistry changes and it begins to aggressively burn its fat stores. This leads to weight loss and can reverse the symptoms of diseases like Type 2 diabetes.”We were interested in finding out what happens to the body’s physiology once a dose of glucose is reintroduced,” says Cody Durrer, UBC Okanagan doctoral student and study first author. “Since impaired glucose tolerance and spikes in blood sugar levels are known to be associated with an increased risk in cardiovascular disease, it made sense to look at what was happening in the blood vessels after a sugar hit.”For their test, the researchers recruited nine healthy young males and had them consume a 75-gram glucose drink before and after a seven-day high fat, low carbohydrate diet. The diet consisted of 70 per cent fat, 10 per cent carbohydrates and 20 per cent protein, similar to that of a modern ketogenic diet.Related StoriesLow-carb diet may reverse metabolic syndrome independent of weight lossWhat happens when you eliminate sugar and adopt the keto diet?Diet and physical exercise do not reduce risk of gestational diabetes”We were originally looking for things like an inflammatory response or reduced tolerance to blood glucose,” says Durrer. “What we found instead were biomarkers in the blood suggesting that vessel walls were being damaged by the sudden spike in glucose.”Little says the most likely culprit for the damage is the body’s own metabolic response to excess blood sugar, which causes blood vessel cells to shed and possibly die.”Even though these were otherwise healthy young males, when we looked at their blood vessel health after consuming the glucose drink, the results looked like they might have come from someone with poor cardiovascular health,” adds Little. “It was somewhat alarming.”The researchers point out that with only nine individuals included in the study, more work is needed to verify their findings, but that the results should give those on a keto diet pause when considering a cheat day.”My concern is that many of the people going on a keto diet–whether it’s to lose weight, to treat Type 2 diabetes, or some other health reason–may be undoing some of the positive impacts on their blood vessels if they suddenly blast them with glucose,” he says. “Especially if these people are at a higher risk for cardiovascular disease in the first place.””Our data suggests a ketogenic diet is not something you do for six days a week and take Saturday off.”last_img read more

French firm refurbishes earnings via old iPhones

first_imgThis year, Remade intends to put 800,000 overhauled iPhones back on the market, at a discount of at least 25 percent off the as-new price.”An iPhone can have three lives, it can be refurbished twice, it’s the strongest product with the longest life,” says Millet.Cheaper Chinese smartphone brands have a stronghold in the developing world, and are seen as especially disposable. Apple and Samsung have been touting their environmental credentials, but the production process inevitably carries a cost.That include carbon emissions along with environmental degradation from the extraction of raw materials such as the metal cobalt, used in lithium-ion batteries, much of it sourced from mines in the Democratic Republic of Congo. Erwann Fangeat, an engineer at the French Environment and Energy Management Agency, praised operations like Remade. Boxes for refurbished iPhones at the “Remade” plant, where high-end mobiles are reconditioned, in Poilley, northwestern France. ‘Three lives’ Bigger, pricier iPhone expected at Apple event Wednesday One company in northern France is doing its profitable best to give an environmental makeover to smartphones, whose circuitry, batteries and plastics have become a polluting blight over the past decade. With their rapid life cycles and—for the cheaper brands—falling prices, many mobiles have become disposable items for consumers keen to move on to the latest model.But out of a large warehouse staffed by white-coated workers in Normandy, the Remade company is embracing a different approach, reconditioning thousands of Apple iPhones every day under the entrepreneurial eye of its 39-year-old boss, Matthieu Millet.He is “Matthieu” to his staff, wears jeans and sneakers, and has installed a piano in the company lobby, bringing a touch of Silicon Valley start-up culture to this windswept pocket of France facing England.Aged just 23, he bought out the TV repair business he worked for at the time and, in 2014, spotted the potential for refurbishing iPhones to tap into a market where even second hand, Apple products command a premium price.Remade—its avowedly English name another nod to US tech—reported turnover of 23 million euros ($26 million) in the first year it began overhauling iPhones.Last year that had swelled to 130 million euros and Millet is adding 200 jobs to the workforce of 850, banking on “very strong growth” this year. Remade, a company in northern France, is making a profit by reconditioning older iPhone models © 2018 AFP The new iPhone XS and XS Max costs upwards of $1,000/euros This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only. “We know how to disassemble everything, reassemble everything. The product must not only work, it must work perfectly as intended,” he said. The old phones are shipped in from telecom operators not just in Europe but the United States, whose customers have upgraded to newer models.Environmentalists complain that the spent phones all too often get dumped in landfills in the West, or farmed out to regulation-light parts of Africa and Asia where workers are forced to breathe in toxic fumes as they extract and recycle the raw materials built into the devices.Since the first iPhone’s debut in 2007, 7.1 billion smartphones have been produced worldwide but less than 20 percent of all “e-waste” including phones is recycled, according to Greenpeace.That represents a business opportunity for the likes of Millet, who is cashing in as a new top-of-the-range iPhone XS series tops 1,000 dollars/euros. Explore further “The product life of a smartphone is at least five or six years but 88 percent of French people change their smartphone while the old one still works and has value,” he said.”The longer you extend the life of the product, the more it reduces its environmental impact because it delays the fabrication of a new smartphone,” he added, noting that refurbishing an iPhone emits 90 percent less carbon dioxide than making one from scratch.That offers Millet another way to cash in, via the European Union’s “cap and trade” emissions scheme, which gives greener companies a market to sell leftover carbon credits to more polluting concerns.He hopes to obtain 100,000 tonnes of carbon credit this year, translating into millions extra for Remade’s bottom line.”I’m not Greenpeace,” an unapologetic Millet said.”But it makes me happy to have this (business) model, to know that it’s good for people and the planet.” Citation: French firm refurbishes earnings via old iPhones (2018, November 13) retrieved 17 July 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2018-11-french-firm-refurbishes-iphones.html The first Apple iPhone, launched in 2007 and the iPhone X, launched 10 years after.last_img read more

Singapores fake news laws upset tech giants

first_imgA government decision can also be appealed to the courts.’Courts will decide’K. Shanmugam, law and home affairs minister, said in a Facebook post that “the proposed law targets false statements of fact—not opinions, not criticisms.”Ultimately, disagreement over truth and falsity will be decided by the courts”.Google, Facebook and Twitter have their Asia headquarters in Singapore, a city of 5.6 million which is popular with expats as it is developed, safe and efficient.But there were already signs of tensions with tech companies as the government prepared to unveil the laws. During parliamentary hearings last year about tackling online falsehoods, Google and Facebook urged the government not to introduce new laws. Tech giants have reacted with horror after Singapore proposed laws against “fake news” allowing authorities to order the removal of content and impose hefty fines, in what critics say is an assault on free speech. The Singapore government unveiled a bill last week containing tough measures to tackle “fake news”, prompting warnings from tech giants and rights groups Critics say one of the most worrying aspects of the “fake news” legislation is that it is up to authorities to decide what is false Citation: Singapore’s ‘fake news’ laws upset tech giants (2019, April 7) retrieved 17 July 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2019-04-singapore-fake-news-laws-tech.html Facebook, Google warn Singapore against ‘fake news’ law The government unveiled a bill last week containing tough measures, including powers for ministers to order social media sites like Facebook to put warnings next to posts authorities believe to be false and in extreme cases take them down.If an action is deemed malicious and damaging to Singapore’s interests, companies could be hit with fines of up to Sg$1 million ($740,000). Individuals could face jail terms of up to 10 years.Authorities in the tightly-controlled country—long criticised for restricting civil liberties—insist the measures are necessary to stop the circulation of falsehoods which could sow divisions in the multi-ethnic city-state.But press freedom groups condemned the proposals, saying they could stifle online discussion, as did tech companies which have big investments in the ultra-modern city. “As the most far-reaching legislation of its kind to date, this level of overreach poses significant risks to freedom of expression and speech,” said the Asia Internet Coalition, an industry association whose members include Facebook, Google and Twitter. Simon Milner, Facebook’s vice president of public policy in Asia-Pacific, said the social media giant was concerned about potentially being compelled to remove content. “Giving people a place to express themselves freely and safely is important to us and we have a responsibility to handle any government request to remove alleged misinformation carefully and thoughtfully,” he said in a statement. Explore further © 2019 AFP The internet is a relatively free space in Singapore and there are some local alternative news sites, which are typically more critical of the authorities than the traditional, pro-government newspapers and TV. Singapore is among several countries pushing legislation to fight fake news, and the government stressed ordering “corrections” to be placed alongside falsehoods would be the primary response, rather than jail or fines. The government unveiled the bill last week, proposing tough measures to combat “fake news” In November, Facebook refused a request to remove an article linking Singapore to a financial scandal in Malaysia which the government said was untrue—prompting the law ministry to say the firm “cannot be relied upon to filter falsehoods”.Critics say one of the most worrying aspects of the new legislation is that it is up to authorities to decide what is false and what is not. While authorities insist decisions can be appealed, Kirsten Han, the Singapore-based editor of regional news site New Naratif, said most people do not have the resources or will to fight the government.”Even if you are convinced that your Facebook post is in the right, how many average Singaporeans would appeal to the minister, and then spend thousands of dollars to hire a lawyer and file an application in the court?” she told AFP. Human Rights Watch has described the bill as “sweepingly broad” while critics note Singapore already has tough laws against sedition, defamation and disturbing racial harmony, that can be used to police the web.But it is not yet clear how the legislation—which is likely to pass easily through the ruling party-dominated parliament—will be used in practice, and some believe authorities will wield it cautiously.”I think that the government will be very careful in their implementation of the law,” said Professor Ang Peng Hwa, from the Wee Kim Wee School of Communication and Information in Singapore.”I think, in general, there’s a very high level of trust in the government and its institutions by foreign entities, and so I don’t see them… being too trigger-happy about the implementation of this bill.” This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only.last_img read more

JDS to replace Water Resource Minister in Kerala cabinet

first_imgstate politics November 23, 2018 SHARE SHARE EMAIL SHARE politics COMMENTS Kerala COMMENT Kerala Water Resources Minister and member of the Janata Dal Secular (JD-S) Mathew T Thomas will be replaced by party colleague K Krishnankutty at the insistence of the party’s national leadership.National General Secretary Danish Ali announced this in Bengaluru at the end of a meeting with Krishnankutty and colleague MLA CK Nanu even as the incumbent Minister chose to skip it.Apparently, Thomas had skipped the meeting called by party’s national president HD Deve Gowda in protest against the overt and covert attempts within the State unit to oust him as a Minister.According to Ali, the decision was taken based on an earlier understanding that Thomas will serve a two-and-a-half year term and quit to cede space for a colleague.The JD(S) will soon submit a letter to the ruling Left Democratic Front (LDF), recommending Krishnankutty as the party’s new representative in the Cabinet, MLA CK Nanu said.What observers sayObservers said the decision taken in his absence may not go down well with Thomas, who has been known to enjoy the confidence of Chief Minister Pinarayi Vijayan.Thomas has been alleging that his colleagues-turned-detractors have been playing a series of bad tricks, including planting of a case involving a housemaid, to oust him from the post.He will not hang on to the ministership against the wishes of his party, and will reach the State capital on Saturday to submit resignation.Observers said a vertical split in the party will not be surprising, as Thomas is going into a huddle with followers in his home constituency of Tiruvalla.K Krishnankutty is expected to be sworn in as the new Minister when the State Assembly convenes in a next few days. Party member K Krishnankutty to take Mathew T Thomas’ place Published onlast_img read more