Police honour 7-yr-old who saved brother from burning home

first_imgThere has been a widespread outpouring of love and commendation for the bravery and quick-thinking shown by seven-year-old Kissan Henry after she managed to save herself and her four-year-old brother from a fire while they were at home alone.In recognition of her bravery, the Guyana Police Force on Saturday presented her with a plaque and a bottle of perfume. The simple presentation was done by Head of the Criminal Investigations Department (CID) Paul Williams, on behalf of the Commissioner and other members of the Force.“The Force has recognised her bravery and brilliant thinking from a humanitarian standpoint at such a tender age.”This initiative was the brainchild of Crime Chief Paul Williams.Last Monday evening, Kissan and her younger brother were asleep in their two-storey Glasgow New Housing Scheme, New Amsterdam, home when a fire erupted.However, the seven-year-old was awakened by the smell of smoke and after realising the house was on fire, she immediately wrapped her brother in a blanket and eased him through a window as far as the blanket could reach and then dropping him the remaining six feet.She then followed by jumping through the window; 14-feet to the ground, fracturing her leg in the process. Kissan then screamed for help and neighbours rushed over, kicking open the door to get to the fire. The fire service subsequently arrived and was able to extinguish the small blaze.At the time of the fire, the Police said the mother of the two children was at a “drug block”. Neighbours claimed they contacted the woman, informing her about the fire and she said she was on her way. By the time the mother arrived, the Police and fire service were already on the scene. After seeing the crowd, the woman reportedly told the driver to turn around and leave the area. On Wednesday, she showed up to the Police station in the company of a welfare officer.According to residents, the two minor children are left unattended and locked in the house for several hours on many occasions.A few months ago, the four-year-old boy was hospitalised after being burnt with hot portage when his sister attempted to make breakfast for him.The Childcare Department had visited the home after reports of child neglect. However, on the last occasion, they allowed the children to continue living with their mother after the children’s grandmother had promised to take care of them.The children are now in the care of an aunt.Young Kissan Henry with Crime Chief Paul Williams and others after receiving the awardlast_img read more

First Edition February 12 2014

first_imgToday’s headlines include reports about President Barack Obama’s comments yesterday on his administration’s decision to decision to give mid-sized businesses more time to comply with the health law’s employer mandate. Kaiser Health News: Telemedicine Bolsters ICU Care In Rural Maryland HospitalsReporting for Kaiser Health News, in collaboration with The Baltimore Sun, writes: “A critical care doctor 125 miles away was monitoring the patient’s health via voice, video and high-speed data lines constantly streaming information about vital signs, medications, test results and X-rays, a telemedicine service known as Maryland eCare. The physician quickly verified that the patient had the deadly infection and arranged immediate transfer to another hospital with a surgeon who could remove the infected tissue” (Rubin, 2/12). Read the story.Kaiser Health News: Questions And Answers On The Latest ACA DelayKaiser Health News staff writers Jay Hancock, Julie Appleby and Mary Agnes Carey report: “On Monday the Obama administration announced another delay in rolling out the Affordable Care Act, weakening the requirement to offer coverage next year for large employers and postponing it for smaller ones. Here’s what it means” (Hancock, Appleby and Carey, 2/11). Read the story.The Associated Press/Washington Post: Obama Doesn’t Want Health Law To PunishPresident Barack Obama says he’s giving mid-size businesses more time to comply with his health care law because the goal is not to punish anyone. Obama says the companies are trying to get right with the law and provide insurance for their employees. But they need more time to meet their responsibility (2/11).Los Angeles Times: Obama Says Latest Delay Is ‘Smoothing Out’ Shift To New Health LawPresident Obama said Tuesday the latest delay in implementing his healthcare law is an example of “smoothing out this transition” for a small group of midsize businesses struggling to meet the requirement that they provide health insurance to their employees (Hennessey, 2/11).Politico: Obama: Employer-Based Health Insurance System Not Going AnywherePresident Barack Obama on Tuesday described the latest delay in the implementation of the Affordable Care Act as a way of “smoothing out” the transition to the law and said he doesn’t see the employer-based health insurance system disappearing any time soon. “The goal is to make sure folks are healthy and have decent health care, so this was an example of administratively making sure we are smoothing out this transition giving people the opportunity to get right with the law but recognizing there are going to be circumstances people try to do the right thing and it may take time,” Obama said at a wide-ranging joint press conference with French President Francois Hollande (Epstein, 2/11).The Wall Street Journal: Some Small Firms See Little Relief In Latest Health-Law DelaySmall and midsize businesses stand to benefit the most from the latest delay in the health law’s employer insurance requirement. But farm co-owner Laura Pedersen doesn’t plan to take advantage of it. The Seneca Castle, N.Y., proprietor of a produce and grain farm last year rearranged her employees’ schedules and workloads to keep the farm’s full-time staff below 50 workers. Her goal was to avoid having to start providing insurance or pay a penalty in 2015 under the Affordable Care Act (Needleman and Colvin, 2/11).The Associated Press/Washington Post: Health Care Tweak: Big Companies Get Wiggle RoomBig retail stores, hotels, restaurants and other companies with lots of low-wage and part-time workers are among the main beneficiaries of the Obama administration’s latest tweak to health care rules. Companies with 100 or more workers will be able to avoid the biggest of two potential employer penalties in the Affordable Care Act by offering coverage to 70 percent of their full-timers (2/12).The Wall Street Journal’s Washington Wire: Top White House Aide Defends Health Law DelayA top White House aide defended the Obama administration’s latest decision to delay a part of the Affordable Care Act’s implementation, saying Tuesday that policy makers were trying to create a “smoother transition” for businesses. Gene Sperling, director of the White House’s National Economic Council, also blasted Republicans for criticizing the administration’s decision Monday to give many small businesses additional time to comply with parts of the law (Paletta, 2/11).The New York Times: Creators Still In Demand On Health Care WebsiteAfter denigrating the work of CGI and replacing it as the largest contractor on the federal health care website, the Obama administration is negotiating with the company to extend its work on the project for a few months. And the new prime contractor, Accenture, is trying to recruit and hire CGI employees to work under its supervision. The transition between the two companies has interrupted work on the “back end” of the computer system needed to pay insurers, people involved in the project said Tuesday (Pear and Austen, 2/11).The Associated Press/Washington Post: Md. Lawmaker Wants Probe Of Exchange ProcurementA Maryland lawmaker on Tuesday renewed a call for an investigation into the state’s defective health care exchange with a focus on the procurement process of the exchange’s board, which has approved multimillion dollar contracts (2/11).Los Angeles Times: Vaccination Exemptions Still On States’ Legislative AgendasEighteen state legislatures, including California’s, have considered exemptions to immunization mandates in the last several years — and the issue remains a topic of debate, researchers said Tuesday. Most of the bills introduced in those 18 states sought to expand the exemptions available to school immunization requirements, but none of those bills passed, researchers wrote in the Journal of the American Medical Assn. (MacVean, 2/11).The Washington Post: Va. Legislators Push Flurry Of Bills At Session’s Halfway PointVirginia’s General Assembly plowed through hundreds of bills Tuesday, reaching broad consensus on ethics, school testing and mental health reforms while also picking new partisan fights and bracing for a Medicaid battle that will test Gov. Terry McAuliffe’s ability to work across the aisle. Racing against a deadline to get bills out of one chamber and into the other, legislators put the final touches on measures aimed at limiting gifts to public officials, reducing standardized tests in public schools and improving the handling of psychiatric emergencies — all priorities that enjoy bipartisan support (Vozzella, Laris and Weiner, 2/11).Check out all of Kaiser Health News’ e-mail options including First Edition and Breaking News alerts on our Subscriptions page. First Edition: February 12, 2014 This is part of the KHN Morning Briefing, a summary of health policy coverage from major news organizations. 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