Girls basketball Bees avenge lone defeat, tops C-NS

first_imgThen, said senior captain Katie Pascale, “in the second half we started to make some shots.”Plenty of shots fell, helped by B’ville’s defensive pressure that forced a rash of C-NS turnovers, and late in the third quarter the Bees held a 33-20 advantage.But it almost went away as, helped by a 10-0 run, C-NS pulled within one, 35-34, with more than six minutes to play, finally getting some outside shots to go with Cook’s production as she finished with 21 points.Ultimately, it was Ola Bednarczyk sinking a pair of crucial 3-pointers to thwart the Northstars’ comeback, the last of them with 2:18 to play that made it 43-36. C-NS never got closer than four points again.Prior to that, Bednarczyk only had one field goal all night as Pascale earned 13 of her 17 points in the second half. Hannah Mimas, Sydney Huhtala and Kyrah Wilbur had six points apiece.While C-NS survived a tense battle with West Genesee last Tuesday thanks to Cook’s 36 points, B’ville had no stress at all in its game against Corcoran that same night.The Bees blasted the Cougars 86-47, steadily accumulating a 63-29 margin through the first three quarters and seeing 10 different players get on the scoreboard by game’s end.Mimas led the way, earning 21 points. Pascale got 15 points, with Bednarczyk earning 11 points. Jordan Roy got eight points as Huhtala and Wilbur had six points apiece.Share this:FacebookTwitterLinkedInRedditComment on this Story C-NS held the no. 10 state AA rankings, two spots ahead of the Bees in the no. 12 spot. Yet the Northstars were short-handed, without junior forward Julia Rowe in the lineup.This put far more pressure on Jessica Cook, and the Bees were glad to provide it, offering double and triple teams during the first quarter and forcing her to the bench with two fouls.Meanwhile, B’ville’s offense struggled, too, shut out in the game’s first five-plus minutes and struggling for baskets throughout the half, even as it went to the break holding a 14-11 lead. Tags: Baldwinsvillegirls basketballcenter_img Nearly four weeks had passed since the Baldwinsville girls basketball team suffered its lone defeat of the season to Cicero-North Syracuse.Neither side had lost since, so the stakes of last Thursday’s rematch at Baker High School were quite big, ranging from the SCAC Metro division regular-season title to a possible top seed in the Section III Class AA playoffs.It proved tense, physical and draining, but when all was done the Bees had toppled the Northstars 48-40, earning a share of the league title (both teams finishing 13-1) and 19-1 overall.last_img read more

Emily Hawryschuk’s game-winner lifts Syracuse over Northwestern 15-14 in overtime

first_imgEmily Hawryschuk told herself to be calm. She knew Gary Gait trusted her to shoot the first time — she just had to try one more time. So when she moved from her normal area, the left side of the net, to the middle of field, 25 yards from the net, Hawryschuk gathered for a brief moment.She looked off Nicole Levy on the right — the second scoring option of Gait’s play — and sprinted forward. She had 10 yards of space in front of her and made it halfway to the goal before Syracuse’s cutters on both edges stopped moving. It was Hawryschuk’s moment.Face guarding antics from Nell Copeland were lost. Standing still in the middle of field without a stick in the air was forgotten. Her lifeless second half didn’t matter anymore. A full wind up toward the top left corner of the net did, though. “Shot clock is going down,” Hawryschuk said. “I just put it away.”Her game-winning goal ended the thought of another opposition’s comeback over Syracuse. The team who couldn’t finish last year, Gait said, and blew a five-goal lead to No. 1 Boston College last Saturday, was a shot away from blowing another lead: this one, a 12-9 advantage midway through the second half. But, No. 7 Syracuse (4-1, 0-1 Atlantic Coast) rebounded over No. 5 Northwestern (3-1), 15-14, and picked up its first win over a ranked opponent.AdvertisementThis is placeholder textAnna Henderson | Digital Design EditorHawryschuk, Syracuse’s top attack, spent the first half face guarded by a rotation of Wildcat defenders. But after a hat trick in the opening 22 minutes, the junior was stationary after a change in defensive scheme. Her offense was quiet until SU’s lone possession in overtime — the only time it counted.“Em got that shot because she wanted it,” midfielder Sam Swart said. “I knew if I put the ball in Chuckie’s hands, she could finish it.”Before Sunday’s heroics, Hawryschuk still was the team’s leading goal-scorer (10), but with a balanced attack including five players with double-digit points, she wasn’t always the first option. But that’s not how Northwestern saw her.Copeland, a defender, pressed the SU junior, inching her face closer to Hawryschuk’s. She stuck her tongue out at her, tried to make Hawryschuk laugh and stared into her eyes while Northwestern was on offense.“She was definitely trying to get into my head,” Hawryschuk said. “But I didn’t let her get in my head.”TJ Shaw | Staff PhotographerSo when Hawryschuk was face-guarded on the Orange’s first two possessions, she shuffled her legs for picks offs — not trying to get the ball rather forcing two defenders to stick with her. Starting 20 yards from the net, the junior faked a routine pass right. Two NU defenders reacted with a double team. It didn’t stop Hawryschuk. She cut in between her defenders, shimmied right, broke the ankles of one and left the other in the rearview.  Hawryschuk got closer and swung a shot toward a crevice in the middle of two more NU defenders. It ripped the back of the net.“It was shooting to score,” Hawryschuk said, “and putting everything behind it.”Six minutes later, Copeland upped her antics. Her stare-downs and pressured started 60 yards from the net. It didn’t bother Hawryschuk, she said, but it did provide extra motivation. So off an out of bounds play, Hawryschuk waved her stick, beginning for the ball to start outside of the end zone. In the back of the end zone, she hesitated and made Copeland trip. Hawryschuk stormed to the net to score her third goal of the game on a one-hopper. Instead of jumping toward her teammates or celebrating immediately, she looked behind the net, right in the direction of Copeland.Syracuse entered the half just up a goal, 9-8, but Hawryschuk was dominating. Similar to last year, when Northwestern flipped from zone to man-to-man, the Wildcats did the opposite. Hawryschuk torched one-on-one and wasn’t fazed by Copeland and her pressure. But when the junior was stuck in the middle of the field surrounded by three defenders in her vicinity, she was stagnant.“She was sticking to game plan,” Gait said. “Knowing everything was going to fall into place. And slowly, the Wildcats fought back. SU’s offense operated right, the remnants of a pressured Hawryschuk in the first half still there. When she was open close to the net, she wasn’t found. When she picked up a ground ball, it was taken away from her. She played into Northwestern’s strategy. A 12-9 SU lead shrunk. Aside from Hawryschuk, SU’s offense couldn’t score — without a goal for over 18 minutes at one point in the second half. Northwestern slowly crushed Sarah Cooper and Kerry Defliese in the back, and rattled off five consecutive goals.Another Syracuse lead blown — a continuous trend of last year’s 9-10 team — was looming. But Northwestern fell into its own hole.  Sierra Cockerville scored with five minutes left, and after a jersey change to No. 10 on the team’s final possession in regulation, freshman Megan Carney drove half the length of the field to tie the game.Hawryschuk put No. 51 on her back once more, and headed to the 50 yard line for the draw. She struggled in the second half, she said, and thought about it going into overtime. The ball went to the Wildcats, who missed on an errant shot, and Gait called a timeout.His top attack hadn’t scored in almost 40 minutes. But he designed the play around Hawryschuk.“I trusted the team to play good offense,” Gait said. “Em was cutting hard and working hard all day.”He drew up a look for Hawryschuk on the left side — her side. If that wasn’t there, go to Levy. If Northwestern compromised both, at least one cutter would be open. On the ensuing possession, Hawryschuk bypassed her options and was squandered around the crease. She fell to the ground, stayed there and expected a foul. But it didn’t come.“It sort of fell through a little,” Hawryschuk said. “Not getting a foul and all.” Mary Rahal picked up Hawryschuk’s miss, and after two passes, it was back in the junior’s hands. Seconds later, it was in the back of the net. “People feel comfortable giving (Hawryschuk) the opportunity,” Gait said. “And we did. We gutted it out.” Published on February 24, 2019 at 2:43 pm Contact KJ: kjedelma@syr.edu | @KJEdelman Comments Facebook Twitter Google+last_img read more

Humanitarian Aid Workers Risk All in Worlds Conflict Areas

first_imgShareTweetShareEmail0 SharesApril 19, 2014; Chicago Tribune (Reuters)When you’re reading about the trials and tribulations of nonprofits in the U.S., just remember the courage it takes to be engaged in delivering humanitarian aid in conflict areas around the world. Last week, gunmen in Karachi, Pakistan, kidnapped two men who worked for the United Nations Children’s Fund, commonly known as UNICEF. This follows on the kidnapping of three men who were working for a Saudi NGO constructing homes in Karachi.All too often, the victims are not just NGO workers, but the beneficiaries of institutions operating in these conflict zones. The most horrendous example of recent weeks has been the mass kidnapping of over 120 girls by the organization known as Boko Haram (which means, in a Hausa dialect, “Western education is sin”) from a secondary school in the northeastern Nigerian town of Chibok.As has probably been the state of affairs for a long time, there is little in the way of safety guaranteed for humanitarian aid workers. In Bor in South Sudan, armed forces of one sort or another stormed a United Nations compound housing nearly 5,000 displaced persons, killing and wounding dozens and prompting Oxfam to reconsider its security procedures, given the difficulty in relying on the safety of a UN camp for its workers engaged in a water and sanitation project.Even when rebels or government authorities aren’t engaged in attacking or kidnapping aid workers, some governments do all they can do to make humanitarian aid next to impossible. In the Sudan, where a truly retrograde regime holds power, the government has suspended the activities of the International Committee of the Red Cross (ICRC) because it refused Khartoum’s request that its resources be transferred to the Sudan Red Crescent. More recently, the Sudanese government expelled the British aid organization Merlin because it had merged with Save the Children, which Khartoum had expelled earlier (in 2009, Save the Children/US was booted by the government along with Doctors Without Borders/Médecins Sans Frontières, the International Rescue Committee, and Oxfam/Great Britain.)It takes a tremendous amount of courage—institutional and personal—to commit to delivering aid in conflict areas where abductions and murders are disturbingly frequent and conducted with impunity. Everyone should take time to remember the aid workers who risk their lives trying to help people. They represent the best of all of us.—Rick CohenShareTweetShareEmail0 Shareslast_img read more