Snitch Movie Promotion

first_imgThanks to our friends at STUDIOCANAL, Touch Football Australia has 10 double passes to the new Dwayne Johnson movie ‘Snitch’, only at the movies from May 16.In the fast-paced action thriller, Snitch, Dwayne Johnson stars as a father whose teenage son is wrongly accused of a drug distribution crime and is looking at a mandatory minimum prison sentence of 10 years. Desperate and determined to rescue his son at all costs, he makes a deal with the U.S. attorney to work as an undercover informant and infiltrate a drug cartel on a dangerous mission — risking everything, including his family and his own life. For your chance to win a double pass to Snitch, send an email to media@austouch.com.au telling us why you’d like to win tickets to this film. The best 10 answers will receive a double pass and TFA will be in contact with you if you are a winner. Related LinksMovie Promotionlast_img read more

Give Local America: An opportunity to grow online

first_imgNetwork for Good is happy to partner with Kimbia to extend the reach of Give Local America, a nation-wide giving day that marks the 100-year milestone of community foundations in the United States.This national online giving event will take on May 6, 2014. Give Local America is expected to be the largest online giving day ever held on a single platform. Giving days help nonprofits connect with new donors in an easy and efficient way. Give Local America uses the power and pride of local communities to tie it all together. Want to find out more and get involved? To sign up, visit www.givelocalamerica.org, find your city, and follow the easy registration process.last_img read more

14 Reasons Donor Management Will Save You This Year

first_imgStill tracking your donors through five different versions of Excel spreadsheets, endless email chains, and Post-It notes? Let’s be real:  you need a better way to manage your individual donors.A donor management system will save you time and will help you be a smarter fundraiser. Not sure how this works? Here are the top 14 ways a donor management system will help you this year:Raise more money by targeting donors. Smart donor management allows you to easily create dynamic lists and develop targeted campaigns to donors based on giving history, average gift amount, and more.Eliminate repetitive, manual, and time-consuming tasks by automating standard processes and workflows. Free up your staff to focus on building relationships instead of administrative tasks.Track campaign results in real time. Spend less time (and money) on tracking results from your campaigns and more time planning your next one.Remove the need to sift through multiple spreadsheets and applications to find donor data. Once you move to a donor management system, it’s all in one place and accessible online so you can look up information anywhere.Know how you are progressing towards your December goals. Online fundraising data flows into your donor database to automatically update charts and reports giving you a clearer picture of how close you are to achieving your fundraising goals.Understand your donors and their behaviors. Storing detailed information like donation, volunteer, event attendance, demographics, and participation information will help you better understand what you donors want from your organization (and what they don’t want).Share information between staff and volunteers. A donor database will help you avoid confusion and have everyone operating off the same information. No more searching through an inbox to find the latest version, it’s all stored in one place and updated in real time.Check donor information on the go. Take your filing cabinet with you by having mobile access to view and enter notes right after you make a donor visit.Retain your year-end donors and build stronger relationships. A great donor management system will send automatic thank you emails for donations and reminder emails for pledges that are yet to be fulfilled.Get the most from all your tools with seamless integration. Connect email marketing, donation forms, and peer-to-peer fundraising campaigns so every bit of data is stored in one place.Keep donor relationships strong even when staff turnover happens. Notes are stored in a donor record so when a new staff member starts, all communication history is at their fingertips.Allow staff and volunteers to see only what they need to see. Control access to constituent information by setting permissions to records and data fields.Track incoming funds and pledges. View progress in a dashboard format that is board meeting ready.Remove the need for IT resources to hold your hand every step of the way. A good donor management system should be easy to set up and maintain by development staff. You shouldn’t have to wait on IT support to do your job.With the right donor management, smarter fundraising tools, and a solid campaign plan, you’ll be all set to raise more this year—and for years to come.last_img read more

The PartoPen: Working to Increase the Effectiveness of the Partograph

first_imgPosted on August 10, 2012Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to email this to a friend (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window)Our colleagues at Maternova recently highlighted on their innovation index a new tool (that is currently in development) that aims to increase the effectiveness of the partograph. The PartoPen is being developed by University of Colorado-Boulder Ph.D candidate Heather Underwood.According to Maternova’s innovation index:Using an infrared camera, the pen takes picture of dots that are pre-printed on the paper that act as GPS coordinates for the pen. The pen provides real-time feedback for:     · Decision support: Based on location of the pen on graph, the pen will provide next steps     · Reminders: Auto-reminders of time and procedure     · Error Checking: ex. Recording a temperature in F vs. C, pen recognizes the errorThe digital partograph system provides real-time data feedback and reinforces birth attendant training, while retaining the paper-and-pen interface currently used by most healthcare workers. The system is currently being evaluated in Kenya.This project received a $100,000 Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation grant to develop and implement the technology.Learn more about this new tool from Maternova here.More information:Visit the PartoPen site.Access several documents about the partograph in the MHTF Library. (Just enter “partograph” in the search box!)Read a number of blog posts about the partograph on the MHTF Blog.Share this: ShareEmailPrint To learn more, read:last_img read more

The Impact of Year-End Giving [Infographic]

first_imgSince it was founded in 2012, #GivingTuesday has exploded in popularity. In 2015, $116.7 million were donated in this one day. The next year, that number jumped to $168 million. 2017 is expected to be record-breaking as well.So, what can you do to make sure you get your piece of the giving day pie?Our research here at Network for Good shows that, rather than seeing #GivingTuesday as a single event, it pays to approach this day as the kick-off of a month-long year-end giving campaign. In fact, nonprofits who used #GivingTuesday to launch their year-end campaigns raised, on average, five times more overall during year-end.Not only that, but nonprofits using Donor Management raised more than those without it. It makes sense – having a donor management system lets you effectively harness your data to create better plans, quickly create targeted emails to specific subsets of donors, and easily store this information from year to year to build on your past success.If you’ve never participated before, now’s the time to start.last_img read more

4 Fundraising Ideas to Develop Your Fundraising Plan

first_img“A goal without a plan is just a wish.” ― Antoine de Saint-ExupéryEmbarking on a new year—whether it’s a calendar or fiscal year (or both!)—is always an opportunity for a fresh start.  After all, that’s why resolutions are written at the start of a new year.  New year. New goals.  It’s the same with writing a development plan for your nonprofit, which you can think of as a business plan for fundraising. It helps you develop the discipline of looking at what you’ve done well and where you need to improve, setting your sights for the year ahead, and mapping out what you will do to reach your goals. Simply put, it translates your wishes to goals.Let’s pause for a moment to think about the 30,000-foot view. Fundraising is not just about raising money. The core of our work as fundraisers is as relationship architects between our organizations and the donors who currently or, we hope will eventually, support us. Our goal is to create two-way conversations that are not transactional or circular exchanges of asking and receiving money. We know this isn’t sustainable in the long-term. A development plan is more than just a set of lists, calendars, and activities.  It’s a strategic compilation of all the ways you can connect and communicate with your donors which, if done effectively, leads to increased revenue. It’s a competitive market out there. There are 1.8 million nonprofits in the US with about 75,000 new ones registering with the IRS each year. If you feel like the room is getting crowded, so do our donors. What makes the difference to them is if they feel valued by you and connected to your organization. If not, they’ll go somewhere else to give.So, your development plan should focus on four key areas:1. Balancing your portfolio:If your funding generally comes from one source more than others, it’s time to think about how to rebalance things. This might mean looking at how to welcome more individual donors instead of relying primarily on foundations and/or corporations. It could also mean thinking about others ways to build donor relationships besides the one major gala or one major direct mail appeal you do each year. Putting all your eggs in the proverbial basket is not sustainable.2. Setting the stage for major gifts:Every organization no matter how small can, and should, be raising major gifts. A successful major gifts program does not focus on high net-worth individuals with no connection to your organization. In fact, you probably already know who your major (current and potential) donors are. Your next major gift will likely come from one of these donors who has the capacity and who has been supporting you for a long time (and not at particularly high levels) and may also have been involved as a volunteer. Carving out a little time for more personal interactions with these donors will help you qualify those who can make larger gifts down the road.3. Creating greater donor engagement:It’s easy to become complacent and think that just because donors have chosen to invest in our cause, they will unconditionally support us and that when we ask again they will give. Nonprofits on average lose more than 60% of their donors each year because they haven’t figured out the right way to connect with their donors. Good donor engagement involves a regular calendar of touchpoints, updates, and communications that highlights stories of successes, progress, results, and even failures and challenges. Donors want to see, feel, and touch the impact their gifts are having. They want a donor relationship and an exceptional donor experience. You are most likely already doing it without defining these activities in that way: annual reports, newsletters, special webinars hosted by your key program leadership, holiday and birthday cards are all examples of ways to leverage communications to enhance your relationships with your donors.4. Laying the foundation for tomorrow:Without question, your limited bandwidth should be focused on donor retention because once you lose the donors who already opted to give to you, it’s hard to get them back. That said, it is still important to plant the seeds for the next pipeline of donors to your organization. The best potential new donor names are people who self-identify in some way or who are connected in some way to you. Perhaps it’s through a sign-up on your website, following you on social media, attendance at an event, or a visitor book if prospective donors can visit your facilities. This is also a way board members and other volunteers can play a key role in introducing your organization to their networks.  Every follower, volunteer, and the new name that crosses your doorway should be considered a potential investor in your work. Welcome them.For more thoughts on how to propel your nonprofit forward, download our free Fundraising Plan eGuide or hire Network for Good personal fundraising coach to Building Stronger Donor Engagement and Raising More Money, as we explore this topic in greater detail.last_img read more

From the Archives | The Global and National Maternal Mortality Targets for the Sustainable Development Goals

first_imgSierra Leone (1,360)Finland (3) Ten Countries with the highest MMRs (per 100,000 live births)Ten Countries with the lowest MMRs   (per 100,000 live births) ShareEmailPrint To learn more, read: For countries with current MMRs less than 10 deaths per 100,000 live births, measuring a two-thirds reduction is not feasible due to statistical limitations. Those countries with low MMRs should therefore focus on reducing internal inequities. National-level MMRs can hide disparities within countries: Women of low socioeconomic status, belonging to certain racial or ethnic groups and those living in rural areas, for example, are often at greatest risk of dying from pregnancy or childbirth-related causes. Therefore, all countries are called to focus on eliminating inequities among sub-populations under the new goals framework.The SDG 3.1 global target of less than 70 deaths per 100,000 live births represents an ambitious reduction in the global burden of maternal mortality from the current global MMR. Data from the Global Burden of Disease Study 2015 estimates that the global MMR is 196 deaths per 100,000 live births. According to the World Health Organization, the global MMR is even higher, at approximately 216 deaths per 100,000 live births. But the global goal is achievable if all countries contribute to the global average by accelerating their national reduction of preventable maternal deaths by at least two-thirds and ensuring that no woman and no country is left behind, a key theme of the Global Strategy.Clearly, we all still have far to go in order to achieve both the global and national targets for maternal mortality. Reducing the global MMR to less than 70 deaths per 100,000 live births through national reduction of MMR by two-thirds in all countries by 2030 and reducing inequities in maternal survival within and among countries will be challenging; but with continued investment in maternal health research, programs and policy at the global, national and local levels, we can work together to end preventable maternal mortality across the globe.Learn more by checking out these resources:Strategies Toward Ending Preventable Maternal Mortality (EPMM) | World Health OrganizationThe Sustainable Development Goals and Maternal Mortality | MHTF Topic PageEnding Preventable Maternal Mortality | MHTF ProjectStrategies Toward Ending Preventable Maternal Mortality (EPMM) Under the Sustainable Development Goals Agenda | MHTF BlogA Common Monitoring Framework for Ending Preventable Maternal Mortality, 2015–2030: Phase I of a Multi-Step Process | BMC Pregnancy and ChildbirthEnding Preventable Maternal and Newborn Mortality and Stillbirths | BMJ—How do you think we can reduce maternal deaths around the world? We want to hear from you!Share this: Chad (856)Iceland (3) Democratic Republic of the Congo (693)Sweden (4) South Sudan (789)Austria (4) Burundi (712)Italy (4) Nigeria (814)Poland (3) Posted on September 20, 2017September 20, 2017By: Rima Jolivet, Maternal Health Technical Director, Maternal Health Task Force; Sarah Hodin, Project Coordinator II, Women and Health Initiative, Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public HealthClick to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to email this to a friend (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window)There has been some confusion recently about the Sustainable Development Goals (SDG) target for reducing global maternal mortality. The SDG global target is to reduce the global maternal mortality ratio (MMR) to less than 70 per 100,000 live births by 2030. In addition to this global target, there are separate country-level targets: The primary national target is that by 2030, every country should reduce its MMR by at least two-thirds from its 2010 baseline. The secondary target, which applies to countries with the highest maternal mortality burdens, is that no country should have an MMR greater than 140 deaths per 100,000 live births by 2030.SDG 3.1 global target:By 2030, reduce the global maternal mortality ratio to less than 70 deaths per 100,000 live births.EPMM national targets:Primary target: By 2030, all countries should reduce their maternal mortality ratios by at least two-thirds from their 2010 baseline.Secondary target: By 2030, no country should have a maternal mortality ratio greater than 140 deaths per 100,000 live births.These global and national maternal mortality targets, developed by a group of technical experts through extensive consultations with global and country-level stakeholders, were published in a 2015 report, Strategies for Ending Preventable Maternal Mortality (EPMM Strategies). The EPMM Strategies report fed into the development of the Global Strategy for Women’s, Children’s and Adolescents’ Health, 2016-2030 (Global Strategy), a framework for achieving the Sustainable Development Goals related to the health of women, children and adolescents.Understanding the distinction between the global and national targets is crucial. The global target alone is not useful for instituting country-level change. Countries need to set national targets to drive reduction in maternal deaths and thus contribute to meeting the global goal. The primary national target—that every country should reduce its MMR by at least two-thirds from its 2010 baseline levels—takes each country’s different starting point into account while still holding countries accountable for their own progress toward the common SDG goal.Each country has a unique starting point: a different baseline MMR and epidemiological risk profile, different health system capacity and resources and a different sociopolitical climate for work on reducing maternal mortality. These differences are reflected in the wide disparities in MMR among countries around the globe. National MMRs range from 3 deaths per 100,000 live births in Finland, Greece, Iceland and Poland to 1,360 deaths per 100,000 live births in Sierra Leone. This disparity illustrates that, unfortunately, a woman’s risk of maternal death depends largely on where she lives. Thus, the secondary national target—that no country should have a national MMR greater than 140 deaths per 100,000 live births  by 2030—was proposed as an important mechanism for reducing extreme inequities in global maternal survival. Liberia (725)Czech Republic (4) Somalia (732)Belarus (4) Data are estimates from “Trends in maternal mortality: 1990 to 2015” Estimates by WHO, UNICEF, UNFPA, World Bank Group and the United Nations Population Division Gambia (706)Kuwait (4) Central African Republic (882)Greece (3)last_img read more

The Current State of Maternal Health in Nepal

first_img ShareEmailPrint To learn more, read: Posted on December 29, 2017January 2, 2018By: Amrit Banstola, Public Health Practitioner, NepalClick to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to email this to a friend (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window)In November 2017, the most recent Nepal Demographic and Health Survey (NDHS) was published with national data from 2016. The 2016 NDHS is one of the most comprehensive demographic and public health reports released by the Nepalese Ministry of Health in the last five years. Below are some highlighted findings from the report that illustrate the current state of maternal health in Nepal, progress made so far and gaps to address moving forward.Maternal mortalityThe maternal mortality ratio (MMR) in Nepal decreased from 539 maternal deaths per 100,000 live births to 239 maternal deaths per 100,000 live births between 1996 and 2016. In 2016, roughly 12% of deaths among women of reproductive age were classified as maternal deaths.Antenatal careIn 2016, 84% of pregnant women had at least one antenatal care (ANC) contact with a skilled provider—defined as either a doctor, nurse or midwife/auxiliary nurse midwife—which was a 25% increase from 2011. The percentage of women who had four or more ANC visits increased steadily from 50% in 2011 to 69% in 2016.Although the report showed increases in skilled ANC utilization, only 49% of women received counselling on five critical components during ANC: use of a skilled birth attendant (SBA), facility-based delivery, information about danger signs during pregnancy, where to go in case of danger signs and the benefits of postnatal care. Utilization of ANC services was a significant predictor of place of delivery and SBA-assisted births.Women in the highest wealth quintile with a high education level and those residing in urban areas were much more likely to have four or more ANC contacts from a skilled provider compared to women of lower socioeconomic status and education and those living in rural areas.Place of delivery and skilled birth attendanceAmong the notable findings in this year’s report was the rise in facility-based delivery and the use of SBAs. Between 2011 and 2016, there was a 22% increase in both the proportion of institutional deliveries (from 35% to 57%) and births assisted by SBAs (from 36% to 58%). Doctors assisted 31% of total deliveries, and nurses and midwives/auxiliary nurse midwives assisted 27%. While the percentage of deliveries attended by traditional birth attendants decreased from 11% in 2011 to 5% in 2016, the home birth rate remained high at 41%. Many women in Nepal still deliver with no one present or with an untrained friend or relative.There were large socioeconomic disparities in this area as well. While 90% of women in the highest wealth quintile delivered in a health facility, the same was true for only 34% of women in the lowest quintile. 89% of the wealthiest women delivered with an SBA, but only 34% of the poorest women did so. Similarly, the percentage of births attended by SBAs was 85% among women who had secondary or higher education and 38% among women without a formal education. Rates of facility-based delivery and the use of SBAs also varied among different provinces.Postnatal careThe percentage of women who received a postnatal care (PNC) assessment within two days following delivery rose from 45% in 2011 to 57% in 2016. 81% of women who delivered in a health facility and 13% of women who delivered elsewhere received PNC within two days of delivery. However, there were significant socioeconomic disparities in PNC utilization: 81% of women in the highest wealth quintile had an early PNC visit compared to only 37% among women in the lowest wealth quintile.The way forwardOverall, Nepal has made substantial progress in improving maternal health care access and utilization. However, disparities remain according to women’s socioeconomic status, education level and place of residence. Additionally, efforts are needed to improve the quality of maternal health care to end preventable maternal deaths.Nepal has committed to doing its part to achieve Sustainable Development Goal (SDG) target 3.1 of reducing the global MMR to less than 70 maternal deaths per 100,000 live births by 2030. To achieve this ambitious target, Nepal will need to reduce its MMR by at least 7.5% annually addressing severe inequities in maternal health access, utilization and quality.—Learn more about maternal mortality under the SDGs.Explore data on maternal and newborn health care coverage in countries across the globe on the Countdown to 2030 website.Are you interested in writing for the Maternal Health Task Force blog? Check out our guest post guidelines.Share this:last_img read more

Halifax military police officer pleads not guilty to sexual assault

first_imgHALIFAX – The complainant in a sex assault case against a Halifax-based military policeman says she woke up confused in her hotel bed and felt the sensation of “skin to skin” as a man’s body pressed against her.The military officer, whose identity is protected by a court-ordered publication ban, said she repeatedly said no, but was ignored during an incident alleged to have taken place during a Canadian Navy exercise in Glasgow, Scotland during the early morning hours of Sept. 27, 2015.Sgt. Kevin MacIntyre, 48, entered a not guilty plea Monday to a charge of sexual assault at the beginning of a court martial proceeding in Halifax.MacIntyre, a member of the military since 2002, is being tried before a military judge and a five-man military panel composed of three officers and two non-commissioned officers.“This is a case about a sexual assault and about someone who was simply not willing to take no for an answer,” military prosecutor Navy Lt. Jennifer Besner told the panel.“The nature of sexual assault, the people that commit this offence, and the people that are victims of it may not always be what we expect,” said Besner. “The way a victim may react during an assault or afterwards may also challenge our assumptions.”Besner said the alleged assault against the complainant occurred after a long day of travel, a day of work, and an evening of socializing and drinking with other members of the Canadian Forces.“While she slept the accused entered her room, got into her bed and proceeded to sexually assault her, ignoring her refusals and her attempts to resist,” Besner said.She said the complainant “barely knew” the accused, having met him just shortly before the deployment.Under questioning by military prosecutor Maj. Larry Langlois, the complainant said she returned to her hotel room in an exhausted state following the night out. She said she hadn’t slept for about 36 hours after travelling from Canada and going straight to work in Glasgow on Sept. 26.She said she was helped back to her room by another female officer although she wasn’t impaired, and was inside the room when she turned around and saw MacIntyre standing by the doorway.The complainant said MacIntyre and the other woman left soon after she stripped down to her white top and underwear and crawled in bed. She said they returned shortly after she had woken up in a panic minutes later, wondering where she had left her passport, and she let them in.Once she found the passport, she said the female officer and MacIntyre sat on her bed and chatted a while before leaving her alone once more.The complainant said she fell asleep again, but was startled awake by a man in her bed. She said he was pressed against her from behind in a “spooning position” and although she couldn’t see him she knew it was MacIntyre because she recognized his voice.“It was him trying to touch my vagina with his hand, that’s what woke me up,” she said. “I don’t know how he got there naked.”She said she didn’t scream or yell but she told him “No,” as she was forced to continually remove his hand from her lower extremities “10 to 15 times.”“It happened to me and I think I just froze. I could have just yelled, there was a room beside me, but I didn’t even think about it.”The complainant said she eventually passed out after rolling from her side to her stomach but was soon awake again to a voice asking her “Do you like it?”She told the court she was penetrated during sex that lasted 15 to 20 minutes.“I felt so dirty,” she said. “I did not do anything … and I have to live with it.”The complainant said she eventually fell asleep again and MacIntyre was still in her bed when she woke up around 6:30 a.m. She said she asked him to leave and he did while she waited in the bathroom.The complainant said she discussed some details about the incident with her superior and others on the deployment, but didn’t want to make a formal complaint because she is married and she didn’t want her husband to find out before she could tell him what happened.The formal complaint was finally made about six months later on March 21, 2016, she said, after she suffered a panic attack while on a deployment in Jamaica.“This trip to Montego Bay was the best thing that could happen because it made me realize that I can’t live like that forever. It made me realize that I needed to do something about it.”The complainant is scheduled to be cross-examined by the defence when the hearing resumes Tuesday.last_img read more

TERRENCE MANN KAREN ZIEMBA LOUISE PITRE AND MORE TO LEAD AHRENS FLAHERTYS

first_img Twitter Login/Register With: Facebook LEAVE A REPLY Cancel replyLog in to leave a comment TERRENCE MANN, KAREN ZIEMBA, LOUISE PITRE AND MORE TO LEAD AHRENS & FLAHERTY’S MARIE IN SEATTLEBroadway visionaries meet ballet royalty at The 5th Avenue Theatre this spring in Marie: A New Musical. Tony Award-winning authors Lynn Ahrens and Stephen Flaherty (Ragtime, Once On This Island), five-time Tony Award-winning director and choreographer Susan Stroman (The Producers, Contact), and acclaimed New York City Ballet principal dancer Tiler Peck invite you backstage into 19th-century Paris, where glittering opulence hobnobbed with underworld dangers. Marie was formerly titled Little Dancer in a previous production that played at The Kennedy Center in 2015.Joining Peck are Tony Award-nominated actors Terrence Mann (Broadway Original Casts: Javert in Les Misérables, Beast in the Beauty and the Beast, Rum Tum Tugger in Cats) as Edgar Degas, Louise Pitre (Broadway: Mamma Mia!) as Adult Marie, Dee Hoty (Broadway: Footloose, Bye Bye Birdie) as Mary Cassat, Tony-winning actress Karen Ziemba (Broadway: Contact, Bullets Over Broadway, 42nd Street) as Martine Van Goethem, and Jenny Powers (Broadway: Grease, Little Women) as Antoinette Van Goethem. Kyle Harris (National Tour: West Side Story), who originated the role of Christian at The Kennedy Center, will also return. Christopher Gurr (Broadway: Spamalot, Tuck Everlasting, All the Way) joins the cast as Corbeil and Degas Understudy, with Noelle Hogan (Off-Broadway: The Runaways; National Tour: Fun Home) as Charlotte Van Goethem. READ MORETILER PECK, TERRENCE MANN, DEE HOTY, LOUISE PITRE, AND KAREN ZIEMBA SET FOR MARIE AT SEATTLE’S 5TH AVENUEMarie, A New Musical, from Tony winners Susan Stroman, Lynn Ahrens, and Stephen Flaherty, has announced casting for its Seattle debut, which will begin performances March 22 at the 5th Avenue Theatre. Advertisement New York City Principal Ballet Dancer Tiler Peck, who starred in the musical’s 2014 Kennedy Center engagement under the title Little Dancer, will return to the role of Marie, opposite Tony nominee Terrence Mann as Degas.The cast will also feature Louise Pitre as Adult Marie, Dee Hoty as Mary Cassat, Tony winner Karen Ziemba as Martine Van Goethem, Jenny Powers as Antoinette Van Goethem, Kyle Harris as Christian, Christopher Gurr as Corbeil and Degas Understudy, with Noelle Hogan as Charlotte Van Goethem. READ MORETILER PECK, TERRENCE MANN, KAREN ZIEMBA TO STAR IN AHRENS AND FLAHERTY’S MARIEThe show is a newly revised edition of the musical Little Dancer.Principal casting has been announced for the 5th Avenue Theatre production of Lynn Ahrens and Stephen Flaherty’s Marie: A New Musical, running March 22-April 14 in Seattle. Directed and choreographed by Susan Stroman, the show was formerly titled Little Dancer upon its 2014 premiere at the Kennedy Center, in Washington, DC.Leading the company will be Tiler Peck as Marie, returning to the role she originated in Washington. Also reprising their performances will be Karen Ziemba as Martine Van Goethem, Jenny Powers as Antoinette Van Goethem, and Kyle Harris as Christian. New to the show are Terrence Mann as Edgar Degas, Louise Pitre as Adult Marie, Dee Hoty as Mary Cassat, Christopher Gurr as Corbeil and Degas Understudy, and Noelle Hogan as Charlotte Van Goethem. READ MORE Advertisement Advertisementlast_img read more