Smith dazzles, Bravo holds nerve as Lions win IPL thriller

first_imgNEW DELHI, India (CMC):West Indies opener Dwayne Smith stroked an up tempo half-century, while seamer Dwayne Bravo remained calm under pressure to bowl a decent final over as Gujarat Lions held on to beat Delhi Daredevils by a single run in the Indian Premier League here yesterday.Playing at the Feroz Shah Kotla Stadium, Lions piled up 172 for six after being sent in, with the right-handed Smith carving out 53 and opening partner Brendan McCullum top-scoring with 60.In reply, South African Chris Morris hammered a career-best unbeaten 82 to get the hosts within touching distance of their target.However, with 14 runs required from the final over, Bravo managed to hold his nerve and see the visitors over the line.The victory was Lions’ fifth in six outings and it pushed them top of the standings on 10 points, two ahead of the chasing Kolkata Knight Riders. Delhi, meanwhile, remained third on six points.FLYING STARTSmith and McCullum gave Lions a flying start, putting on 112 off 64 deliveries.In only his second game of the IPL, Smith faced 30 deliveries and clobbered five fours and three sixes, while New Zealander McCullum hit six sixes and three sixes in a 36-ball knock.Smith eventually fell in the 11th over when he missed one from leg-spinner Imran Tahir, which skidded on and was lbw. His wicket signalled a collapse, which saw six wickets tumble from 30 runs.Seamer Dhawal Kulkarni then grabbed three wickets to stun Delhi and leave them on 16 for three in the fourth over before Morris and JP Duminy, with 48 off 43 balls, came to their rescue. Morris faced only 32 balls and slammed four fours and eight sixes, while Duminy hit three fours and a six off 43 deliveries.Bravo claimed one for 40 from his four overs, but more important, managed to keep Morris quiet in the final over.last_img read more

Maribor v Chelsea: Drogba starts, Costa among the substitutes

first_imgDidier Drogba starts up front for Chelsea in their Champions League game in Slovenia, while Kurt Zouma is at centre-back alongside skipper John Terry and Petr Cech is in goal.Diego Costa is on the Blues bench, as are Gary Cahill and the fit-again Ramires.Chelsea: Cech; Ivanovic, Zouma, Terry, Filipe Luis; Matic, Fabregas; Schurrle, Willian, Hazard; Drogba. Subs: Courtois, Cahill, Azpilicueta, Ramires, Oscar, Salah, Costa.Follow West London Sport on TwitterFind us on Facebooklast_img

Tata Consultancy expands in SA

first_img31 October 2007Global information technology (IT) services provider and outsourcing company Tata Consultancy Services (TCS) has in partnership with an empowerment partner launched a local subsidiary, TCS South Africa, to strengthen and expand its operations in the country.“We see South Africa as a key strategic market for TCS and also as a gateway to southern and central Africa,” TCS chief executive and managing director Subramaniam Ramadorai said in a statement last week.“Through our own subsidiary, we will be well-placed to contribute to the economic growth of the country and its businesses by bringing in global best practices and world-class technology solutions.”TCS is part of the US$29-billion Tata Group, which already has extensive operations in South Africa through subsidiaries like Tata Motors, Tata Steel and VSNL, which is the largest single shareholder in South Africa’s second landline operator, Neotel.Ramadorai said the new model would help the company make a greater contribution to the South African economy by investing in the skills of its IT professionals by providing world-class training, and also bringing global best practices to help increase the competitiveness of South African businesses.Opening a subsidiary is also in line with TCS’s global strategy to have a direct presence in the countries in which it operates.The statement adds that TCS South Africa will have equity participation from local black economic empowerment groups to ensure a high level of social governance and localisation of services and skills.“To help its customers in South Africa, TCS has already created a near-shore delivery capability in Johannesburg, from where we are providing support services for our financial services products implemented in South Africa,” TCS chief operating officer N Chandrasekaran said.“The South African operations will emerge as a hub to serve customers in the southern and central parts of Africa.”TCS already does business in South Africa, with the government as well as with leading companies in the banking and financial services, manufacturing, energy, telecommunications and retail sectors.SAinfo reporter Want to use this article in your publication or on your website?See: Using SAinfo materiallast_img read more

Middle class ‘key to Africa’s growth’

first_img24 July 2013 Africa may be the world’s next growth frontier, but the continent is still confronted with fluctuating commodity prices, rising inequality and youth unemployment, says President Jacob Zuma. Over the last decade, six of the world’s 10 fastest growing economies were in Africa, with the World Bank stating recently that almost half of the countries on the continent had attained middle-class income status. “Despite this achievement, there is still severe poverty and inequality in many parts of the continent, Zuma told the Forbes Africa Forum 2013 in Congo-Brazzaville on Tuesday. Abundant natural resources, the growing consumer power of an emerging middle class and a youthful population were among the continent’s key development drivers, offering enormous potential for sustainable economic growth and development.Growing middle class Zuma said the African middle class could be a key player in finding solutions to the challenges facing the continent. Research findings by the McKinsey Global Institute, a consulting firm, define middle-class households as those with incomes of US$20 000 per year or more. Data compiled by the World Bank and the African Development Bank puts the number of middle-class Africans at 350-million out of a total population of approximately 875-million. Countries counted among those with the largest middle-class populations are South Africa, Kenya, Ghana and Angola. “The growth demonstrates that we are making progress in improving the quality of life and extending opportunities to those who were oppressed only 19 years ago before the dawn of freedom,” Zuma said, referring to South Africa. Research by the University of Cape Town’s Unilever Institute of Strategic Marketing estimates that South Africa’s black middle class has more than doubled in the past eight years, from 1.7-million South Africans in 2004 to an estimated 4.2-million in 2012. Zuma said the growth of the middle class was good for Africa, as it meant a growth in a population with skills to help manage the economy.Infrastructure development Infrastructure, Zuma added, would also play an important role in boosting the continent’s growth. “Infrastructure development will help lower transport costs and ensure that people, goods and services are able to move more effectively and efficiently throughout the continent. “Roads, bridges, rail lines, pipelines, power plants, ICT connectivity, cables, ports, and water-ways are the underpinning arteries of growth.” It was for this reason that the African Union (AU) had adopted the Programme for Infrastructure Development in Africa, which is being led by the AU Commission, the secretariat of the New Partnership for Africa’s Development (Nepad) and the African Development Bank. Zuma said, however, it was difficult to accurately project the capital cost of the implementation of long-term infrastructure projects, with costs estimated at more than $360-billion until the year 2040. “I wish to encourage the private sector representatives present here today, especially those from Africa, to become more involved in the development of infrastructure on the African continent. The benefits are immense. “The establishment of strategic linkages between the African and international companies will be most helpful in the transfer of skills, knowledge and technology.” Source: SAnews.gov.zalast_img read more

It is up to every one of us to sell South Africa

first_img“If we are serious about marketing the country to the world, we must engage the brand ambassadors who are ordinary South Africans,” says Brand South Africa’s Wendy Tlou. (Image: Brand South Africa) • Brand South Africa infobrandsouthafrica.com PO Box 87168, Houghton, 2041 Tel: +27 11 483 0122 Fax: +27 11 483 0124 • National Development Plan: Utopian dream, practical blueprint • Forum focuses on active citizenship • A freedom timeline: 20 years of democracy • Mandela Day has improved South Africa’s generosity • Infographic: Vision 2030 and the National Development PlanWendy TlouBranding a nation is like branding a sugary beverage or a pop star (even those with questionable talents). The goal is the same: maximise brand value and remain relevant to your audience.Like any brand, nations change, values change and so should the message about the chosen or perceived brand identity.If we are serious about marketing South Africa, we must be clear about what our values are.Branding South Africa is critical to the future of the country for the trite reason of competitiveness and much-needed direct foreign investment.The process of brand development and leveraging the value the brand brings without engaging the diverse people of the country is a plan that is sure to fail.That we have not invested in the exercise of ingraining a common vision that will inform our overall brand as a nation may be seen as a sign that we are not serious enough about how we market South Africa to its own people and to the rest of the world.We are taking chances. In sustainable marketing, buying our own hype is not an option – our marketing ingredient has to be real, otherwise anything else will see us pay dearly in the long run.Branding a country or state, and branding a nation, are mutually exclusive tasks.A credible country can exist without a strong nation, but a country is stronger with the existence of a powerful national brand, an inclusive one at that.Central to a nation is a shared and common culture.A culture that is not limited to whether you are from the north or speak a particular language, but rather a culture of common understanding, one where we uphold the fundamental values that allow all the people of and in South Africa to be who they are, without anyone infringing on their rights.A culture that embodies the ideal that together we are stronger, but divided we are vulnerable.We must address the fact that South Africans are inherently polarised and are thus unable to effectively develop and own a common culture, due to our race and class differences.I suppose it is safer to talk about this after a hotly contested election. Perhaps we don’t trust one another to believe in the same ideals.The impact of partisan politics is perhaps the biggest contributor to lack of unity.Our overall disinterest in the national narrative makes it easy for us to be sold bogus ideas by entities who have only self-interest and profit-making at heart.We are so desperate that the smell of meat on a braai and the ephemeral excitement derived from sport has become our assumed identity, our brand as a nation.While we must celebrate how we embraced one another over the past 20 years during huge sporting events that we had the privilege to host, we do have to ask ourselves whether there was enough follow-through to maintain such a momentum.One would have hoped that there was no better time than the celebration of 20 years after democracy to rectify the error.Can we honestly say that we are underselling the story of our 20 years of achievement?The legacy and brand of Nelson Mandela, our progressive constitution, Table Mountain and hosting the World Cup, among others, are too limited tools in our arsenal to fulfil our mission of achieving solid leadership and dominance on the continent, remaining the gateway to the rest of Africa.They are too limited to ensure we are respected and unmatched – not only because of what we have done, but because of what we are focusing on and investing in for future generations.Being a breathtakingly beautiful country alone is not enough.Knowledge, innovation and excellence are fundamental to any brand.The Americans are arrogant in their pursuit of maintaining global dominance.They are unequivocal about being the standard.They are unrivalled in terms of education, innovation, sports and military capability.They say and believe that they lead because no one else will – and they back it up.Why are we unable to strive for the same on the continent and have the vision, political will and hard work to back it up?We may not be there right now, but a systematic and inspired effort to get there, an aggressive crafting of a new narrative around a collective move to fix our education system and making South Africa a safer and more secure country is just as sexy a story as that of the Big Five at Kruger and the wonderful wines in and around Stellenbosch.For this, decisive and uncompromising leadership from the top is required. We must identify key areas of focus that place us shoulders above other large economies that are a real threat to our economic prowess and leadership on the continent. These focus areas must guarantee returns and have an effect in a relatively short amount of time.The strategy of having several focus areas is ineffective, because South Africans are impatient.We want results now.The concept of planning decades ahead and working for tomorrow is not what we preach.The high levels of instant gratification in the private lives of South Africans are indicative of this challenge. This stifles our potential to create credible institutions, led by brilliant minds, to include in the brand value we offer the world. We want to know that there is imminent change that is not dependent on who will occupy the highest office in the land, but on the will of South Africans – and that it will serve their interests first and foremost. We need to attach equal importance to the development and encouragement of citizen loyalty and efforts to attract foreign investment.When South Africans are proud and committed to the development of the country, everyone will do their bit to ensure that those interested in investing do so with the kind of confidence that will encourage long-term investment in several sectors.Featuring locals in television adverts is cute, but it is not enough to make the project of marketing South Africa, to South Africans and abroad, exceptional.Properly integrate South Africans in the branding and marketing of their own country. Get more people to participate in keeping the cities and villages clean, not just for visitors, but also for themselves, so that they are also proud of their country.Brand Proudly South African must be given life from our products, content and – importantly – through the lives of ordinary South Africans.Let us be honest and clear about who we want in our country, what they bring and how they can help solidify Brand South Africa.When we are marketing South Africa, do we have in mind the Ivy League graduate looking to do exciting and innovative work in Africa, or the less skilled miners from Zimbabwe?The Ivy League graduate is just as valuable as the miner – however, their contribution to the development of the country is different.We expect that their economic activity will significantly benefit key industries, including tourism, which continues to perform positively in parts of the country.But without a stronger message about prioritising safety, security and reliable infrastructure, we will not be able to attract the calibre of visitors that our economy needs to grow at levels that we need.We must be unapologetic in the pursuit for quality individuals to make South Africa their professional and economic home. If not, we merely overburden ourselves by taking on more people to cater for.The pressure under which public facilities find themselves cannot be understated. If we are serious about marketing the country to the world, we must engage the brand ambassadors who are ordinary South Africans.Limiting our potential to aesthetics is problematic – we can create, we can think and we must tell the world this. We can charm and impress with more than just a three-minute video of pretty South Africa on YouTube.Tlou writes in her personal capacity. During the day she is the marketing and communications director for Brand South Africa.last_img read more

EPA announces RFS levels

first_imgShare Facebook Twitter Google + LinkedIn Pinterest The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) recently announced the final 2018 Renewable Volume Obligation (RVO) under the Renewable Fuel Standard (RFS).Kevin Skunes, president of the National Corn Growers Association (NCGA), said his organization was generally pleased with the ethanol levels in the announcement.“NCGA is pleased to see the EPA meet the Administration’s commitment to keep the RFS on track when it comes to conventional ethanol. Not only has EPA hit the mark with the 15 billion-gallon implied target, but EPA has also improved on the proposed rule by correctly growing the total 2018 volume from the 2017 level as intended in the RFS,” Skunes said. “This year’s corn crop is bigger than anyone anticipated, resulting in the largest carryover supply in 30 years. Farmers want to rely on the marketplace for their income, and ethanol has been critical in our effort to increase profitable demand for U.S. corn.“While we are concerned that the RVO number for cellulosic ethanol is not set higher than the 2017 volume, we are encouraged EPA raised the level by 50 million gallons above its July proposal. Moving forward, we ask EPA to revisit the growth in cellulosic fuel production, particularly as first-generation ethanol producers expand cellulosic gallons made from feedstocks such as corn kernel fiber.”The numbers also stagnated biodiesel requirements at 2.1 billion gallons, well short of the industry’s capacity. The final RVOs are an improvement over proposed RVOs issued earlier this year, yet they fall short of maintaining Congress’ intent to drive growth in the American biofuels industry, according to National Farmers Union (NFU) President Roger Johnson.“While it’s clear EPA made an attempt to reverse some of their flawed proposals from earlier this year, the improvements to the finalized volume obligations are meager and deeply disappointing. The agency missed a significant opportunity to follow through on the administration’s promises to advance the interests of American family farmers, their communities, and the biofuel industry,” Johnson said. “The RFS was written to promote expanded use of homegrown, renewable biofuels. So long as EPA continues to fail to meet that congressional intent, they’ll continue to shortchange our nation’s family farmers, rural communities, consumers and the environment.”last_img read more

A Great Experience at the West Coast Green Booth

first_imgOne thing I like about trade shows is that I get an opportunity to talk to customers and potential customers. But the cool part is that all I have to do is be honest and answer questions. There’s no real sales pitch because I’m confident that Green Building Advisor can help them. If not, I point them to the publication that can — _Environmental Building News_, _Fine Homebuilding_, or the bookstore right next to our booth where _GreenSpec_ is on sale.A very skeptical engineer was humoring me as I tried to work into my ‘non-sales pitch.’ He wasn’t skeptical of green building, he was skeptical of green building information. He thought we were greenwashers.I knew this engineer wasn’t interested, so I just struck up a conversation and abandoned the pitch. I pulled my hands away from the laptop and backed away. “Show me what you think is coolest on this site,” he said, so I dug in to the encyclopedia of green building, which is something I spent a lot of time on during development. I showed him the landing page for the Green Building Encyclopedia and explained that we organized the information the way people build houses rather than the way Green Rating systems rate them. This made sense to him.He seemed a little surprised at the sheer number of articles; when he saw the depth, he started to get it. He asked me who wrote all this stuff and I told him former _Fine Homebuilding_ editors, except the landscape section, which was written by a former _Fine Gardening_ editor. This struck a chord with him because he has a lot of respect for Fine Homebuilding.I clicked into a page that I had already visited (water heating ) because I knew it would load quickly — we had a not-so-fast wireless connection. He was drawn in further. “Let me look at something that’s applicable to me,” he said, so I let him drive. He clicked into the slab page and saw good informational preliminaries.Then he scrolled down. There he saw some construction detail thumbnail images. “Are these some of the construction details you have?” Yes, would you like to have a look at that library?” We clicked Strategies and Details and then worked into the slab section. He liked the details, and began muttering things like “Wow” under his breath.When I showed him My GBA, he said “Wow” again, but loud enough for others around us to hear. Another guy that had walked up just moments before started paying closer attention. “Is this any good?” the new guy said; the engineer said, “Yes, this is very cool.”Nice to get good feedback from skeptics.last_img read more

BANGLADESH ELECT TO FIELD AGAINST INDIA IN WORLD CUP OPENER

first_imgBangaldesh won the toss and elected to field against India in the World Cup 2011 opener on Saturday at Sher-e-Bangla National Stadium in Mirpur.Sreesanth to play in place of Ashish Nehra, who was ruled due to back injurylast_img