Roger Waters Announces New Album “Is This The Life We Really Want?” With Teaser Video

first_imgRoger Waters has been hinting at a new album for some time now, even recently posting a photo with Radiohead producer Nigel Godrich together in the studio. Today he confirms new music with an official announcement. Dubbed Is This the Life We Really Want?, the upcoming project comes 25 years after the Pink Floyd bassist’s most recent solo album, Amused To Death(1992).The announcement came strong with a video on his Facebook page, with a sample of the new music over a video that eventually displays the album title Is This the Life We Really Want?. With no other details, Rogers promises the album is “coming soon.” The album title seems to hint that there will be some political dialogue, as Rogers has been an outspoken voice against political corruption for decades – even recently sharing official footage of the “Pigs (Three Different Ones)” performance on Inauguration Day with the caption “A note from Roger: The resistance begins today.” Get a taste of what to expect from the new album below:Waters is currently preparing for his upcoming Us And Them North American tour, which kicks off end of May and extends through late October. The tour is named after the iconic song on 1973 Pink Floyd album Dark Side Of The Moon, on which Waters recently reflected in an interview with NPR. Waters says, “I was listening to [the song] the other day. There’s a line which goes, ‘With, without, and who’ll deny that’s what the fighting’s all about?’ And the answer to the question is this: Almost everyone. Almost everyone will deny that ‘with/without’ is what the fighting’s all about. My contention is that it is. That’s why my new tour is going to be called ‘Us and Them.’ It’s specifically about that line.”Waters promises a mixture of Pink Floyd songs, solo material, and songs from the upcoming album! Check out the full tour schedule below.Roger Waters Tour DatesMay 26, Kansas City, MO Sprint CenterMay 28, Louisville, KY KFC Yum! CenterMay 30, St. Louis, MO Scottrade CenterJune 1, Tulsa, OK BOK CenterJune 3, Denver, CO Pepsi CenterJune 7, San Jose, CA SAP Center at San JoseJune 12, Sacramento, CA Golden 1 CenterJune 14, Phoenix, AZ Gila River ArenaJune 16, Las Vegas, NV T-Mobile ArenaJune 20, Los Angeles, CA STAPLES CenterJune 21, Los Angeles, CA STAPLES CenterJune 24, Seattle, WA Tacoma DomeJuly 3, Dallas, TX American Airlines CenterTBD San Antonio, TX AT&T CenterJuly 6, Houston, TX Toyota CenterJuly 11, Tampa, FL Amalie ArenaJuly 13, Miami, FL American Airlines ArenaJuly 16, Atlanta, GA Infinite Energy CenterJuly 18, Greensboro, NC Greensboro ColiseumJuly 20, Columbus, OH Nationwide ArenaJuly 22, Chicago, IL United CenterJuly 23, Chicago, IL United CenterJuly 26, St. Paul, MN Xcel Energy CenterAugust 2, Detroit, MI The Palace of Auburn HillsAugust 4, Washington, DC Verizon CenterAugust 8, Philadelphia, PA Wells Fargo CenterAugust 9, Philadelphia, PA Wells Fargo CenterSept. 7, Newark, NJ Prudential CenterSept. 11, Brooklyn, NY Barclays CenterSept. 12, Brooklyn, NY Barclays CenterSept. 15, Uniondale, NY Nassau ColiseumSept. 19, Pittsburgh, PA PPG Paints ArenaSept. 27, Boston, MA TD GardenSept. 28, Boston, MA TD GardenOct. 2, Toronto, ON Air Canada CentreOct. 3, Toronto, ON Air Canada CentreOct. 6, Quebec City, QC Videotron CentreOct. 10, Ottawa, ON Canadian Tire CentreOct. 16, Montreal, QC Bell CentreTBD Winnipeg, MB MTS CentreOct. 24, Edmonton, AB Rogers PlaceOct. 28, Vancouver, BC Rogers Arena,Waters promises a mixture of Pink Floyd songs, solo material, and songs from the upcoming album! Check out the full tour schedule below.Roger Waters Tour DatesMay 26, Kansas City, MO Sprint CenterMay 28, Louisville, KY KFC Yum! CenterMay 30, St. Louis, MO Scottrade CenterJune 1, Tulsa, OK BOK CenterJune 3, Denver, CO Pepsi CenterJune 7, San Jose, CA SAP Center at San JoseJune 12, Sacramento, CA Golden 1 CenterJune 14, Phoenix, AZ Gila River ArenaJune 16, Las Vegas, NV T-Mobile ArenaJune 20, Los Angeles, CA STAPLES CenterJune 21, Los Angeles, CA STAPLES CenterJune 24, Seattle, WA Tacoma DomeJuly 3, Dallas, TX American Airlines CenterTBD San Antonio, TX AT&T CenterJuly 6, Houston, TX Toyota CenterJuly 11, Tampa, FL Amalie ArenaJuly 13, Miami, FL American Airlines ArenaJuly 16, Atlanta, GA Infinite Energy CenterJuly 18, Greensboro, NC Greensboro ColiseumJuly 20, Columbus, OH Nationwide ArenaJuly 22, Chicago, IL United CenterJuly 23, Chicago, IL United CenterJuly 26, St. Paul, MN Xcel Energy CenterAugust 2, Detroit, MI The Palace of Auburn HillsAugust 4, Washington, DC Verizon CenterAugust 8, Philadelphia, PA Wells Fargo CenterAugust 9, Philadelphia, PA Wells Fargo CenterSept. 7, Newark, NJ Prudential CenterSept. 11, Brooklyn, NY Barclays CenterSept. 12, Brooklyn, NY Barclays CenterSept. 15, Uniondale, NY Nassau ColiseumSept. 19, Pittsburgh, PA PPG Paints ArenaSept. 27, Boston, MA TD GardenSept. 28, Boston, MA TD GardenOct. 2, Toronto, ON Air Canada CentreOct. 3, Toronto, ON Air Canada CentreOct. 6, Quebec City, QC Videotron CentreOct. 10, Ottawa, ON Canadian Tire CentreOct. 16, Montreal, QC Bell CentreTBD Winnipeg, MB MTS CentreOct. 24, Edmonton, AB Rogers PlaceOct. 28, Vancouver, BC Rogers Arenalast_img read more

NDSP investigates attempted rape report

first_imgNotre Dame Security Police (NDSP) is investigating an attempted rape reported Monday, according to an email sent to students Monday evening. The reported sexual assault occurred in a men’s residence hall on North Quad late Friday or in the early morning hours Saturday, police said. The assault was committed by an acquaintance of the victim. NDSP said it has no evidence this case is connected with the incident described in the Crime Alert email it sent to the student body Saturday. In the email, police warned students of the risk of sexual assault. “Sexual assault can happen to anyone,” the email stated. “College students are more likely to be assaulted by an acquaintance than a stranger. This means that the person perpetrating the assault could be part of the campus community. “Being aware of your own safety and watching out for your friends are important steps you can take to reduce the risk of sexual assault.” Information about sexual assault prevention and resources for survivors of sexual assault are available online from NDSP and the Committee on Sexual Assault Prevention.last_img read more

“Global Peanut Research”

As the federal government ponders the future of farm programs, one research group is preparing for life with or without price supports. The Peanut Collaborative Research Support Program is finding worldwide solutions now that may help Georgia farmers in the future. “Peanuts are a global crop with global problems,” said John Williams, assistant program director of the Peanut CRSP at the University of Georgia Agricultural Experiment Station in Griffin. “Peanuts have leaf spot wherever they grow,” he said. “Wherever peanuts are grown, used or stored, aflatoxin is a problem. The research we support in utilization has no boundaries. Some of it is focused on small producers, but that’s scale. Those technologies can be scaled up much easier than scaled down.” The Peanut CRSP uses international research to solve the global and domestic problems of growing peanuts. “The Peanut CRSP is the outcome of an act of Congress to deploy the skills and knowledge of the land-grant system for development,” Williams said. “The goal is to achieve peanut technology that helps both developing countries and the United States.” One of the program’s major focuses is creating new peanut products. “Developing products outside the United States promotes consumption, which encourages exports and trade,” Williams said. Scientists at the UGA Center for Food Safety and Quality Enhancement in Griffin add to the program. They’ve focused on product development in the Philippines and Thailand and post-harvest handling and storage in Jamaica and Belize. In 1996, a new project began in Bulgaria. One of the greatest possibilities for U.S. farmers is oil. “The potential is spectacular for peanuts,” Williams said. “The oil from peanuts, from a health perspective, equals the quality of olive oil.” Olive oil sells for three to four times the price of other oils. “We’re working to help expand that quality market. And we’re going to be promoting these desirable high-oleic oils so people move to frying with healthier oils,” Williams said. “The general peanut oil isn’t as healthy as canola or olive oil. But these new ones are,” he said. “They match very closely with olive oil’s health qualities. Down the road, it’s going to be really important.” The CRSP research also enables farmers to grow peanuts with lower input costs. “On a global scale, a sustained development of technologies has led to better varieties,” Williams said. “There are a number of components of that. One is developing and accessing germ plasm. Many of the problems with peanuts have cheap solutions in the genetics.” That long-term investment into resistance is going to be important. “The people outside the United States have been more concerned up until now, because they’ve had to compete on a world-price basis,” he said. “So for them, cheap technology to control diseases has a greater priority than here.” The long-term survival of the American peanut industry may depend on using such technology. “Certainly it could help reduce chemical inputs,” he said. “And you will have to use other technologies like integrated pest management that use resistance, management techniques and a small amount of chemicals.” One of the CRSP successes is research that takes genes from wild relatives and puts them into peanuts to create resistances. Farmers now can buy varieties resistant to leaf spot disease, which costs Georgia farmers $100 to $150 per acre per year for chemical control. “The opportunity is there through resistances to cut that to $50 per acre,” Williams said. The Peanut CRSP can show a $10 U.S. return for every $1 spent from the release of new varieties, he said. “When the program was started there was a great deal of cry about why Congress was spending all this money to make other countries more competitive,” Williams said. “That probably has changed.” read more

NEC Energy installs Europe’s largest battery storage system

first_img FacebookTwitterLinkedInEmailPrint分享Microgrid Knowledge:Boston-based NEC Energy Solutions (NEC) has completed installation of Europe’s largest battery system, 48-MW of energy storage that will provide reactive power in Germany to stabilize the transmission grid.NEC developed the project in Jardelund for German company EnspireME, a joint venture between Japan’s Mitsubishi and Eneco, a Netherlands-based renewable energy company. With 50 MWh of capacity, the system uses 10,000 lithium-ion battery modules, enough to store power for about 5,300 German households for 24 hours.The battery system can play multiple roles to strengthen the grid. It will earn revenue by serving the primary reserve market. This opportunity exists because Europe’s transmission system operators must secure a certain number of capacity reserves to prepare for sudden power loss or an extensive blackout.EnspireME will sell storage capacity to the German electricity market through weekly common auctions where European grid operators purchase reserve capacity to guarantee a 50 hertz frequency on the grid.The energy storage system can also take over the role of primary reserve provider and become a more sustainable alternative to coal and gas-fired plants. In addition, the project can serve local wind farms by allowing them to store excess electricity generated during periods when they cannot sell their output into markets because of excess supply.More: NEC installs Europe’s largest battery system NEC Energy installs Europe’s largest battery storage systemlast_img read more

Another Edition of the “Press Correspondent” Course Completed in Uruguay

first_imgBy Nastasia Barceló/Diálogo September 23, 2016 The National Peace Operations Training Institute of Uruguay (ENOPU per its Spanish acronym), and the Uruguayan Army’s Department of Social Communication, jointly organized another edition of the “Press Correspondent” course, which took place from August 15th to 18th. The course was divided into two days: theoretical lessons at ENOPU and two practical activities at the Sixth Abra de Castellanos Military Camp. During the theoretical classes, participants learned about the current situation of the peacekeeping missions in the Congo and Haiti, where Uruguayan Armed Forces are participating, among others. Instructors from the Uruguayan Navy, Air Force, and Army were present. During this first day, participants also learned about humanitarian demining, preventive health measures, negotiation, and basic equipment. Official Army sources highlighted the presence of well-known local journalists such as Martín Sarthou, who shared his extensive personal and work experience in conflict zones with those present. Among the participants was Ensign Mariana Meza, who works in the Army’s Department of Social Communication. She stressed that “professionals from relevant Uruguayan media outlets and three professionals from foreign media channels participated, as well as students from journalism schools from both the University of the Republic and private institutions like the Catholic University of Uruguay.” Ensign Meza added that “The main objective was to give the journalists the tools they need to work in a hostile environment and to provide them with life-saving techniques for different scenarios, whether it be during a negotiation or a direct assault.” However, “the course was also geared towards informing the students about the tasks and the functions that our country has during peacekeeping missions, as well as the specific characteristics about where the armed forces are present,” she concluded. Engineers in action The course’s practical activities took place during the afternoons of August 16th and 17th at the Abra Military Camp. The Engineer Instruction Center provided instructors and specialists in areas such as humanitarian demining and water purification. In order to hone their observation skills, they debated situations which the communications professionals could face while covering the news in certain conflict areas. The Air Force also explained how to correctly board a military helicopter. Humanitarian demining and water purification In relation to humanitarian demining instruction, participants attended theoretical/practical classes on characteristics of demining, such as the types of mines and equipment used and how they work. The specialists also held demonstrations on how to react when faced with an explosion. Likewise, they watched demonstrations on water purification and learned how a portable water purifier works in remote areas where there is no electricity. It is a system that can produce 1 gallon/3.8 liters of potable water per minute from sources of freshwater such as wells, lakes, ponds, rivers, and flooded areas. In the Abra de Castellanos area, students had the opportunity to observe deployment in mission areas, the transport of armored vehicles, checkpoint procedures, night vision goggle use, and proper handling of security elements. Civil-military cooperation The Press Correspondent course is well known among journalists and military members throughout Uruguay. Ensign Meza pointed out that, historically, “officers invite journalists from Uruguay to travel with them and embed themselves in the missions’ military bases, offering journalists the chance to have access to places and situations they wouldn’t otherwise have the opportunity to access by themselves.” For his part, Uruguayan journalist Martin Sarthou stressed the importance of educational programs like these: “They provide more freedom and security to the correspondents who work in the field where there are Uruguayan military contingents. At the same time, our work provides a first-hand account of the work carried out by the peacekeeping missions.” He also said that “the only restrictions that the Army has placed on us journalists are the ones that have to do with safety measures concerning security in conflict zones. What we are trying to avoid is for a reporter to become a martyr for their profession merely because they don’t know the dangers that can exist in peace mission areas.”last_img read more

52 Evacuated After East Northport Fire

first_imgSign up for our COVID-19 newsletter to stay up-to-date on the latest coronavirus news throughout New York More than 50 people—including three families forced to temporarily move into a hotel—were evacuated from an East Northport building after a fire ripped through Friday afternoon. Suffolk County police said the blaze at the Larkfield Road commercial building, which is also connected to residential apartments, started in the rear work area of Vacuum Cleaners Sales and Service around 3 p.m. Three families—eight people in four apartments—were relocated by the Red Cross to the Hampton Inn in Commack, police said. Forty-two other residents were temporarily moved to a Salvation Army shelter until electricity and heat were restored to their apartments. The temperature was in the teens during much of the day Friday. In total, 52 residents were evacuated, police said. Investigators are still looking into the cause of the fire, but it doesn’t appear to be criminal, police said. Nobody was injured.last_img read more

Elmont Armed Home Invasion Trio Sought

first_imgSign up for our COVID-19 newsletter to stay up-to-date on the latest coronavirus news throughout New York Nassau County police are investigating an armed home invasion in Elmont that occurred two months ago, authorities said Tuesday in a wanted poster seeking the public’s help in solving the crime.Three masked men entered a Louis Avenue through an unlocked side door, walked upstairs, brandished black handguns and demanded money from the occupants at 9:30 p.m. Sunday, Nov. 15, police said.When the victims said they didn’t have any money, the assailants ordered a 13-year-old girl to lie on the floor and stole her iPhone before the trio fled on foot, police said.The suspects were described as black men. The first was wearing gray jeans, a gray bubble jacket, black wool hat and gloves. The second had a mustache and was wearing a gray hooded sweatshirt, a black vest, gray sweat pants, a gray ski mask and a gray hat. The third was wearing a gray hooded sweatshirt, black jeans, black gloves and a black ski mask.Crime Stoppers is asking anyone who knows the identity or whereabouts of the subjects, or anyone with any information about this crime to call 1-800-244-TIPS(8477).last_img read more

Your brand is your consumers

first_imgIn credit unions, we tend to spend a lot of time talking about what the brand says about us (our financial institution). This is certainly important as the brand must be an accurate reflection of your unique retail culture and environment.However, a critically important element of the brand mix is sometimes overlooked. What exactly does your brand say about your consumers? What does your brand (in its entirety) say about the men and women who choose your credit union as their financial institution? What does this say to them about themselves and, just as importantly, what does this say about them to their extended circle of friends, family and colleagues?Consumers choose to do business with a particular brand for a reason. Sometimes it’s price (think Southwest Airlines). Sometimes it’s ease of access (think Amazon). Sometimes it’s experience (think Disney). Often, it is a combination of these (and other) elements. So when creating and living your financial institution’s brand, you must consider what that choice represents about your consumers. Are they choosing you because you have the fastest loan turnaround decision time in town? Because you offer the most branches and/or the best online access? Or do they prefer you over the competition because of the unique cultural environment offered by your brand? continue reading » 12SHARESShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblrlast_img read more

Two companies outline employee antiviral programs

first_imgApr 20, 2007 (CIDRAP News) – Faced with the reality that an effective vaccine is not likely to be available for at least the first several months of an influenza pandemic, some corporations are buying antiviral medications for their employees—both to protect them and to improve the chances that the company could keep providing vital products and services through a pandemic.Few companies have revealed their plans concerning the use of antivirals, but two of them recently described their plans to supply employees with oseltamivir (Tamiflu): the US division of Roche, the company that makes Tamiflu, based in Nutley, N.J., and Public Service Enterprise Group (PSEG), an energy company that serves nearly 2 million electric customers and 1.6 million gas customers in New Jersey.Tamiflu is a neuraminidase inhibitor that the World Health Organization (WHO) recommends as the treatment of choice for people infected with H5N1 avian influenza; it is regarded as the best hope for treatment if H5N1 evolves into a pandemic strain. The WHO lists the other licensed neuraminidase inhibitor, zanamivir (Relenza), as a second option for treating H5N1.Roche and PSEG are among the first large companies to supply their employees with Tamiflu, and their experiences may hold lessons for other companies considering such programs.Employee antiviral programs gain momentumAntiviral programs for businesses range from modest stockpiles that would cover only certain at-risk employees to more comprehensive plans intended to cover all workers and even their families.Roche spokesman Terry Hurley told CIDRAP News that 350 corporations have purchased Tamiflu for their employees. Companies don’t order the drug directly from Roche; they obtain the medication either from distributors that ship it to a company clinic, from a pharmacy benefits manager (PBM) that mails the medication to employees, or from local pharmacies.The idea of companies supplying their employees with antiviral medication, however, has generated some controversy. When Roche rolled out a pandemic planning Web site last July to market Tamiflu to companies, some medical and policy experts charged that the company was favoring more lucrative corporate requests over government stockpile orders.Mike McGuire, vice president of anti-infectives for Roche, said the company waited until its production capacity reached 400 million treatment courses per year before following though with its employee program. The company’s US facilities can produce 80 million treatment courses annually, he said. “Once we filled a number of government orders around the world, had enough for seasonal orders, and had enough to fill our other orders, then we decided to fill our own,” he said.The decision to stockpile or supply antiviral medications isn’t an easy one for businesses. Medication cost is one factor to consider, said Stuart Weiss, MD, an emergency medicine physician, pediatrician, and disaster planning expert who has worked for government agencies and healthcare organizations. Also, employee antiviral programs should include a strong educational component and medical screening, which also add to program costs, he said.”Just giving someone a box of pills without the educational component is wrong,” said Weiss, who is a founding partner of MedPrep Consulting Group, based in New York City.Other factors that companies may weigh when considering an employee Tamiflu program include the drug’s 5-year shelf life and scientific uncertainty about efficacy and dosing against an emerging pandemic influenza strain. Antiviral-resistant H5N1 strains have been isolated from a few patients in Vietnam and Egypt. The WHO suggested this week that physicians might consider doubling the standard dosage of Tamiflu for H5N1 patients.Weiss said companies shouldn’t substitute an employee antiviral program for a comprehensive pandemic plan. “Just buying antivirals in a vacuum is a waste of time and resources,” he said. Plans to protect employees should also involve social distancing, personal protective equipment, and other mitigation strategies.Why now?Representatives from both Roche and PSEG said the decision to supply employees with Tamiflu represents the next step in their pandemic planning. “We need to still be able to produce lifesaving drugs [during a flu pandemic], and we’re extremely proactive,” McGuire said. The unpredictability of a pandemic drove Roche’s decision to have the drug ready for employees ahead of time. “We’re not even sure the doctors will be in their offices when the pandemic hits,” he said.Ronald Mack, MD, medical director at PSEG, based in Newark, N.J., said the company takes the threat of a pandemic very seriously. “We have been sensitized to this type of threat by our past experience responding to 9/11, SARS [severe acute respiratory syndrome], anthrax, the Northeast blackout [of August 2003], and the terrorist threats against downtown Newark,” he said.Implementing an employee Tamiflu program for a large organization takes time, Mack said. “We considered that it would be difficult to do for the first time under urgent circumstances, which would produce competition for resources, and elected to act now,” he said.Who receives it?All Roche employees are eligible to receive Tamiflu, said Ann Peterka, MD, the company’s director of employee health services. The company plan is intended both to maintain the company’s ability to continue producing essential drugs and to protect employees, she said.”We provided Tamiflu to all of our employees since everyone will be needed to get the business back to normal once a pandemic wave has subsided,” Peterka said. “And since we have a critical role in ensuring that we are able to supply Tamiflu to all of our stakeholders during a pandemic without interruption, it is important to protect our employees from getting infected so we have the best chance of accomplishing this objective.”Alex Nawotka, director of commercial operations at Roche, said covering all employees will help company operations return to normal more quickly after pandemic waves pass. “We felt that all of our employees are important in that effort,” he said.PSEG’s Tamiflu program also includes employees’ spouses, dependent children, and domestic partners, Mack said. The goals are to further protect employees and decrease their worries about their families during a pandemic, he said. “The sense is that our workers would not appear [for work] unless they felt that their families were secure. We are a very family-oriented company—multigenerational employment is not unusual,” he added.Neither company was willing to reveal how much Tamiflu would be supplied to each employee or family member.Steps for prescribingSources at both PSEG and Roche say the employee Tamiflu program is just one facet of a broader pandemic flu awareness program, and employees are educated before doctors screen and prescribe them the drug. Other elements include hygiene messages on hand washing and cough etiquette.Roche employees must complete a computerized educational module before they qualify for the Tamiflu program, Peterka said. After they finish the module, they meet with a company doctor who reviews their medical histories, clears them to receive the drug if no contraindications are found, and gives them Tamiflu packaging materials to review. Roche has contracted with a physician network that can do the screenings on- or off-site, she said.After an employee has completed the educational material and met with a physician, the prescription is sent to a PBM, which mails the employee his or her Tamiflu supply.At PSEG, employees attend one of several group information sessions, held February through May and led by physicians, Mack said. Employees complete three brief forms—a medical history, a privacy statement, and an education acknowledgement form—and meet individually with a physician. Those who are cleared to receive Tamiflu are given a supply of the drug, along with instructions for taking it.In June, after employee prescriptions are processed, said Mack, family members will go through a similar process to receive their supplies of Tamiflu.What triggers taking the drug?Another issue for employee antiviral programs is what to tell workers about when to take the drug. Using it for treatment means using it only during the illness, but taking it for prevention during a pandemic could mean taking it for many weeks. Roche and PSEG take different approaches on this point.Roche said its employee Tamiflu program follows World Health Organization guidelines for seasonal flu treatment and prevention (the WHO says that antivirals can be used preventively as well as for treatment). However, Peterka said employees are told to consult a medical practitioner before they take the drug. “We don’t want them self-diagnosing,” she said.Mack said for now PSEG intends for employees to use the antiviral medication to treat flu symptoms in the event of a known pandemic but not for prevention. “This may be modified if an actual pandemic evolves,” he said.Maintaining awarenessBoth companies said their Tamiflu programs are just one element of ongoing pandemic communication with employees. Mack said PSEG uses seasonal flu as “practice” for a pandemic; for example, the company makes it easy for employees to get their seasonal flu shots by offering them during work at company expense.Roche and PSEG have installed touchless water faucets and towel dispensers and have posted educational messages on proper handwashing techniques and cough etiquette.The Tamiflu program isn’t a one-shot educational push, Nowatka said. Some of the ongoing efforts at Roche are aimed at teaching employees the difference between seasonal flu, pandemic flu, and the common cold, he said. “We use a variety of venues: e-mail, kiosks, posters, and weekly newsletters,” he said.See also: WHO guidelines for pharmacologic management of H5N1 patients, May 2006Apr 19 WHO statement mentioning possible high-dose oseltamivir treatment for H5N1 patientslast_img read more

H5N1 hits Nepal for first time, strikes another Indian state

first_imgJan 20, 2009 (CIDRAP News) – Animal health workers in Nepal are culling thousands of poultry in response to the country’s first outbreak of H5N1 avian influenza, as officials in India said the virus spread to another Indian state, Sikkim in the northeastern part of the country.In a Jan 16 report to the World Organization for Animal Health (OIE), government officials in Nepal said the virus struck backyard poultry in a village in Jhapa district in the southeastern corner of the country. The outbreak killed 14 of 13,000 susceptible birds in the area.Investigators have not determined the source of the outbreak, the OIE report said.Laxman Hamal, a government administrator, said more than 10,000 chickens and ducks have been culled over the past 4 days, Agence France-Presse reported today. Hamal said officials have banned the sale, transport, consumption, and farming of poultry in the outbreak area for the next 3 months to control the spread of the virus.Elsewhere, a veterinary official in India’s Sikkim state said today that tests have revealed the H5N1 in dead poultry and wild birds, Reuters reported today. Sikkim, located in northeast India, is the country’s smallest state and borders West Bengal state, as well as Nepal and China, all of which have reported recent H5N1 outbreaks.Officials plan on culling about 15,000 chickens and ducks in Sikkim, the report said.India’s health ministry has sent a rapid response team to the area to conduct surveillance in nearby residents and has shipped oseltamivir (Tamiflu), masks, and other protective equipment to the area, the Times of India reported today.India has battled sporadic H5N1 outbreaks since 2006, most recently in several districts in West Bengal and Assam states.See also:Jan 16 OIE reportlast_img read more