Sevens Players hit the Surf on Gold Coast

first_img (L-R) Peter Tiberio, Jean Baptiste Gobelet, Jesse Parahi at Surfers Paradise beach ahead of the Sevens World Series Two days before the kick-off of the HSBC Sevens World Series 2011/12 at the Gold Coast Sevens, players from defending Series champions New Zealand, tournament hosts Australia and fellow challengers USA and France took to the surf in the first ‘Sevens: Around the World’ challenge.Solomon King (NZ), Jesse Parahi (AUS), Jean-Baptiste Gobelet (FRA) and Peter Tiberio (USA) teamed up for a lesson before taking to the waves on the stunning Gold Coast. GOLD COAST, AUSTRALIA – NOVEMBER 23: In this handout image provided by HSBC, (L-R) Peter Tiberio of USA, Jean Baptiste Gobelet of France and Jesse Parahi of Australia walk with surfboards at Surfers Paradise beach ahead of the IRB HSBC Sevens World Series on November 23, 2011 in Gold Coast, Australia. (Photo by Getty Images for HSBC). LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALScenter_img Over the coming season players from all the Sevens teams participating on the World Series will be given the chance to take part in the ‘Sevens: Around the World’ challenges in the lead-up to the nine rounds.Watch the Videolast_img read more

Saints and sinners: The weekend’s talking points

first_imgExeter are going great guns but this is one habit they need to break.On a plate: JJ Hanrahan scores for Saints at ExeterFor the latest Rugby World subscription offers, click here. Thank you and good night: Nick Evans thanks Quins fans after his final home Premiership game (Getty) TAGS: Highlight LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS THE SAINTSEvans aboveHarlequins fly-half Nick Evans got the weekend off to a cracking start with an immaculate performance in his farewell to the Twickenham Stoop. Watched by his wife Sally and his globe-crossing parents, he kicked 22 points as Harlequins swatted Wasps 32-13.Evans should be on everyone’s list of favourite players. At 36, he’s lost the pace that once made him the quickest guy in any team he cared to play for, but he remains an unflappable guiding hand at the tiller.Lady luck was smiling on him when he threw a pass that was nearly intercepted by Kurtley Beale. Instead, it reached Chris Robshaw and the flanker skilfully put Tim Visser over for a try that changed the momentum just after half-time.Doing a runner: Nick Evans steps on the gas during Quins’ Premiership win against Wasps (Getty)Dan Carter’s presence meant Evans never had the Test career he deserved – he started only seven games for the All Blacks, out of 16 caps – but he stands on the highest plinth in the Quins pantheon.In his 207 senior appearances for the club since pitching up in 2008, he has scored 2,239 points – having overtaken Bob Hiller’s club record as long ago as 2013.“The word legend is overused but Nick is a legend at Harlequins,” said Quins’ director of rugby John Kingston. “He looked like he could have played until midnight.”Singing the praisesAcross the country other luminaries were gracing their home ground for the final time. Kelly Brown and Neil de Kock brought the curtain down on magnificent Saracens careers, ex-Scotland captain Brown singing Bon Jovi to the crowd at Allianz Park after Sarries came from behind to beat Bristol 27-9.“Kelly is one of the most selfless people you’ll ever meet, always putting the team first,” said DoR Mark McCall. “His decency and humility have always shone through in his time here.“Neil will be remembered as one of the true greats. His contribution over 11 years is hard to put into words.”Loyal servant: Saracens flanker Kelly Brown leaves the Allianz Park field for the last time (Getty)Army manoeuvresBrown’s duties in Hendon meant he was unable to be at Twickenham for the 100th edition of the Army-Navy match. The Royal Navy team he helps coach went down 29-20 as the British Army regained the title they last won in 2014.The Navy at least had the satisfaction of stopping Semesa Rokoduguni from crossing their try-line after the England wing had notched ten tries against them in his five previous meetings.Rokoduguni, a tank driver with the Royal Scots Dragoon Guards, turned provider in his less familiar full-back role and how wonderful that Bath DoR Todd Blackadder happily released him for both the Army’s Inter-Service Championship matches after the less helpful approach of his predecessor at Bath.Military precision: The Army win a lineout during their Babcock Trophy win at Twickenham (Getty)A blizzard of bonus pointsThere was a spot of confusion about this stat but Exeter have now taken the maximum 40 points possible from their last seven Premiership matches – a feat no club has achieved before.Not since drawing 13-13 at Saracens on 7 January have they failed to bag the full haul, since when they have scored 35, 48, 36, 34, 30, 38, 39 and 36 points – a remarkable sequence.Jack Nowell scored one of the Chiefs’ six tries in the 36-12 defeat of Northampton at Sandy Park and was hailed by Dave Flatman as “the best player on the field by about 500 miles. Chris Ashton used to be the yardstick for work-rate off the wing but Jack Nowell now takes that prize. He looked like a starting Lion all day long”.Running riot: Ian Whitten on his way to one of Exeter’s half-dozen tries against Northampton (Getty)The wisdom of ToddTaulupe Faletau was another who did no harm to his Lions Test chances, scoring a hat-trick and winning Man of the Match as Bath clobbered Gloucester 44-20.Todd Blackadder’s sanity had been questioned after he omitted George Ford and Jonathan Joseph from the Bath line-up, but the New Zealander got it spot on. Rhys Priestland and Max Clark played their parts perfectly and Bath set up a tantalizing final weekend.Good call: Todd Blackadder’s decision to leave out two England stars paid dividends (Getty)The relegation issue is decided but elsewhere there is intrigue everywhere you look. The top three are separated by only two points so third-placed Saracens could claim a home semi-final if they win at leaders Wasps.Second-placed Exeter travel to a Gloucester team still in the hunt for seventh spot, which would qualify them for the Champions Cup qualifying play-offs should they not secure their involvement by winning the Challenge Cup. Northampton, lying seventh, can leapfrog Harlequins above them by beating the Londoners at Franklin’s Gardens this weekend.Bath, trailing fourth-placed Leicester by four points, retain hopes of reaching the semi-finals but will need the results of the Sale-Bath and Worcester-Leicester games to swing improbably in their favour.What are you doing at 4pm on Saturday? It’s going to be a hell of a finish to the regular season.Top four sortedThe Guinness Pro12 is a simpler affair. The Ospreys’ 24-10 win over Ulster, coupled with the Scarlets’ scintillating 30-8 success at Connacht, means that barring a miracle Wales will have two teams in the semi-finals for the first time.Play-offs here we come: Jonathan Davies makes a flying tackle during Scarlets’ win in Galway (Inpho)Ulster trail the Ospreys by five points and cannot overhaul them on number of wins, so would have to rein in a points difference of 73 to squeeze into the top four. Sport is unpredictable but not that unpredictable.Cardiff Blues and Connacht look set to enter the play-off system, the Blues playing an English club and Connacht facing a French club on 19-21 May. The victors will meet on 26-28 May to see who gets the final spot in next season’s Champions Cup.THE SINNERSMatu’u case under scrutinySome people are rather hasty in leaping on the concussion bandwagon but, as BT Sport commentator Alastair Eykyn said at the time, the actions surrounding Moto Matu’u’s involvement at Bath didn’t look right.Gloucester’s replacement hooker collided with Taulupe Faletau and looked like he’d been knocked out as he fell to the ground. Even if we were mistaken in that, the mere suspicion of unconsciousness is enough to demand a player’s immediate withdrawal from the field.Centre of controversy: Gloucester’s Motu Matu’u, seen here v Quins, was in the news at Bath (Getty)Instead, Matu’u eventually got up and made his way to a lineout on the opposite side of the pitch – having set off in the wrong direction – before taking his leave a minute later, presumably after someone on the sidelines had seen footage of the incident.He should never have played on but it was quickly rectified. We assumed his match was done but no, ten minutes later he was back on having passed his Head Injury Assessment. Asked to explain that decision, Gloucester DoR David Humphreys said Motu’u had a stinger and then passed the standard HIA protocol, so returned.The oft-cited message ‘If in doubt, sit them out’ would have been worth adhering to in this instance.Stormer hard done by“Dead-set the most ludicrous thing I’ve seen in a game.” That’s how Kiwi commentator Scotty Stevenson described a decision by Glen Jackson in the Highlanders v Stormers Super Rugby match.It occurred after Highlanders loose forward Gareth Evans landed heavily at a lineout. A replay showed that he fell on Stormers prop Oli Kebble, who put out an arm to protect himself. He was yellow-carded.It wasn’t a game changer – the score was 7-7 but Highlanders ran out easy 57-14 winners – but it was a weird decision.“Okay, I’m not perfect!” Top referee Glen Jackson during the Highlanders-Stormers game (Getty)Passing giftsInterception tries are an occupational hazard – but rather more so at Exeter Chiefs.The pass by Ollie Devoto that JJ Hanrahan plucked out of the air for Northampton’s early try on Saturday was the latest in a long line of interception scores conceded by the Chiefs.Devoto had committed the same sin at Harlequins when Nick Evans latched on to his loose pass and the week before, Bristol’s Will Hurrell had capitalized on a gift from Henry Slade.Denny Solomona was the beneficiary when Stuart Townsend’s pass failed to find its mark against Sale while the Matt Jess pass that Leicester’s Tom Brady intercepted proved particularly costly because Chiefs ended up losing the Anglo-Welsh Cup final by just four points. Nick Evans gets the Stoop rocking as the goodbyes begin, the good and bad of Exeter Chiefs and why Bath DoR Todd Blackadder can afford to look smug last_img read more

Former Ireland No 8 Jamie Heaslip

first_img New role: Jamie Heaslip has moved into broadcasting since retiring (Getty Images) The ex-Leinster and Lions back-rower on start-ups, cigarette smoke and boa constrictors This article originally appeared in the April 2020 edition of Rugby World magazine. Follow Rugby World on Facebook, Instagram and Twitter. Downtime with… Former Ireland No 8 Jamie Heaslip How are you finding doing commentary with the BBC? I’ve enjoyed it. I much prefer it to ‘punditry’ – you say what you see. With punditry you need a beginning, middle and an end, and you have to have an opinion. It has challenged meto remain a student of the game. In real time you have to say what’s going on, so that it’s interesting and gives insight.So I’ve recently sat down with Stuart Lancaster – I met him two weeks ago for dinner – and talked with Joe Schmidt.What’s the worst job you’ve ever had? One of my first jobs was collecting glasses at a local nightclub when I was 15. It was before the smoking ban came in, so you would come home stinking of cigarettes. I’m laughing about it now because we’ve got a couple of pubs, so it’s kind of come full circle.What’s the funniest thing you’ve seen on a pitch? Probably listening to Nigel Owens with one of his one-liners. Sometimes rugby players take themselves too seriously.Quip thinking: Referee Nigel Owens shares a joke with Kieran Read (Getty Images)How about funniest team-mate? Paul O’Donohue or Fergus McFadden. They are like a jack-in-the-box. They’re both from Leinster but on an international level it would be Andy Powell.There’s very few clean pranks I can tell you about. What’s that old saying? What goes on tour stays on tour.Do you have any phobias? For the life of me I can’t understand why anyone would put a boa constrictor around their neck. It’s designed to strangle you! Why do it?Any guilty pleasures? Love Island is a guilty pleasure, though I’ve not been into it this season. And I suppose I’m more into my daughter’s cartoons than I thought I would be. At the moment it’s PAW Patrol. Who would you like to be stuck in a lift with and why?I’d like to be with someone like that guy from The Office, David Brent. That’d be time well spent.Any hidden talents? Not really but I’d say I’m a good person with dogs. What winds you up? People not being loyal. And people saying things on social media they’d never say to your face.Who would be your dream dinner party guests? I’d have the Scottish comedian Billy Connolly. He’s someone I’ve loved my entire life. It could be a rugby player, but I’d say Connolly, Muhammad Ali and I’d like to talk to Nikola Tesla (inventor/electrical engineer).Which team-mate would you like to be and why? I don’t think I’d be any other forward because the further forward you go, the larger they get. But with the backs, the further back you get, the vainer they are too!So I’ve not played with him but Sergio Parisse is pretty cool. He speaks Italian, French, English and I think Spanish. He’s a pretty good-looking fella, he’s still playing despite being my age and he’s just a slick f*****!What’s the silliest purchase you’ve made? Plenty of things! In my twenties I got all these gadgets I shouldn’t have. I was really into T3 magazine for years.If you could have one superpower, what would it be? I would be Wolverine. It’s the not aging and also the healing. His whole thing is that he’s continually rejuvenating – it’s why he could have the adamantium skeleton. Not being able to go through a metal detector is first-world problems. And they (the X-Men) had a private jet anyway.What about work away from rugby? I have invested in a couple of firms, one of which was sold to Google. I actually worked for Google for 13 months. Right now I spend most of my time working with (FinTech company) Flender – but it depends on the day of the week.So have you always been into tech? I am very into it. I’ve invested in a few, like Kitman Labs. I like companies that come in and ask “why?” when things can be done differently. What can we do better? I like working with disruptors.I was one of the first on social media, because I like breaking the chain of traditional media and going straight to the consumer. I’ve been on it for a long time. I remember being criticised for that and now everyone is on it.So what kind of investor are you? I’m definitely more of an angel investor. I don’t follow the money in. I prefer to have a small slice of a big pie than a big slice of a small pie. LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALSlast_img read more

Black Ferns centre Carla Hohepa

first_imgFind out how the New Zealander balances her rugby career with parenting Black Ferns centre Carla HohepaCarla Hohepa’s lockdown routine included a morning run with her partner, Karne Hesketh. As you’d expect from two professional athletes, that daily run could get competitive but while Hohepa concedes that Hesketh, the former Japan wing, is the faster of the couple, she says: “I don’t make it easy for him, that’s for sure!”It’s just one example of the Black Fern’s resolute nature. After all, she has returned to play international rugby after having a child not once but twice.Hohepa grew up with rugby, both her parents representing Waikato, and was a regular in the family’s touch team, but netball was her sport until she went to the University of Otago.Her flat-mate’s rugby team, Alhambra Union, were short of players one day in 2006 and she was asked to fill in. Soon she was playing provincial rugby, within 12 months she was making her New Zealand debut and come 2010 the wing was scoring the Black Ferns’ only try in the World Cup final as they beat England.The speed she shows on the pitch was replicated in her rugby comeback after having her first son, Cohen, now eight. Having a family as an elite sportswoman takes planning and the couple had decided post-RWC 2010 would be a good time to start. Hohepa was back in training weeks after giving birth, with the Rio Olympics the next goal.“It definitely wasn’t easy and it came with challenges, but I still wanted to play rugby again,” she says. “It was probably a lot of self-motivation to get back.“I was told to take it slow, but listening and wanting are two different things! After my first child, I was back running after five or six weeks and had my first sevens camp after two months.“If I was going for a run I’d put him in the pram and run the roads. If I had to do shuttles, I’d take him to the rugby field and put him on the sidelines. If I had to stop, I’d stop; it’s just a case of making it work.”A wrist injury prevented Hohepa from going to Rio 2016, but she was part of another 15s World Cup win the following year. Then came son number two, Kojiro, who is now two. This time Hohepa took things slower, four or five months passing before she started running.Fast show: Carla Hohepa is currently playing for Waikato in the Farah Palmer Cup (Getty Images)Test rugby wasn’t on the agenda and she was content playing at club level until the Black Ferns management called her up. She ended up starting all six Tests of 2019 at outside-centre. “The wingers coming through these days are half my age and very speedy, so it felt like this was the best time to move into the centres. I’ve always wanted to.” Kojiro travelled with her to the Super Series in San Diego last summer, too, with NZ Rugby’s contracts offering support for mothers in the international squads. It will be interesting to see if other nations follow the union’s lead.“I love international competition and the team environment. Last season my involvement with the Black Ferns was making sure what was available being a new mum.“To get to take him and a carer on tour with me as part of the NZ Rugby system was amazing. I felt very blessed and lucky to be part of that environment and the team were really supportive of me bringing him on tour. He had 35 new aunties and uncles, if you include the management team too.“It’s a huge step forward for women’s sport for NZ Rugby to put this in place. It helps female athletes know their career is not over if they have a baby. I don’t know if I’m a role model but I hope it shows it is possible to be a mum and a professional athlete at the same time.”Hohepa is part of this year’s contracted Black Ferns squad and admits the family diary takes a lot of organisation. Not only are there all the rugby and kids’ activities but the juggling of life between Japan, where Hesketh plays, and New Zealand.The next big date on the Black Ferns’ calendar is the 2021 World Cup. Now that there are just six weeks between the Olympics and the World Cup, we’re unlikely to see as much sevens and 15s crossover as we did in 2017, but New Zealand will still be favourites for the title and Hohepa hopes to be part of it.“I’d absolutely love to play in a home World Cup. I’ll have to wait and see what our crazy lifestyle throws at us!”Hohepa will be 36 when RWC 2021 kicks off but you wouldn’t bet against her given her tenacity. LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALScenter_img Best foot forward: Carla Hohepa breaks against Australia last year (Getty Images) This article originally appeared in the June 2020 edition of Rugby World magazine.Follow Rugby World on Facebook, Instagram and Twitter.last_img read more

Rugby World magazine’s Autumn Nations Cup special

first_img Rugby World magazine’s Autumn Nations Cup specialThe new edition of Rugby World magazine has all you need to know about the new Autumn Nations Cup tournament, which kicks off on 13 November.We give you the lowdown on all eight teams taking part, with exclusive interviews and insight from each camp, plus we take a look at what’s going on in the southern hemisphere.If you can’t get to the shops to buy a copy, you can now order single issues online and get the magazine delivered direct to your door – click here and select Rugby World’s Dec-20 issue.Or you can find out how to download the digital edition to your tablet here. We also have incredible subscription offers, including savings of up to 30% – it’s the perfect Christmas gift.Here are 15 reasons to buy Rugby World magazine’s December 2020 edition…1. Ben Earl exclusive interviewThe England back-row, who is on loan at Bristol from Saracens, talks to RW’s Alan Pearey about his progress in the game and his goals. Coaches Alex Sanderson and Rory Teague also provide insight into Earl’s rise2. Glen Jackson on going from refereeing to coachingThe former Saracens fly-half and elite official explains why he’s made the switch to coaching and how he’s aiming to help Fiji improve their discipline3. Italy lock Niccolo CannoneThe Benetton second-row is part of Italy’s new generation and is hungry for successEmpty feeling: There was no crowd to see England Women seal a Grand Slam in Italy (Getty Images)4. A tribute to fans “Rugby without fans is a film without dialogue.” Rugby World columnist Stephen Jones on the lifeblood of the game5. France’s Gael FickouFrom teen sensation to Test regular, the France centre/wing has found his groove. He talks about life under Fabien Galthie, moving from Toulouse to Stade Francais and his childhood heroes6. All Black Aaron Smith“He is as close to the perfect passer of a ball as the sport has seen.” Read Stuart Barnes on why New Zealand scrum-half Aaron Smith is the best in the worldBall player: Scotland’s Jamie Ritchie in action against Wales (Getty Images)7. Scotland flanker Jamie Ritchie LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS Whether making telling tackles on the pitch or growing a hand-gel business off it, the Edinburgh back-row relishes keeping busy, as he tells Tom English8. The Wallabies conundrumTime after time we have heard clichés about Australia forwards. To flourish, the Wallabies pack must find the sweet spot between grit, flair and modern pragmatism. It’s all about balance, says RW’s Alan Dymock9. My day off… Joe MarlerThe Harlequins and England prop has enjoyed talking himself in a new direction by launching a podcast. We find out moreAll smiles: James Lowe takes part in Ireland training (Inpho)10. The making of James LoweThe Leinster winger is in line to make his Ireland debut this month, so we’ve spoken to coaches and team-mates past and present to find out about his route to Test rugby11. Georgia captain Merab Sharikadze“We’ve been waiting for this opportunity for a long time.” The Lelos centre explains his excitement about the Autumn Nations Cup12. Downtime with… Ben YoungsEngland’s latest centurion talks close mates and fake snakes in this offbeat Q&APlayer to coach: Stephen Jones is now an assistant coach with Wales (Getty Images)13. Stephen Jones’s life in picturesThe former Wales fly-half, who is now part of the national coaching team, reflects on the highs and lows from his career on and off the field. Sean Holley also analyses how Wales are looking to play under Jones and head coach Wayne Pivac14. Springbok Duane VermeulenAfter months of waiting, rugby is back in South Africa, albeit that they won’t play in the Rugby Championship. The No 8 looks at what lies ahead15. Paul Grayson columnThe former England fly-half previews the Autumn Nations Cup and explains why he thinks coaches should use it as a chance to introduce new players TAGS: Highlight center_img Plus, there’s all this…Inside the mind of… Jake BallA debate on rugby’s disciplinary processLisa Thomson on Scotland’s RWC 2021 qualifiersTips on how to bindRising stars Alfie Barbeary and Ioan LloydPreview of England v France WomenClub Hero Phil DollmanThe Secret Player on the SpringboksScotland scrum-half Ali PriceNutrition advice for rehabSouth Africa sevens star JC PretoriusGrass-roots club newsThe December 2020 issue of Rugby World magazine is on sale from 3 to 30 November 2020.Follow Rugby World on Facebook, Instagram and Twitter. The December 2020 issue gives you the lowdown on all eight teamslast_img read more

WEST TEXAS: Fighting wildfires

first_img Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Rector Martinsville, VA Nature Conservancy firefighters watch as smoke billows from wildfire in basin below. Photo courtesy of Dan Snodgrass[Diocese of West Texas] It began when a clap of dry lightning exploded on the parched “sky island” high in the Davis Mountains of West Texas. With no rain to douse the sparks, the wind-fanned smoldering embers quickly grew into a runaway wildfire, feeding on the tinderbox of dried grasses, piñon pines and juniper.Volunteer firefighters from the Fort Davis area battled the blaze before calling for reinforcements from the Texas Forest Service. Among the hundreds of responders were two from St. Michael and All Angels Episcopal Church in Blanco , a vibrant mission in the heart of the Texas Hill Country.Neither knew the other was there, much less that they were both wildland firefighters.As associate director of land conservation for The Nature Conservancy, Dan Snodgrass oversees all 37 Nature Conservancy properties in Texas. When that bolt of lightning struck on April 24, 2012, he took a special interest in it. The fire was on the Davis Mountains Preserve — one of his preserves.The Davis Mountains Preserve is among the most unique and majestic areas of Texas. With elevations from 5,000 feet to the 8,378-foot summit of Mount Livermore, the preserve is an isolated “sky island” of diverse plant and animal life surrounded by the expansive Chihuahuan Desert.Since 1997, The Nature Conservancy has managed to cobble together a 32,000 acre tract carved out of the U Up U Down Ranch and other properties. Another 70,000 acres are protected in conservation easements adjacent to the preserve.Snodgrass, like many Nature Conservancy employees, has undergone the same rigorous wildland fire fighting training and certification that professional firefighters undertake. “We slip right in with them,” he said.So when he received word that the fire was burning his preserve, he grabbed his Nomax protective clothing, hardhat and headed to the fire from his home in Johnson City, Texas.As Snodgrass rushed to the fire, a call went out to Hunter Wistrand, a retired U.S. Forest Service ranger and firefighter now in his second year as bishop’s warden at St. Michael. The Texas Forest Service calls Wistrand when a fire gets big enough to require extensive mobilization.A wildland fire fighting operation is akin to a military campaign, complete with strict rules of engagement and a top to bottom command structure. At the top of the Davis Mountains command structure was Paul Hanneman, who himself has a link to St. Michael. His mother-in-law is Janet Smith, a long-time member of St. Michael.Wistrand was assigned the job of operations section chief, which gave him the responsibility of making day-to-day fire fighting assignments. Based on his recommendations, the fire fighting resources were doubled.Aircraft ranging from large tankers to single-engine planes and helicopters were brought in to drop water and retardants on the fire. Hot shots – those 20-person crews that cut fire lines by hand – arrived from as far away as Virginia and started scratching out a six-mile fire break to keep the blaze from spreading. A professional caterer was even called in to feed hundreds of empty stomachs.Dan Snodgrass, left, and Hunter Wistrand, right. Photo courtesy of Dan SnodgrassOn this fire, Snodgrass and other Nature Conservancy employees supported the operation by providing water, housing and strategic advice about how to fight the fire on preserve property.The biggest threat was to the isolated Davis Mountains Resort, an eclectic subdivision of 250 permanent residents and 400 absentee landowners adjacent to the Nature Conservancy and downwind from the fire.One morning, as Snodgrass reviewed the action plan for that day’s fire fighting, he noticed Wistrand’s name. “I saw his name there and thought, ‘I know that name,’ but couldn’t place it. Then at the morning briefing I saw Hunter,” Snodgrass said.“I looked out in the crowd and saw Dan,” Wistrand said. “I shook his hand and asked him what he was doing there.”Snodgrass asked Wistrand what he was doing there.“He didn’t know I worked for the Texas Forest Service and I didn’t know he worked for The Nature Conservancy,” Wistrand said.“Wildland fire fighting is a small world,” Snodgrass said. “Here you are out in the middle of nowhere and you have three people – me, Hunter and Paul Hanneman – all associated with one little Episcopal church.”When the Livermore Ranch Complex fire was finally out, it left 13,665 acres burned in and around the Davis Mountains Preserve and another 10,576 acres charred around nearby Spring Mountain. No structure was lost or damaged at the Davis Mountains Resort.Although fire is “mostly a good thing” for the environment, Snodgrass said the preserve “lost quite a few ponderosa pines we’d rather not have lost.” But the land’s generational recovery will present huge opportunities for researchers to study its rebound, he said.The son of lifelong Episcopalians, Snodgrass grew up in Brownfield, Texas, attended Texas Tech University, majored in wildlife management and has been at the Conservancy for some 15 years. Johnson City doesn’t have an Episcopal Church, so he, his wife Aylin, two children, mother and brother drive 15 miles south to church in Blanco’s St. Michael.Wistrand, also a lifelong Episcopalian, grew up in Colorado City in the rolling grass and scrub brush of West Texas where there wasn’t a forest and barely a tree in sight.How did he end up fighting forest fires?“When I was in ninth grade, they gave us an aptitude test. Mine showed that I had an aptitude for either a forester, game warden or dentist,” he said. “I knew I didn’t want to spend my career looking down somebody’s throat. So I went into forestry.”After graduating from Stephen F. Austin State University in the Piney Woods of East Texas, he went to work for the U.S. Forest Service. His first assignment was spraying Southern pine beetles with insecticide. “I’d come home drenched in insecticide,” he said. “I’m lucky I don’t have cancer.”His next job was hauling trash and cleaning restrooms. “That was a step up from spraying pine beetles,” he said.The year he got out of college, he went on his first fire in the Santa Fe National Forest, doing the grueling work of cutting fire lines by hand. “When you’re 22, you don’t even think about how hard it is,” he said.As he advanced in his career, he had a variety of forest service assignments that took him from Texas to Florida to New Mexico before ending up in Flagstaff, Arizona, where his entire job was centered on fire fighting.After a 29-year career, he retired in 2001 and moved with his wife Virginia to Spring Branch south of Blanco to be near family. His daughter Laura has taught Sunday school at St. Michael for two years and Virginia serves on the altar guild and as an acolyte. The Wistrands bring a passel of grandkids to church with them.In addition to responding to calls from the Texas Forest Service, Wistrand teaches fire training courses across the nation. He finds life as a semi-retired fire fighter enjoyable.“There’s no conference calls, no budget meetings, no staff meetings. No meetings of any kind,” he said with a smile.Despite the rigorous work, fighting fires “is a lot of fun actually,” Snodgrass said. “Most everybody who does it enjoys it. It’s hard work. It’s exciting. It’s a real sense of accomplishment. It’s a finished product, if you will.”Although devote Episcopalians, neither has much time to think about spiritual matters while on a fire. “There’s no opportunity for church or prayer,” Snodgrass said. “Usually it’s a two-week detail, all day, every day. It’s all about fire.”In the quietness of an evening, though, Wistrand does take a moment or two to ponder the immensity of nature around him. “I make the connection with God by sitting on a mountain,” he said. “This may sound odd, but sitting on a peak at night time there is nothing prettier than watching the sparkle of a wildfire burning on a hillside with the stars above.”“Fire is a natural force like tornadoes, hurricanes and volcanos,” he said. “I don’t think the good Lord put these forces here to harm us. I look at fire as a beneficial thing, not a destructive force.”When he looks at the power of a fire burning through the lands, “that kind of scenery really puts things in perspective about how little influence we have as a single person and who’s really running things here.”In his reflections, Snodgrass thinks about environmental stewardship. “I love the outdoors. The church makes me think about that. It’s a way to fulfill both my personal and church missions,” he said.— Mike Patterson is a freelance writer and member of St. Michael and All Angels Episcopal Church in Blanco. He is a regular contributor to The Church News, a publication of the Diocese of West Texas. In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Virtual Episcopal Latino Ministry Competency Course Online Course Aug. 9-13 July 2, 2012 at 10:09 pm Good article……………be careful and we’ll be praying for you………………….. The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Rector Pittsburgh, PA Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector Tampa, FL Featured Jobs & Calls Youth Minister Lorton, VA By Mike PattersonPosted Jul 2, 2012 An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Rector Bath, NC AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Fr. Michael Neal says: Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Rector Washington, DC Rector Shreveport, LA Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Submit an Event Listing TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Submit a Press Release Comments (1) Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Rector Hopkinsville, KY center_img Comments are closed. Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Featured Events Director of Music Morristown, NJ Curate Diocese of Nebraska Rector Collierville, TN Associate Rector Columbus, GA WEST TEXAS: Fighting wildfires Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Rector Belleville, IL Submit a Job Listing Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Rector Knoxville, TN Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Press Release Service Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Rector Albany, NY An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 @ 7 p.m. ET Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Rector Smithfield, NClast_img read more

En la espera (y el tránsito) de Adviento

first_img An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Rector Smithfield, NC Associate Rector Columbus, GA Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Featured Jobs & Calls Rector Pittsburgh, PA Virtual Episcopal Latino Ministry Competency Course Online Course Aug. 9-13 AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH [Episcopal News Service] La única manera que Mark Roberts, un autotitulado “advientófilo”, se concentra en el motivo de la estación es con un árbol de Adviento.“Tengo un pequeño árbol artificial en mi oficina que adorno con luces moradas”, dijo Roberts, pastor presbiteriano, blogero y director de retiros en la Logia del Laicado [Laity Lodge] cerca de San Antonio, Texas.En una reunión devocional que él tiene una vez a la semana con su grupo “animo a las personas a reflexionar piadosamente sobre un aspecto de nuestra esperanza en este Adviento en particular”, dijo Roberts durante una entrevista con ENS el 11 de diciembre. “Aliento a cada uno a tomar uno de mis adornos morados y, mientras meditan en esa esperanza, ofrecérselo a Dios y ponerlo en el árbol como un signo de su oración.“Oro cada día y ofrezco esas esperanzas a Dios. Es una extraña combinación de cosas, pero para mí y para los que están en nuestra organización se ha convertido en una manera significativa de recordar las esperanzas que tenemos y ofrecérselas a Dios”.Del mismo modo, Linda Roberts, su esposa, ha salido con su propia resistencia creativa a la prisa hacia la Navidad [que impone] la cultura imperante: ella hace dibujos a mano alzada con letreros.Por ejemplo, el décimo día de Adviento, uno de estos bocetos muestra la semejanza de un puente rodeado de citas de la Escritura, preguntas y exclamaciones, así como de la afirmación en negrita: “No se preocupe, Dios ha oído su oración”.Los amantes del Adviento de toda clase están personalizando enfoques híbridos de la estación expectante. Están siendo, al mismo tiempo, jubilosos y graves, todos están de acuerdo en que experimentar visceralmente el anhelo, la vulnerabilidad, la necesidad de la esperanzas y el austero deseo de Dios prepara el camino para la transformación navideña.En un retiro reciente en la Diócesis de Los Ángeles, los líderes del retiro, Barbara Braver y el ex obispo primado Frank Griswold, caracterizaron la espera del Adviento como las piezas de un rompecabezas que, con suerte, completaremos para Navidad.“Las personas se afanan mucho por ser íntegras de tantas maneras, por tratar de hacer lo correcto. Nos prometemos a nosotros mismos que haremos esto, o aquello o lo otro y fracasamos. Con tanta frecuencia no dejamos cabida a la misericordia de Dios”, dijo Braver durante una entrevista telefónica el 11 de diciembre desde su casa en Gloucester, Massachusetts.Los retiros de Adviento, [así como] los días de recogimiento y los rituales propios [de la estación] son recordatorios útiles de que “uno sólo necesita a Dios ahora —ni en el futuro, ni en el pasado—; pero vivir en el presente resulta difícil para nosotros.“Especialmente porque en esta época del año estamos a la espera, muchos de nosotros, de las agotadoras realidades de la mañana de Navidad”, añadió Braver. “Los regalos perfectos, si tenemos dinero para adquirirlos, y la comida y la ropa que nos vamos a poner y tal vez que estamos muy delgados o muy gruesos e intentamos que el árbol se mantenga derecho y las agujas [del pino] tal vez ya han comenzado a caerse y aún es demasiado temprano.“O quizá estamos pensando en otras navidades, en quienes estuvieron y quienes faltan ahora y acaso en errores que cometimos en ocasiones pasadas. Hay muchas cosas asociadas en nuestra psique a la Navidad; mucho tiene que ver con lo que aún no es, de manera que esto ayuda a reservar algún tiempo y poner toda la intención en ello, y ser conscientes de la presencia de Dios, de que el reino de Dios es ahora”.Encontrarse con Dios en la oración, o en la poesía o la música o el pan y el vino, o en la Escritura y otros rituales son todos ellos medios que nos ayudan a devolvernos a la realidad del misterio de la presencia de Dios siempre con nosotros, dijo Griswold durante una reciente entrevista telefónica desde Filadelfia, Pensilvania.“Esperar en Adviento ¿consiste en descender a ese lugar más profundo, para pedir lo que más profundamente deseamos? Sí asocio el Adviento con lo que más profundamente deseo porque eso es probablemente lo que Dios quiere darme”, afirmó él.“Y no se trata de un auto o una camisa nuevos o del cuerpo perfecto o de cualesquiera de esas cosas que se nos ofrecen a diario como parte de nuestra cultura”, añadió. “Pero, ¿cuál es el deseo más profundo? ¿Alegría? ¿Felicidad? ¿Deseo un sentido de relación con el misterio de mi propia vida y de que Dios y Jesús sean parte de ella?Así como las lecciones bíblicas de Adviento describen las ansias de un pueblo sometido y derrotado por una nueva identidad y por una renovada vida pública basada en la justicia y la compasión, así los anhelos contemporáneos son “de esas profundas restauraciones del espíritu humano y de las realidades sociales que nos sostienen y nos definen”, dijo Griswold.El rompecabezas se arma mientras “esperamos en silencio, encontrándonos con nuestra propia pobreza y permitiendo que el espíritu se manifieste dentro de nosotros con gemidos demasiado profundos para expresarlos en oración y nos haga conscientes de algunas cosas que en nuestras ocupaciones no seríamos capaces de advertir o de ver”, agregó.Él crea ese espacio necesario mediante la incorporación de música meditativa [del monasterio] Taizé, en lugar de los himnos procesionales y finales de las mañanas del domingo. Los ujieres bajan simultáneamente las luces para acentuar el efecto, explicó.“En Adviento, en verdad hemos tratado, como congregación, de buscar un modo de juntarnos que sea muy distinto del mundo… de llevar el mensaje al hogar de que la atmósfera es de silenciosa expectativa y meditación”, dijo Yaw el 11 de diciembre durante una entrevista desde Southfield.Él también ofrece una alternativa estacional con la celebración de la fiesta de San Nicolás. Este domingo, 16 de diciembre, San Nicolás llegará como parte del oficio de lecciones y villancicos de Adviento de la congregación.“En lugar de ir a los centros comerciales o al club o a cualquier otro lugar donde uno encuentra a Santa Claus, San Nicolás saldrá este domingo, y el coro de niños será parte de las lecciones y los villancicos”, agregó.Después habrá una cena y fotos con San Nicolás en lugar de Santa, como una manera de hacer “de la iglesia un apacible lugar alternativo de la espera y la expectativa de Adviento que sí resuene con algunas de las cosas de la cultura [circundante]”.En Denver, Colorado, en la Casa para Todos los Santos y Pecadores (HFASS, por su sigla en inglés) el vicario Alex Raabe, y Nadia Bolz-Weber, la promotora de la misión, han creado un espacio alternativo con un “salón de espera de Adviento” al aire libre.Ellos colgaron luces de Navidad azules en el patio de la Iglesia Episcopal de Santo Tomás [St. Thomas Episcopal Church], donde la HFASS, una nueva congregación de la Iglesia Evangélica Luterana en América, se reúne a las 5:00 P.M. los domingos.“Decidimos que Adviento se trata de esperar, así que, cuando todo el mundo se reúne, en lugar de sentarse en sillas o de ir a las barras del café, pensamos, por qué no esperamos afuera como una manera realista de recordar que estamos a la espera, no sólo de la venida de Cristo, estamos a la espera de muchas otras cosas, comunidad, solidaridad, calidez. Este salón de espera cumple con ese fin”, dijo Raabe el 12 de diciembre durante el curso de una entrevista desde Denver.“Es realmente una manera hermosa de relacionarnos los unos con los otros de una forma que no se produce cuando uno está adentro, en un ambiente tibio y confortable, y puede compartir con sus amigos…  en lo que a veces puede ser un clima terriblemente frío. Pero eso hace que el calor del edificio despierte mucho más entusiasmo y sea mucho mejor y más adventual”.Los calentadores de propano, el chocolate caliente y la sidra ayudan a alejar el frío, añadió. Adicionalmente, después del sermón, una proyección de diapositivas muestra la respuesta de la congregación a los temas de Adviento de esperanza, paz, alegría y amor.“La gente ha estado buscando entre sus fotos y hemos tenido muchísimas imágenes de mujeres embarazadas” y de un niño de la congregación que no se esperaba que viviera, pero que ya tiene 2 años, puntualizó Raabe.“Eso nos ayuda a captar lo que hemos estado oyendo todo el tiempo, pero de una manera diferente”, añadió. Es otra forma, distinta y novedosa, que la gente tiene de relacionarse y de oír la palabra de Dios”.–La Rda. Pat McCaughan es corresponsal de Episcopal News Service y está radicada en Los Ángeles.Traducido por Vicente Echerri Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Rector Knoxville, TN Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Rector Belleville, IL En la espera (y el tránsito) de Adviento Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Submit a Job Listing This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Rector Hopkinsville, KY Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Por Pat McCaughanPosted Dec 17, 2012 Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA center_img Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Director of Music Morristown, NJ Rector Albany, NY Rector Bath, NC Rector Tampa, FL Press Release Service Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Rector Martinsville, VA Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Rector Shreveport, LA Youth Minister Lorton, VA Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Submit a Press Release Rector Washington, DC Submit an Event Listing Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Featured Events Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Rector Collierville, TN Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Curate Diocese of Nebraska Course Director Jerusalem, Israel An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 @ 7 p.m. ET last_img read more

England’s bishops urge parishes to help ‘Keep the Promise’

first_img Rector Martinsville, VA Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Rector Bath, NC Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Posted Jan 25, 2013 Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Director of Music Morristown, NJ An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 @ 7 p.m. ET An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Anglican Communion Youth Minister Lorton, VA Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Tags Featured Events Rector Collierville, TN Featured Jobs & Calls AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis England’s bishops urge parishes to help ‘Keep the Promise’ Rector Knoxville, TN Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Rector Washington, DC Associate Rector Columbus, GA Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Submit a Job Listing Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Rector Tampa, FL center_img Rector Pittsburgh, PA Submit an Event Listing The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Rector Shreveport, LA Curate Diocese of Nebraska Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Rector Smithfield, NC Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Virtual Episcopal Latino Ministry Competency Course Online Course Aug. 9-13 Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Press Release Service Rector Hopkinsville, KY Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Submit a Press Release [Church of England] Four Church of England Bishops have called on parishes to respond to public consultations being run by uniformed organisations about the ‘promises’ their new members make.In an open letter, published in the Church Times today (24th January 2013), the Bishops of Jarrow, Southwell and Nottingham, Grantham and Truro encourage all to engage in the public dialogues being run independently by the Scout Association and Girlguiding UK.The Scouts consultation, which closes on January 31st, asks some significant questions about how Scouting might look in the future as a value-based organisation. Specifically, it asks whether an alternative version of the Scout Promise should be developed for “atheists and those unable to make the existing commitment”.Girlguiding UK’s consultation, which runs until March 3rd, questions the relevance of promises to serve God and the Queen, to modern members. On its website the organisation states, “We know it’s crucial that girls and young women understand and believe in the words they say.”In their letter, the Bishops recognise the “deep links” many parishes have with the uniformed organisations and pay tribute to “all that Scouting and Guiding do as value-based organisations for many thousands of young people throughout our country.”However, they “urge guides, scouts, their leaders and parents to respond to this important consultation to demonstrate the support, collaboration and goodwill of the Church communities in our partnership with the Scouting and Guiding movements.”A briefing paper entitled “Keeping the Promise” is available on the Church of England website.Notes to editors1. Keeping the Promise briefing paper is available athttp://www.churchofengland.org/mediacentre/news/2013/01/keeping-the-promise.aspx2. The full text of the Bishops letter:Dear Sir,We write to encourage those in Churches to take the opportunity to respond to the public consultations being undertaken independently by the Scouting movement and Girl Guiding Movement within the UK.The Church has deep links with uniformed organisations. Many have come to faith through scouting and many to scouting through faith and the link with churches. There is much for which to be grateful in all that Scouting and Guiding do as value-based organisations for many thousands of young people throughout our country. The commitment of many of the leaders is an example to many of usThe consultation from the Scouting movement – which closes on January 31st – asks some significant questions about how Scouting might look in the future as a value-based organisation. The public consultation from the Guiding movement closes on March 3rdA briefing paper entitled “Keeping the Promise” is available on the Church of England website and provides further helpful detail on the consultations.We urge guides, scouts, their leaders and parents to respond to this important consultation to demonstrate the support, collaboration and goodwill of the Church communities in our partnership with the Scouting and Guiding movements.Yours faithfully,Mark Bryant + JarrowPaul Butler + Southwell & NottsTim Ellis   + GranthamTim Thornton + Truro3. The URLs of the two consultations are:The Scout Associationhttp://members.scouts.org.uk/fundamentals/?pageid=2944Girlguiding UKhttp://www.girlguiding.org.uk/news/promise_consultation_now_open.aspx Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Rector Belleville, IL Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Rector Albany, NY Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI last_img read more

All Saints, Tarpon Springs names Wayne Farrell as fourth rector

first_img Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Submit a Press Release AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Associate Rector Columbus, GA Rector Martinsville, VA Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs Curate Diocese of Nebraska Rector Tampa, FL Rector Smithfield, NC Featured Events Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Rector Bath, NC Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Director of Music Morristown, NJ Rector Washington, DC Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Tags Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Course Director Jerusalem, Israel An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 @ 7 p.m. ET Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Submit an Event Listing The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Posted Jun 19, 2013 Virtual Episcopal Latino Ministry Competency Course Online Course Aug. 9-13 center_img Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ [Diocese of Southwest Florida] The Rev. Wayne F. Farrell, 54, this week was elected rector of All Saints’ Episcopal Church, Tarpon Springs. The parish, organized in 1892, is one of the oldest churches in the Diocese of Southwest Florida and the Tampa Bay region.“I am pleased and honored to be called as rector of All Saints’ Episcopal Church in Tarpon Springs,” said Farrell, a lifelong Episcopalian and native of Sarasota.Farrell, whose position was approved this week by Bishop Dabney T. Smith, will be formally installed this fall as only the fourth rector for the church, which is notable for still worshipping in its original Florida carpenter gothic church building. Throughout its history, All Saints’ has been closely linked to the history and economic development of Tarpon Springs; one of the founding members of the parish was responsible for bringing the sponging industry to Tarpon Springs and also founded the Tarpon Springs Sponge Exchange.Called to All Saints’ Church in September of 2011, Farrell has served as Priest-in-Charge for the past 21 months under the direction of the Diocese. Farrell is a 1980 graduate of the University of Florida. He and his wife Trish have been married for 29 years and have two adult children. After working 27 years as a small businessman in the field of real estate development and home building, he was called to the ordained ministry. In 2011, Farrell graduated with a Masters of Divinity from the School of Theology of the University of the South in Sewanee, Tennessee.All Saints’, located near the north end of Lake Tarpon, was organized in 1892 during the tenure of missionary Bishop William Crane Gray, who opened some of the earliest settler churches in Florida. The first sermon was preached in the current church building in 1906 and it was consecrated in 1907. All Saints’ has been an important church in the Episcopal Diocese; the late Bishop Henry I. Louttit was vicar of the church while it was a mission.In June 1979, the church building moved from downtown Tarpon Springs to its current location at 1700 Keystone Road. Today, the church continues to be an important part of the Tarpon Springs community. All Saints’ is a founding member of the Shepherd Center coalition for the needy and also hosts the independent Christian academy Solid Rock Community School on their campus.“Our parish is grateful to Bishop Smith and his staff for their support during our transition,” said Farrell. “Most importantly, this congregation is thankful at being strengthened by the Holy Spirit over the past 21 months. We look forward to the new places God is leading us in mission and ministry.” Rector Belleville, IL Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Rector Albany, NY Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Youth Minister Lorton, VA Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Rector Collierville, TN This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Rector Pittsburgh, PA Rector Knoxville, TN People The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Rector Shreveport, LA All Saints, Tarpon Springs names Wayne Farrell as fourth rector Press Release Service Rector Hopkinsville, KY Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Submit a Job Listing Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Featured Jobs & Callslast_img read more

Sandy reflections: ‘Accompany those at risk of falling through cracks’

first_img Rector Pittsburgh, PA This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Hurricane Sandy Featured Events Featured Jobs & Calls Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs A statue of Jesus appears to be keeping watch over donated food in the boiler room of St. Mary’s by-the-Sea Episcopal Church in Point Pleasant Beach, New Jersey, in an example0f what Katie Mears calls the “amazing work” that parishes performed for their communities after Hurricane Sandy. Photo: Mary Frances Schjonberg, Episcopal News ServiceEditors’ note: A year ago today, Oct. 29, 2012, Hurricane Sandy set to reeling a large part of the East Coast of the United States. At least 147 people died in the Atlantic basin because of the storm; of that number 72 were killed in the mid-Atlantic and northeastern United States. Sandy caused an estimated $65.7 billion in damage, including destroying or damaging 650,000 homes and damaging hundreds of thousands of businesses. Episcopal News Service invited seven people to reflect on their experience of Sandy, what lessons they and their faith communities learned and what challenges they still face. All seven reflections are available here.[Episcopal News Service] I’ll admit that Hurricane Sandy caught me off guard. In my role as director of the U.S. Disaster program at Episcopal Relief & Development, I try to be constantly vigilant; I normally begin each morning during storm season by opening the National Hurricane Center’s website and checking what’s going on, even before I dig into my email. But by late October of last year, I assumed the season was over. We’d had a perfectly-behaved streak of storms that all neatly hooked out to the north Atlantic, and I thought we were in the clear. I sat down at my desk that week and instead of checking the weather, immediately jumped to email and calendar and the busyness of the day. Then someone popped into my office to ask if I was tracking this storm headed to New York. Not yet…In fall 2011, in the aftermath of Hurricane Irene and the earthquake outside the District of Columbia, we’d realized that as a New York-based organization, we had some preparedness work to do. We’d talked as a staff about what we’d do if something happened here, who’d we communicate with if we were at home, where we’d meet up if we were in the office, what the back-up plan would be if communications systems were down. We did a “drill” that fall, and hoped for the best, planning to revisit the plan and the drills as an entire staff each September (as we recommend for parishes and dioceses).Katie Mears is director of the U.S. Disaster Preparedness and Response program at Episcopal Relief & Development.I expected New York’s infrastructure to hold, even when tested by the complexity of this storm. Like many others, I was wrong. I didn’t fully understand what a disaster would look like when it hit a large complicated urban area; let alone a vast, diverse region, stretching from the Chesapeake Bay to the Connecticut coast.My apartment on high ground in Brooklyn was spared by the storm. Our only perils were a few moments without internet and reduced hours at the grocery store downstairs. But then my phone started ringing, with reports from neighboring dioceses.At Episcopal Relief & Development, I work with dioceses to create programs to support their vulnerable neighbors after disasters. We provide them with advice from others who’ve run post-disaster ministries in the past and financial resources to scale up their food pantries, meal programs, and other responses. After Sandy, that meant working with diocesan disaster coordinators from the Diocese of Easton on Maryland’s Eastern Shore up to Connecticut, as well as some inland dioceses where we feared that the storm’s rain could trigger flooding.The needs in those first few weeks were vast. Power was out in buildings all over New York, leaving elderly and disabled people stranded—and cold—in their apartments. Electric pumps are needed to get water to apartments over 6 stories so many of these residents lacked plumbing as well. The subway system was shut down for days. I biked to work over the Manhattan Bridge with thousands of other Brooklynites, through 50 blocks of darkened lower Manhattan. As I rode through Chinatown, I saw elderly people lined up at open fire hydrants filling small beach buckets to carry home. I quickly heard from church staff in New Jersey and Easton and New York and Long Island and from the rest of the region. Each had stories of parishes doing amazing work to support their neighbors, often while dealing with significant property concerns at the same time.We support these ministries in the early, chaotic first few weeks after a disaster. But our work is even more important as the disaster drags on and loses its position in the national consciousness. It’s in this long-term recovery phase that folks are working to create sustainable futures for themselves with housing, employment, etc. It’s where the Church can play a critical role, both physically—rebuilding homes, offering case management, hosting volunteers—but also spiritually by providing a place where the community can mourn the losses and celebrate the successes. The Church plays a critical role in maintaining focus on improving the lives of the most vulnerable survivors, accompanying those most at risk of falling through the cracks through their recovery process. We’re partnering with the Dioceses of Easton, New Jersey, Newark, and New York to create programs to help their most vulnerable neighbors recover.Sandy reminded me, once again, the power of our church to respond. We often tell the story about our church as one of deficits—aging population, shrinking budgets, etc.—but we’re so gifted. We have churches in so many communities, they are in relationship with their vulnerable neighbors and they have the heart to do this work. A few simple systems can make those processes much smoother, and my team works to make that happen, but the orientation is already in place.For information about preparedness planning in your own diocese, check our list of Diocesan Disaster Coordinators. If your diocese isn’t on the list, talk to your bishop— Katie Mears is director of the U.S. Disaster Preparedness and Response program at Episcopal Relief & Development. 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