New Director of Operations appointed at Click Collection

first_img Tagged with: Click Collection Donated goods Trading Howard Lake | 2 December 2013 | News About Howard Lake Howard Lake is a digital fundraising entrepreneur. Publisher of UK Fundraising, the world’s first web resource for professional fundraisers, since 1994. Trainer and consultant in digital fundraising. Founder of Fundraising Camp and co-founder of GoodJobs.org.uk. Researching massive growth in giving. Multicharity clothes recycling scheme Click Collection has appointed Richard Huckett as Director of Operations.He joins from charity-focused IT recycling business Millrace IT where he was Social Enterprise Director. His experience of the broader third sector and of Ebay for Charity trading will help in expanding Click Collection.David Alder, MD of Click Collection, said: ”As Director of Operations Richard will be a great asset in our growth plans. Now that we are focussed on selling through Ebay for Charity his experience will be invaluable. Our unique trading model enables any charity with a public supporter base to benefit from retail sales without needing a High Street shop. Richard will help in introducing more charities to this huge fundraising opportunity”. AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to EmailEmailShare to WhatsAppWhatsAppShare to MessengerMessengerShare to MoreAddThis  28 total views,  1 views today AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to EmailEmailShare to WhatsAppWhatsAppShare to MessengerMessengerShare to MoreAddThis New Director of Operations appointed at Click Collectionlast_img read more

Woman Arrested Following Traffic Stop, Charged With DWI Under Leandra’s Law

first_imgStock Image.JAMESTOWN – A City of Jamestown woman was arrested and charged for allegedly driving while under the influence of drugs following a traffic stop on Tuesday.Jamestown Police say Stephanie Dellahoy, 31, was pulled over in the area of E. 2nd and E. 5th Streets for an alleged traffic infraction just after 8 p.m.Officers allege that Dellahoy was found in possession of a quantity of methamphetamine and hydrocodone pills.Additionally, police said Dellahoy’s 4-year-old daughter and another 5-year-old child was in the vehicle at the time of the traffic stop. Dellahoy was taken into custody and charged with two counts of endangering the welfare of a child, two counts of felony aggravated DWI Leandra’s Law, DWAI, two counts of seventh-degree criminal possession of a controlled substance and on other traffic infractions.Police did not report if the children remained in Dellahoy’s care. Share:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to email this to a friend (Opens in new window),Those Dellahoy’s are fuck uplast_img read more

How Could Polar Dinosaurs Survive Freezing, Darkness?

first_imgNational Geographic News has a report about a new exhibit of dinosaur fossils that have been found in the northern and southern polar regions.  These unusual creatures had to survive not only the cold, but also, due to the effects of orbital mechanics, six months of darkness each year.  Intrepid explorers in south Australia, northern Canada, Patagonia, Alaska and Antarctica have braved the elements since the 1980s to find dinosaur bones in the extreme polar regions.  Their discoveries have changed our conceptions of dinosaur metabolism and the ecosystems in which they lived.  Polar dinosaurs include:Hypsolophodontids: “small, speedy, plant-eating dinosaurs that ran on two feet.”  They had large eyes, apparently adapted to low light levels, and bones that grew throughout the year, suggesting they were warm blooded.  The plants on which they fed apparently did not drop their leaves during the winter.A horned dinosaur named Serendipaceratops arthurcclarkei (no kidding) must have looked like something out of a sci-fi movie.  NG claims this is “one of the oldest horned, or frilled, dinosaurs known, which suggests that horned dinosaurs may have originated in the southern polar region.”A sauropod, possibly the largest found in Antarctica, is being analyzed.  It was found at 13,000 feet elevation.An allosaurus-like meat eater named Cryolophosaurus ellioti was 22 feet long.The exhibit at Seattle’s Burke Museum is called “Dinosaur of Darkness.”Throughout the world there are mysteries.  Fossils give silent evidence of a very different world in the past; a world with polar regions that must have supported lush plant life and rich ecologies of diverse plants and animals larger than those living today.  Large redwood stumps have also been found in the Arctic circle (see 03/22/2002 headline), and there are the legendary frozen mammoths of Siberia.    This article suggests that “the climate was warmer then than it is now,” but puzzles over the fact that these dinosaurs must have “endured months of darkness and temperatures that plunged below freezing.”  For plants to have supported herbivores and carnivores of this size near the poles, it would seem there must have been atmospheric conditions that evened out the lighting and temperature.    As for horned dinosaurs originating near the south pole, we laugh, ha ha, at this funny joke.(Visited 38 times, 1 visits today)FacebookTwitterPinterestSave分享0last_img read more

Indiana Jones and the Mysterious Waterfall — Geocache of the Week

first_imgTraditionalGC3BH3Jby Valente Cruz SharePrint RelatedRaiders of the Lost Cache — Geocache of the WeekNovember 15, 2017In “Community”Top 10 Geocaches of the Week 2017December 27, 2017In “Geocache of the Week”When a geocache is more like a theme park. — Dead Men Tell No Tales (GC46ZT4) — Geocache of the WeekJanuary 29, 2014In “Community” Location:Aveiro, PortugalN 40° 52.163 W 008° 11.409 Indiana Jones and the Mysterious Waterfall — Geocache of the Week, GC3BH3JDeep within the wild greenery surrounding Rio de Frades canyon in Portugal, this T5 cache may put you in Indy’s shoes—or, maybe his wetsuit.Many geocachers feel an affinity for Indiana Jones and imagine they’re on amazing adventures in exotic locations, retrieving ancient artifacts worth millions of dollars. In all reality, many geo-adventures are closer to grabbing a lamp post cache from a parking lot on the outskirts of town, but the thrill is still there!  Difficulty:2Terrain:5center_img Continue to explore some of the most amazing geocaches around the world.Check out all of the Geocaches of the Week on the Geocaching blog. If you would like to nominate a Geocache of the Week, fill out this form.Share with your Friends:More 1234567<> Those who brave this trek initially park at the Postman Trailhead, explore cache GCPZHC, then climb alongside the river until they reach the lagoon. Whatever your approach, it’s advised to bring at least 15 meters (50 feet) of rope, a helmet, and a wetsuit, because that water is COLD. Above all, don’t forget your waterproof pen. You won’t want to go through all this work for nothing!At the lagoon and waterfallThe container is located on the outside of the waterfall, but since you’ve come this far, shimmy up the slippery rocks and explore the tunnel behind the waterfall! This T5 is definitely challenging, but with 140 Favorite points and an 86% Favorite point rating, you know the effort is worth it. The cache page states: In order to complete the cache it is essential that they know how to swim well or, if not, they should wear a vest. As an alternative to swimming, you can climb the wall to the left of the waterfall and “uncork” next to it. You can also go down the river through canyoning, although the charm and challenge may be smaller than the climb.You must enter the tunnel behind the waterfall!It wasn’t until Indiana Jones and the Kingdom of the Crystal Skull, the fourth movie in the series, that we actually see our hero go over a waterfall. Although that movie takes place in South America, this homage in Portugal is a fantastic way to take your adventuring to a new level.last_img read more

Intro to Total Force Fitness

first_imgUnder the coordination and leadership of the Samueli Institute, the December 2010 “Military Medicine” magazine dedicated its entire issue to a new health paradigm that was then emerging for the U.S. military known as Total Force Fitness (TFF). Samueli Institute CEO Wayne B. Jonas served as a co-editor and as an author with military health colleagues.TFF has evolved in response to the nature of the Iraq and Afghanistan conflicts and the expectation that the U.S. Armed Forces will be similarly engaged in the years ahead. In an “era of persistent conflict,” successful execution of the military mission will require “…continuous optimal performance, resilience and recovery.”As issue co-editor Col. Beverly C. Land wrote, not only are “Physical injury patterns from blast and (IEDs) clearly different … Not so easily identified and treated are the so-called ‘hidden’ injuries—hearing, vision, and now the more often diagnosed concussions, post-traumatic stress disorder, and anxiety. The personal and professional burden they create for our returning warriors is potentially overwhelming.”Download the complete 132 page issue at www.samueliinstitute.org.The TFF initiative grew from the U.S. Army’s efforts to address these conditions so prevalent in today’s modern conflicts by consolidating a group of “strengths” for continuous evaluation: physical, social, emotional, family, and spiritual. In 2009 then Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff AdmiralMichael Mullen broadened the focus to expand upon those domains and to create a framework that encompassed all branches of the service and incorporated the well-being of Service member families affected by deployments and the resulting consequences. In November 2009, Adm. Mullen tasked the Consortium for Human and Military Performance at the Uniformed Services University of Health Sciences in Bethesda, Md. to host a workshop of leading health specialists. Samueli Institute coordinated the event and contributed significantly to the establishment of TFF principles that were subsequently outlined in the special issue of Military Medicine.The results of the workshop expanded the number of fitness domains that constitute Total Force Fitness to include each of the following:PhysicalPsychologicalBehavioral and OccupationalMedical and EnvironmentalNutritionalSpiritualSocialFamilyIn her comments Col. Land writes, “This program would be prevention-focused, individual-centric and the family would be recognized as central to the total force fitness equation.” She notes that TFF is part of the broader Department of Defense (DoD) emphasis, “to create a culture within DoD that values health and fitness and empowers individuals and organizations to actualize those values and achieve optimal health.”The issue chapter “Why Total Force Fitness” sets out the rationale for adopting the holistic approach to armed services health requirements.“ The answer is that the current paradigm is failing.The demands on current warfighters and their families are overwhelming the resilience capacity of our service members. The military services are experiencing rampant post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), scores of injuries, family casualties, and increasing suicide rates. The burden is high and the framework of the current response does not match the circumstance or need.Subsequent chapters  describe the potential within the primary domains to redress these conditions and to provide a coherent framework for enhancing the health of service members and their families. Samueli Institute, through its Military Medical Research program, has helped explore a number of these domains in partnership with military health leaders and unit commanders.From the standpoint of the Military Families Learning Network and our continuing efforts to leverage the Cooperative Extension System (CES) as a force-multiplier for family readiness, the Total Force Fitness program offers an excellent opportunity to showcase how  CES programs and expertise, derived from the Land Grant Universities that CES resides within, can supplement, enhance, and catalyze resilience and health in each of the TFF domains.Friday Field Notes will continue to feature evidence-based best management practices from across the Cooperative Extension System, linking them explicitly to specific TFF domains.  It is our hope that this effort will make it clearer how the CES is a fundamental part of the Total Force Fitness equation.Adm. Mullen (Ret) writes in the introduction to the special issue:Total force fitness is more than a physical fitness; it is the sum total of the many facets of individuals, their families, and the organization in which they serve. It is a state of being.He encouraged the military health and military families communities to: “Keep your minds open to creative new concepts and possibilities. Critically evaluate the role of complementary and alternative medicine. Explore the anecdotal evidence regarding total force fitness and then develop scientific protocols to put these observations to objective tests… ” The Military Families Learning Network is taking up his challenge.last_img read more