Why some people are resistant to Alzheimer’s

first_img Related Environment counts, Alzheimer’s research suggests The Daily Gazette Sign up for daily emails to get the latest Harvard news. The investigators suspect that carrying two copies of the APOE3ch variant may postpone the clinical onset of Alzheimer’s disease by limiting tau pathology and neurodegeneration.“This single case opens a new door for treatments of Alzheimer’s disease, based more on the resistance to Alzheimer’s pathology rather than on the cause of the disease. In other words, not necessarily focusing on reduction of pathology, as it has been done traditionally in the field, but instead promoting resistance even in the face of significant brain pathology,” said Quiroz.APOE3 is one form of the APOE gene, the major susceptibility gene for late-onset Alzheimer’s. The APOE gene provides instructions for making a protein called apolipoprotein E, which is involved in the metabolism of fats in the body. Experiments revealed that the APOE3ch variant may reduce the ability of apolipoprotein E to bind to certain sugars called heparan sulphate proteoglycans (HSPG), which have been implicated in processes involving amyloid beta and tau proteins.“This finding suggests that artificially modulating the binding of APOE to HSPG could have potential benefits for the treatment of Alzheimer’s disease, even in the context of high levels of amyloid pathology,” said co–lead author Joseph F. Arboleda-Velasquez of the Schepens Eye Research Institute.“This study underscores the importance of APOE in the development, treatment, and prevention of Alzheimer’s, not to mention the profound impact that even one research volunteer can have in the fight against this terrible disease,” said Eric M. Reiman, executive director of Banner Alzheimer’s Institute and co-senior author of the study. “We hope that our findings galvanize and inform the discovery of APOE-related drug and gene therapies, such that we can put them to the test in treatment and prevention studies as soon as possible.”The research in this study is funded by the National Institutes of Health (NIH), Massachusetts General Hospital Executive Committee on Research, Alzheimer’s Association, Grimshaw-Gudewicz Charitable Foundation, Banner Alzheimer’s Foundation, Nomis Foundation, State of Arizona, and Anonymous Foundation. Findings point to role of natural selection in disease A new study provides insights on why some people may be more resistant to Alzheimer’s disease than others. The findings may lead to strategies to delay or prevent the condition.The study was led by investigators at Harvard-affiliated Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH), in collaboration with the University of Antioquia, Schepens Eye Research Institute of Massachusetts Eye and Ear, and Banner Alzheimer’s Institute.According to researchers, some people who carry mutations in genes known to cause early onset Alzheimer’s disease do not show signs of the condition until a very old age — much later than expected. Studying these individuals may reveal insights on gene variants that reduce the risk of developing Alzheimer’s disease and other forms of dementia.In their Nature Medicine study, Yakeel T. Quiroz, a clinical neuropsychologist and neuroimaging researcher at MGH, and her colleagues describe one such patient, from a large extended family with more than 6,000 living members from Colombia, who did not develop mild cognitive impairment until her 70s, nearly three decades after the typical age of onset.Like her relatives who showed signs of dementia in their 40s, the patient carried the E280A mutation in a gene called Presenilin 1 (PSEN1), which has been shown to cause early onset Alzheimer’s disease. She also had two copies of a gene variation called ChristChurch, named after the New Zealand city where it was first found in the APOE3 gene (APOE3ch). The team was unable to identify any additional family members who had two copies of this variation who also carried the PSEN1 E280A mutation. In an analysis of 117 kindred members, 6 percent had one copy of the APOE3ch mutation, including four PSEN1 E280A mutation carriers who showed signs of mild cognitive impairment at the average age of 45 years.Imaging tests revealed only minor neurodegeneration in the patient’s brain. Surprisingly, the patient had unusually high brain levels of amyloid beta deposits, a hallmark of Alzheimer’s disease; however, the amount of tau tangles — another hallmark of the disease — was relatively limited.center_img How a doctor learned to become a caregiver Exposure to new activities may delay onset of dementia A new understanding of Alzheimer’s After his beloved wife was diagnosed with Alzheimer’s, Arthur Kleinman discovered that what he didn’t know was a lot last_img read more

Reigate & Redhill

first_imgTo access this article REGISTER NOWWould you like print copies, app and digital replica access too? SUBSCRIBE for as little as £5 per week. Would you like to read more?Register for free to finish this article.Sign up now for the following benefits:Four FREE articles of your choice per monthBreaking news, comment and analysis from industry experts as it happensChoose from our portfolio of email newsletterslast_img

New chief executive at Austria’s Valida to focus on Vorsorgekassen

first_imgHe also stressed that the company “would be ready” should demand increase in the Austrian occupational pensions market.For the Vorsorgekasse, Eberhartinger said he wanted to invest in a sales strategy, as this was a market “guaranteed to grow”.In Austria, each employer must pay part of an employee’s salaries into a Vorsorgekasse, or provident fund, to provide for a future severance payment upon leaving the company.Eberhartinger was appointed to Valida’s board of directors last year to assist with a revamp of its administration.Last week, it was announced that former chief executive Andreas Zakostelsky would focus on his political role as an MP and his position as head of the Pensionskassen association FVPK.New chief executive Eberhartinger is to focus on the Pensionskassen and consultancy side of the business.He will share the board with Albert Gaubitzer, who will focus mostly on the Vorsorgekassen business and IT.Eberhartinger told IPE his new job was a “completely new role”.“So far, I have always built pension fund businesses from scratch, but now I have to streamline an existing pension fund business,” he said.Eberhartinger said a wide-ranging “streamlining” process, taking “at least 3-5 years to complete”, would cover the actuarial accounting of individual pension portfolios of a company.Currently, this is handled by four different people, depending on how a client comes to Valida – via a direct sale, for example, or as a former consultancy client that transfers its pension fund.The new strategy will require new client-relationship management, Eberhartinger said, to ensure a “single face to the customer” policy.The new chief executive confirmed that, over the long term, his aim was to integrate Valida’s two Pensionskassen – one being the former Siemens Pensionskasse now known as Valida Industrie – into a single entity.He also wants to exploit more “synergies” with Valida shareholder Raiffeisen, “where it is reasonable and cheaper”, which will also mean representatives will hold seats on the supervisory board of Valida subsidiaries.The chairs on the supervisory boards of the Valida subsidiares vacated by Zakostelsky will, however, be filled by Eberhartinger and Gaubitzer themselves, respectively.Click here to read more about the scramble for Vorsorgekassen clients Direct sales activities will be scaled back for Valida Vorsorge Management’s Pensionskassen business as part of a re-structuring, according to Stefan Eberhartinger, the group’s new chief executive.  Valida Vorsorge Management is the holding comprising the Valida Pensionskasse, the Valida Vorsorgekasse and a consultancy.Speaking with IPE, Eberhartinger said: “The market is currently too small, and active sales produce too little margins.”He confirmed that Valida would continue to take part in tenders, however, and serve clients who come to the group.last_img read more

Wenger: Welbeck a different animal

first_imgArsene Wenger has played down echoes of Thierry Henry in Danny Welbeck but insisted he can become Arsenal’s beast in the box. “You need to be in the middle and wait for your chance to kill the opponent. On the flank you have less of that responsibility. “It’s not a question of potential, it is more a nervous problem because in training he scores goals like a real striker. “He rushed his finishing until now because he didn’t score.” Arsenal demolished Villa, who were affected by a virus which ruled out Darren Bent, Nathan Baker and Ashley Westwood. Midfielder Westwood pulled out of the warm-up while the sick Andreas Weimann was replaced at half-time and Fabian Delph and Brad Guzan played despite illness. The squad have the day off on Monday as the club look to stop the bug spreading but it is understood they will return to training on Tuesday. Boss Paul Lambert said: “I thought we might have got away with it but people seem to be dropping all the time. I’m not a medical person but I’ve not had anything as bad as this before. “Fabian had it in the build-up to the Liverpool game, Brad had it and it’s been like dominoes. “Fabian’s been brilliant and he kept going. It’s just mother nature and I couldn’t fault the lads for their effort.” Chairman Randy Lerner was also at the ground to watch his first home game in almost two years. “We’ll no doubt go for a bit to eat, I’ll see the chairman before he flies back,” added Lambert. Lambert also confirmed Christian Benteke will not play in Monday’s under-21 match with Derby as he recovers from a ruptured Achilles. Welbeck played as a central striker, rather than out wide as he did at Old Trafford, leading to comparisons with Henry’s Gunners career. Wenger brought the Frenchman from Juventus in 1999 and helped transform him from a winger into Arsenal’s record goalscorer. But he was quick to play down early similarities with the Gunners legend. “Look, give me some time, it is a bit early to say that when you look at the number of goals Thierry Henry scored,” said Wenger. “I think Danny has an interesting potential and let’s see how he develops. He has a good mentality, good physical potential, technical potential and he contributes to our team play because he doesn’t lose the ball and those are important qualities. Thierry is a good act to follow and I have nothing against it.” But Wenger insisted, now he has grabbed his first Arsenal goal, Welbeck has rediscovered his animal instinct in the box. “He has played wide at Manchester United, never through the middle,” he said. “You lose a little bit of that instinct to score and also that pressure, which is a bit animalistic. The £16million forward opened his Gunners account in their 3-0 win at Aston Villa on Saturday. Three strikes in under four minutes from Mesut Ozil, Welbeck and Aly Cissokho’s own goal saw Arsenal hit back after their 2-0 Champions League defeat at Borussia Dortmund. Press Associationlast_img read more

City’s top girls’ post player Saunders commits to Gannon

first_imgON THE BOARDS—Lanise Saunders from Allderdice fights for a rebound against Westinghouse in City League action last season. (Courier Photo/William McBride/File) by Malik VincentIt’s not just her 6’2” frame that attracted programs wishing to sign Lanise Saunders to a full athletic scholarship. In fact, multiple sources have indicated that it’s just a plus.Cleve Wright, Saunders’ future college basketball coach at Division II Gannon University in Erie, certainly thinks so, as well. “The thing that made me want Lanise to be a part of this program the most was who she is,” Wright said. “People who have the type of heart that she has, make great teammates. And her size, intelligence, and knowledge of the game is certainly something we will be glad to have.”Saunders was a 2011 selection to the New Pittsburgh Courier All-City first team for her great junior campaign in which her Allderdice team was crowned league champs.To go along with what she brings to the court, Saunders has a 4.217 grade point average. That has attracted Division-I interest from Ivy League programs like Princeton and the University of Pennsylvania.“I just felt extremely comfortable with Gannon,” said Saunders, who signed a National Letter of Intent in November. “Yes, going to the Division I school would have been nice, but after visiting Erie and meeting their coaching staff and everyone, I know this was the right place for me.”The starting center for the City League girls basketball three-peat Dragons plans to major in electrical engineering in college. Her coach, Dave Walcheskey, believes that her smarts, hard work, and dedication is what makes her such a success.“A player of her caliber comes maybe once every 15 years or so,” he said. “She’s such a quiet leader and helps us in so many ways. She’s a very unselfish player. Her stats would be much higher, if she didn’t look out for her teammates so much. Her persistence to get better and how smart she is, really has made her into such a great player for us.”She attributes most of her success to a best friendship that she has with, who most people consider Allderdice’s best player, Janay Bottoms. The 5’4” point guard was honored as the Courier’s girls’ basketball player of the year this past June. She was pictured on the front cover— with superintendent of schools, Linda Lane— in the honorary luncheon’s special tabloid edition.“If it wasn’t for the never-ending support of Janay and her family, I’m not sure where I’d be,” Saunders said. “I wasn’t the best player starting out. I always had good size, but I was pretty uncoordinated there was so much I had to learn about the game. She would stay after practice with me and make sure I improved.”The dynamic duo has shared much success. But Saunders recalls one moment when her friend called her at the beginning of last season and made a bold prediction.“(Janay) called me and told me that we were going to go 16-0. She said we weren’t going to lose a single game,” she added. “We were going to be perfect and that we’d get another championship.”Lo and behold, the Dragons did exactly that and got past Westinghouse, a perennial power in the City, for the third time to claim the title. Saunders made it plain that she wants another one before it’s all said and done.“I think we have what it takes to get another one before I go to college,” Saunders mentioned. “We have some new talent coming in and I can’t wait to get them in and going. It should be a good year.”(Malik Vincent can be reached at [email protected]­pittsburghcourier.com or on [email protected])last_img read more