Curiosity’s Drill Hole and Location are Picture Perfect

first_img Subscribe Pasadena’s ‘626 Day’ Aims to Celebrate City, Boost Local Economy More Cool Stuff Name (required)  Mail (required) (not be published)  Website  First Heatwave Expected Next Week Make a comment faithfernandez More » ShareTweetShare on Google+Pin on PinterestSend with WhatsApp,Virtual Schools PasadenaHomes Solve Community/Gov/Pub SafetyCitizen Service CenterPASADENA EVENTS & ACTIVITIES CALENDARClick here for Movie Showtimes Community News EVENTS & ENTERTAINMENT | FOOD & DRINK | THE ARTS | REAL ESTATE | HOME & GARDEN | WELLNESS | SOCIAL SCENE | GETAWAYS | PARENTS & KIDS Science and Technology Curiosity’s Drill Hole and Location are Picture Perfect Article and Photo courtesy of NASA/JPL-Caltech Published on Friday, October 2, 2015 | 2:41 pm Top of the News center_img This composite image looking toward the higher regions of Mount Sharp was taken on September 9, 2015, by NASA’s Curiosity rover. In the foreground — about 2 miles (3 kilometers) from the rover — is a long ridge teeming with hematite, an iron oxide. Credits: NASA/JPL-Caltech/MSSSOn Tuesday, Sept. 29, NASA’s Curiosity Mars rover drilled its eighth hole on Mars, and its fifth since reaching Mount Sharp one year ago. The drilling of the hole 2.6-inches (65 millimeters) deep in a rock the team labeled “Big Sky” is part of a multi-day, multi-step sequence that will result in the analysis of the Martian rock’s ingredients in the rover’s two onboard laboratories – the Chemistry and Mineralogy X-Ray diffractometer (CheMin) and the Sample Analysis at Mars (SAM) instrument suite.“With Big Sky, we found the ordinary sandstone rock we were looking for,” said Curiosity Project Scientist Ashwin Vasavada. “It also happens to be relatively near sandstone that looks as though it has been altered by fluids — likely groundwater with other dissolved chemicals. We are hoping to drill that rock next, compare the results, and understand what changes have taken place.”The analyses of the Big Sky rock-powder samples by CheMin and SAM will occur over the next week. Meanwhile, the team will be turning the rover’s attention and its wheels towards the second rock, where the sample analysis process will begin anew.Curiosity is currently on the lower slopes of Mount Sharp in a region covered in sandstone called the Stimson Unit. Two weeks ago, still in the same general vicinity, Curiosity took a pair of long-range images toward higher regions of the mountain. In the foreground — about 2 miles (3 kilometers) from the rover — is a long ridge teeming with hematite, an iron oxide. Just beyond is an undulating plain rich in clay minerals. And just beyond that are a multitude of rounded buttes, all high in sulfate minerals. The changing mineralogy in these layers of Mount Sharp suggests a changing environment in early Mars, though all involve exposure to water billions of years ago. The Curiosity team hopes to be able to explore these diverse areas in the months and years ahead. Farther back in the image are striking, light-toned cliffs in rock that may have formed in drier times and now are heavily eroded by winds.“The only thing more stunning than these images is the thought that Curiosity will be driving through those lower hills one day,” Vasavada said. “We couldn’t help but send a postcard back to all those following her journey.”NASA’s Mars Science Laboratory Project is using Curiosity to assess ancient habitable environments and major changes in Martian environmental conditions. NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory, a division of Caltech, built the rover and manages the project for NASA’s Science Mission Directorate in Washington.For more information about Curiosity, visit http://www.jpl.nasa.gov/msl , http://www.nasa.gov/msl and http://mars.jpl.nasa.gov/msl/. You can follow the mission on Facebook at http://www.facebook.com/marscuriosity and on Twitter at http://www.twitter.com/marscuriosity. Pasadena Will Allow Vaccinated People to Go Without Masks in Most Settings Starting on Tuesday HerbeautyShort On Time? 10-Minute Workouts Are Just What You NeedHerbeautyHerbeautyHerbeauty10 Questions To Start Conversation Way Better Than ‘How U Doing?’HerbeautyHerbeautyHerbeauty8 Yoga Poses To Overcome Stress And AnxietyHerbeautyHerbeautyHerbeauty5 Things To Avoid If You Want To Have Whiter TeethHerbeautyHerbeautyHerbeautyThe Most Obvious Sign A Guy Likes You Is When He Does ThisHerbeautyHerbeautyHerbeauty9 Of The Best Family Friendly Dog BreedsHerbeautyHerbeauty 0 commentsShareShareTweetSharePin it Get our daily Pasadena newspaper in your email box. Free.Get all the latest Pasadena news, more than 10 fresh stories daily, 7 days a week at 7 a.m. Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked * Business News Community News Home of the Week: Unique Pasadena Home Located on Madeline Drive, Pasadenalast_img read more

DNR warns of cold water and debris in rivers

first_imgHigh water and swift currents on Iowa rivers are prompting the Department of Natural Resources to warn kayakers and canoers to find other options.River Programs outreach coordinator,Todd Robertson, says the conditions are dangerous especially for rookies and he has this advice.“Make sure you know how to control your boat properly, that you’re an efficient paddler. The best way to do that is to stay off of moving water and start practicing on flat water. Right now with the way rivers are, flat water and lakes are the safest place to be,” according to Roberston. Robertson says because the air temperatures have been well below normal, the water temperatures are cold. He says that could cause problems if you capsize because the shock of the cold may be disorienting. Robertson says the high water is sweeping a significant amount of extra material into the fast-moving current..“When you get a lot of rain, if you went and stood by the river and looked upstream you would see all this debris coming downstream,” Robertson says, “trees, tree limbs, things that have washed in off the bank, those things can be very hazardous for people.” Robertson says life jackets are a must for boaters, kayakers and canoers. He says according to Iowa law, adults do not have to wear a life jacket but there must be one onboard for each person. Children aged 12 and under are required to wear them at all times.last_img read more

Encouraging a Liberian Innovation to Fight Ebola

first_imgThe Daily Observer on page nine of yesterday’s edition carried a story of an improved Ebola bucket developed by a Liberian. The Ebola bucket with the faucet for hand washing that now appears at the entrance of nearly all public and private premises in the country since the outbreak of the deadly virus, contains a solution of chlorine and detergents referred to as the “Ebola soup”,  highly promoted to help stop the transmission of the virus. The bucket’s flaw that undermines its purpose, however, is that the scores or even hundreds of users handle the faucets to turn them on and off. Lewis K. Tealeh, a senior   communication specialist at the Liberia Petroleum Refining Company (LPRC), has licked the flaw by developing an electronically powered faucet for the bucket.  This enhancement makes the Ebola bucket hands free. Users do not need to touch the faucet to turn it on and off.  Instead, the faucet is electronically powered by a battery that is activated by the hand washer’s foot. The battery is installed on the floor near the bucket. Mr. Tealeh has a dream of mass producing this new type of bucket so that it becomes available to people throughout the country.  But he needs help!He is hoping that someone in government or in the local or international community, such as his own organization, LPRC, the National Port Authority (NPA), the Liberia Water and Sewer Corporation (LWSC); or the European Union, the American, Dutch or Norwegian governments could help him fulfill his dream to mass produce this bucket and make it available to all in Liberia.Not only would it help people to take yet another step away from this deadly Ebola virus.  It would also put some money into the hands of this creative young Liberian.  This could inspire and empower him to conceive and develop more innovations, leading to a stream of technological inventions to improve people’s lives, create wealth and contribute to the nation’s modernization.Remember the elementary beginning of the Wright Brothers in North Carolina, USA, who were mere bicycle sellers and mechanics.  Yet in the early 1900s they embarked upon an innovation that led to the invention of the airplane. Henry Ford, too, was an ordinary fellow in Detroit when he experimented with engines and tires that led to the invention of the automobile.Alexander Graham Bell was trying to improve communication between himself and his hearing-impaired wife that led to the invention of the telephone.We pray that somebody with the means will reach out to this Liberian, Lewis Tealeh, and help him mass produce this timely innovation springing out of a health crisis that has forced us to change and adopt the habit of washing hands upon entering public and private premises.Liberians must begin to think and act to help our inventors, especially at this critical time—people like Mr. Tealeh. Let us do better than our well-to-do forebears, many of whom failed to develop our elementary and high schools that educated themselves.  Rather, when they became rich, instead of giving back to these schools that made them, by educating their children there and helping to further develop and modernize those schools, they sent their children abroad for primary, secondary and higher education, leaving the schools destitute.  These schools included the College of West Africa, St. Patrick’s and St. Teresa’s High and institutions in Grand Bassa, Sinoe, Cape Mount and Cape Palmas.  After the missionaries departed many of these institutions declined and are today mostly substandard or almost nonexistent.Because very few wealthy people, if any, reached out to Liberia’s blind musical genius, Howard Benedict (Baby) Hayes, he died poor in his house on Front (now Sao Boso) Street.  Yet there were many wealthy families right on that same street.  Baby Hayes produced many musical masterpieces, including songs and operas.  And it is said that even though blind, he was often called upon by many churches and individuals to repair and tune their organs and pianos. We pray that a new generation  of Liberians will emerge with  the heart, mindset and vision  to start reaching out to help creative people in our  country—those in the creative   arts, literature, in the sciences and technology, and Liberian agriculturists, too, who have the talent and dream to move our country forward. Share this:Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)last_img read more