Brandon “Taz” Niederauer Band Added To Lettuce’s Funk Of Ages With Snarky Puppy, Turkuaz, & More

first_imgThis weekend, Lettuce is hosting their first-ever celebration of funk music at The Fillmore Philadelphia, dubbed Funk Of Ages: Past, Present & Future. The world-dominating future-funk trailblazers will host an incredible lineup of bands to honor the “Funk of Ages,” including multi-Grammy Award-winning funk/jazz/R&B ensemble Snarky Puppy, nine piece modern “power funk” act Turkuaz, Snarky bandleader Michael League‘s world-beat side project Bokanté (featuring Roosevelt Collier and more), and CT-based ensemble Funky Dawgz Brass Band.And now, The Brandon Niederauer Band has just been added to this incredible lineup! Fourteen-year-old “Taz” has been wow-ing audiences since before he entered double digits, gaining the respect of Derek Trucks, Warren Haynes, and George Porter Jr. along the way. The young guitarist is well-versed in all things funk, rock, and blues, with a pocket full of originals ready to rock.Armed with an un-fuck-withable crew of musicians, Funk of Ages is set to elevate fans’ understanding and appreciation of funk music, providing a tour of different eras and approaches to the sound. From early innovators and modern-day funk ambassadors (Lettuce), to avant-garde jazz-funk heavyweights (Snarky), to modern funk with mass appeal (Turkuaz), “Funk of Ages” will highlight and celebrate all ends of the genre’s sprawling spectrum for one incredible funky day of music!Live For Live Music Presents Funk of Ages: Past, Present & Future will take place on June 24th at The Fillmore. Tickets are available here.In addition to the evening’s festivities inside the venue, Funk of Ages will also include a free block party from 1-4pm. Outside of The Fillmore and Punch Line Philly, there will be gourmet food, craft beers, beverages, beer gardens, yard games, and more for guests to enjoy. Music will be provided by the Funky Dawgz Brass Band and others, while the day begins to take shape in a way like never before. Join Philly in showcasing their commitment to one-of-a-kind live music events at the first-ever Fillmore Block Party![cover photo by Josh Timmermans]last_img read more

Winter Storm Preparedness

first_imgIt’s a Southern tradition. Whenever the forecast calls for snow, folks dash to the store and deplete the supply of bread and milk. But if you’re iced in for a few days, bread and milk won’t keep your family going for long or do much to maintain the morale of snowbound children and adults.So how do you make the average home a fully-stocked winter weather shelter? It doesn’t take much, but the key is to prepare before winter storms arrive.Before the stormEmergencies don’t call ahead for reservations. Preparing for disruptive weather in advance means you’ll be ready whenever it comes. During good weather, University of Georgia Extension experts recommend winterizing your home by:Insulating walls and atticsSealing air leaks around windows and doors with caulk or weather-strippingInstalling storm doors and windows, or covering windows with plastic UGA Extension specialists encourage Georgians to build an emergency food supply for emergencies ranging from winter storms to spring floods. As you routinely grocery shop, purchase one or two extra shelf-stable, ready-to-eat canned goods, like non-condensed soup, canned chicken breast and tuna, pasta meals and vegetables. This will build an emergency food supply without adding too much to your grocery bill each week. Unlike frozen foods, canned foods won’t be damaged by a long power outage. Make sure you have a manual can opener, too. Avoid dry foods like pasta and rice. They are stable, but they require water and cooking, luxuries that may be in short supply during a storm.The Federal Emergency Management Agency recommends stocking at least a three-day supply of adequate nutrition, water and prescription medications for each family member, including pets and livestock. Why three days? That’s how long it may take to restore electricity and clear roads of ice, fallen trees and other hazards. In recent U.S. natural disasters, actual restoration of electricity, water and transportation can take much longer.To get through disruptive storms or other emergencies, also store the following items:Water – one gallon per person per day for drinking and hygieneAn alternate heat source and fuel, like a hefty supply of firewood for the fireplace or wood-burning stoveFlashlights with extra batteriesNOAA weather radioEntertainment – There’s a lot of idle waiting time when you’re storm-stuck. Books, cards, board games and energy-releasing activities (besides hauling firewood) can keep cabin fever at bay.During the stormUse foods from the refrigerator first, then frozen foods, then canned foods. If the oven isn’t working, use coals from the fireplace to heat food or cook outside on your grill. Don’t bring the grill indoors as this can cause deadly carbon monoxide to build up inside.Long term food storageCanned foods keep for months, but oxygen inside the packaging causes food quality to decline over time. Working with a grant from NASA, food scientists at the University of Georgia are working on a process that squeezes so much oxygen out of food it can retain just-picked quality for years. The idea is to make comfort foods like macaroni and cheese available to astronauts on multi-year journeys to Mars, but it’s also applicable to long-term food storage here on Earth. The researchers have brought oxygen levels down to parts-per-million, but they’re aiming for parts-per-billion. Until then, it’s best to periodically use and replace items in your emergency food supply to keep them fresh.Car kitsWhile most Southerners avoid driving whenever ice and snow threatens, it’s also prudent to store a few supplies in you car. Collect the following items for your vehicle’s emergency supply kit:Ready-to-eat foodsBottled waterBlanketCandles and matchesWhistleHand-crank flashlight and radioWarm clothes and bootsHeavy work glovesToiletry itemsIt’s a good idea to have a similar kit in your work place in case conditions prevent you from getting home.For more information on emergency preparedness, download UGA Extension’s Home Emergency Preparedness Handbook from www.fcs.uga.edu/ext/pubs/hace/HACE-E-86.pdf or visit www.ready.gov/.last_img read more