10 of Stuart Scotts Most Memorable Clever Catch Phrases

On television, Stuart Scott represented Black people’s creativity, soul, mind, humor, style and overall culture. That’s part of the legacy he leaves behind as an ESPN personality—a quick-witted, clever, smart and engaging broadcaster who made you smile as you watched sports highlights, using everything from pop culture to street slang to get across the point in an entertaining way. Not everyone can do that. Only a few can, in fact. Scott might have been the best at it. Here are 10 of his on-air catch phrases that made you smile.“You Ain’t Gotta Go Home, But You Gotta Get The Heck Outta Here”Anyone who has partied at a nightclub has heard the deejay, near the end of the event, use that expression. No one heard it on television until Scott used it to describe a buzzer beater or strike out in baseball.“See, what had happened was. . . “Hilarious. Ever try to awkwardly explain to someone an error in that way? Sure, you have. Scott came with it when a player made a particularly glaring mistake. The humor of it lightened the magnitude of the miscue. read more

Cockiness in the Cockpit More from Myles Munroe Crash

first_img Related Items:cockpit, crash, investigaTION, myles munroe Facebook Twitter Google+LinkedInPinterestWhatsApp Facebook Twitter Google+LinkedInPinterestWhatsAppProvidenciales, 03 Mar 2015 – The cockpit voice recorder exposes what appears to be more pilot error in the plane crash of Best Selling Author, Bahamian Dr. Myles Munroe. The Tribune newspaper reveals fragments of the conversation which was captured by the device, and in a newspaper article revealed that one of the pilots actually told the Terrain Automatic Warning System (TAWS) to, and I quote, ‘awwh shut up’ before shutting off the device which was actually warning them that they were flying ‘too low’ and needed to ‘pull up.’ Despite both pilots being licensed and certified by the FAA and having spotless records, the recently released report showed that the men made a series of inexplicable decisions that ultimately doomed the flight and resulted in all nine on board dying when the plane collided with a crane, burst into flames and crash on November 9th 2014 over Freeport, Grand Bahama. Recommended for you Veras confirmed as second murder, investigation launched Two stabbings, two shootings including attempted murder say Police Police sends assurances about Kevino Smith Investigationlast_img read more

Wife of Eddie Gallagher and Congressman Duncan D Hunter defend prosecuted Navy

first_img KUSI Newsroom, February 19, 2019 Wife of Eddie Gallagher and Congressman Duncan D. Hunter defend prosecuted Navy SEAL Updated: 10:11 AM 00:00 00:00 spaceplay / pause qunload | stop ffullscreenshift + ←→slower / faster ↑↓volume mmute ←→seek  . seek to previous 12… 6 seek to 10%, 20% … 60% XColor SettingsAaAaAaAaTextBackgroundOpacity SettingsTextOpaqueSemi-TransparentBackgroundSemi-TransparentOpaqueTransparentFont SettingsSize||TypeSerif MonospaceSerifSans Serif MonospaceSans SerifCasualCursiveSmallCapsResetSave SettingsSAN DIEGO (KUSI) — Special Operations Chief Edward Gallagher has pleaded not guilty to charges stemming from a 2017 deployment to Iraq.Prosecutors say he killed a teenage Islamic State fighter under his care and then held his reenlistment ceremony with the corpse.They also accuse Gallagher of shooting two civilians in Iraq and firing inadvertently into crowds.Congressman Duncan Hunter has recently sent a letter to President Trump asking him to directly intervene in the court martial proceedings on Gallagher. Hunter’s letter alleges political bias against Gallagher.Congressman Hunter and Andrea Gallagher, Edward’s wife, appeared on Good Morning San Diego to defend Edward.A military judge has postponed the murder trial of a Navy SEAL accused of fatally stabbing an Iraqi war prisoner.The three-month delay came Wednesday after defense lawyers asked for more time to go over the prosecution’s evidence.Defense attorney Phil Stackhouse said his team has received more than 1,000 pages of material from the prosecution since the end of January.The trial has been reset for May 28. center_img KUSI Newsroom Categories: Good Morning San Diego, Local San Diego News FacebookTwitter Posted: February 19, 2019last_img read more

Researchers show that nucleosomes can inhibit CRISPRCas9 cleavage efficiency

first_img More information: Robert M. Yarrington et al. Nucleosomes inhibit target cleavage by CRISPR-Cas9 in vivo, Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences (2018). DOI: 10.1073/pnas.1810062115AbstractGenome editing with CRISPR-Cas nucleases has been applied successfully to a wide range of cells and organisms. There is, however, considerable variation in the efficiency of cleavage and outcomes at different genomic targets, even within the same cell type. Some of this variability is likely due to the inherent quality of the interaction between the guide RNA and the target sequence, but some may also reflect the relative accessibility of the target. We investigated the influence of chromatin structure, particularly the presence or absence of nucleosomes, on cleavage by the Streptococcus pyogenes Cas9 protein. At multiple target sequences in two promoters in the yeast genome, we find that Cas9 cleavage is strongly inhibited when the DNA target is within a nucleosome. This inhibition is relieved when nucleosomes are depleted. Remarkably, the same is not true of zinc-finger nucleases (ZFNs), which cleave equally well at nucleosome-occupied and nucleosome-depleted sites. These results have implications for the choice of specific targets for genome editing, both in research and in clinical and other practical applications. A team of researchers at the University of Utah has found that nucleosomes can inhibit CRISPR/Cas9 cleavage efficiency. In their paper published in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, the group describes testing the gene editing technique on yeast samples and what they found. Journal information: Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences Illustration of Cas9 binding to DNA. The top figure shows two nucleosomes surrounding a nucleosome-free stretch of DNA. Hypothetical PAM sites for Cas9 targets in the central region and the right-hand nucleosome are shown in red. The lower figure shows Cas9 (with sgRNA) bound to the central target, with the PAM and flanking DNA held deep in the protein cleft. The PAM in the nucleosome could not be accessed without dissociating the DNA from the histone core. DNA backbones are blue; the RNA backbone is teal; DNA and RNA bases are white, except for the PAM; histones are green; Cas9 is purple. Credit: Janet Iwasa (University of Utah, Salt Lake City). Citation: Researchers show that nucleosomes can inhibit CRISPR-Cas9 cleavage efficiency (2018, September 11) retrieved 18 August 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2018-09-nucleosomes-inhibit-crispr-cas9-cleavage-efficiency.html © 2018 Phys.orgcenter_img The gene editing technique CRISPR-Cas 9 uses guide RNA to find and snip out segments of DNA—but what happens when the targeted segment is part of a nucleosome? Prior research has suggested that in such instances, it is likely that cleavage efficiency would suffer. In this new effort, the researchers have carried out an in vivo test of such instances and found that prior research results were correct—using CRISPR-Cas 9 on nucleosomes may not work very well.DNA strands are tiny, but really long—approximately six feet long if stretched out. Because of that, cells have mechanisms for packing DNA into a cell nucleus. That mechanism involves rolling the strands into bunches around a given protein. Such rolled bunches are known as nucleosomes. Logic suggests that a technique for editing a strand of DNA might encounter difficulty because of accessibility issues. Other researchers have considered the possibility of such problems, but have studied them in test tubes or did their work on known strands that were not part of nucleosomes. In this new effort, the researchers sought to find out once and for all if CRISPR-Cas9 would work just as well editing strands that are part of nucleosomes in living tissue as it does on strands that are not.The work involved CRISPR-Cas9 gene editing using different guide RNAs in living yeast, which allowed for editing different targets. Some of the targets were in nucleosomes while others were not. The researchers report that cleavage efficiency was much lower in nucleosomes than in non-nucleosome areas. But they also found something else—when testing the gene editing technique called zinc fingers the same way, they found no such difference. The group suggests that in the future, gene editing efforts should start with nucleosome position maps to improve efficiency. Explore further Two unrelated studies result in discovery of CRISPR-Cas12a inhibitors This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only.last_img read more