KPCC Chief, Southern California Public Radio Founding President, CEO Bill Davis Steps Down

first_imglatest #1 KPCC Chief, Southern California Public Radio Founding President, CEO Bill Davis Steps Down From STAFF REPORTS Published on Wednesday, June 6, 2018 | 6:33 pm Business News Subscribe Get our daily Pasadena newspaper in your email box. Free.Get all the latest Pasadena news, more than 10 fresh stories daily, 7 days a week at 7 a.m. Pasadena’s ‘626 Day’ Aims to Celebrate City, Boost Local Economy Make a comment Pasadena Will Allow Vaccinated People to Go Without Masks in Most Settings Starting on Tuesday Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked * Herbeauty10 Female Celebs Women Love But Men Find UnattractiveHerbeautyHerbeautyHerbeautyHow To Lose Weight & Burn Fat While You SleepHerbeautyHerbeautyHerbeautyHe Is Totally In Love With You If He Does These 7 ThingsHerbeautyHerbeautyHerbeauty9 Of The Best Family Friendly Dog BreedsHerbeautyHerbeautyHerbeautyThe Most Heartwarming Moments Between Father And DaughterHerbeautyHerbeautyHerbeautyYou Can’t Wear Just Anything If You’re The President’s DaughterHerbeautyHerbeauty First Heatwave Expected Next Week Top of the News center_img Home of the Week: Unique Pasadena Home Located on Madeline Drive, Pasadena EVENTS & ENTERTAINMENT | FOOD & DRINK | THE ARTS | REAL ESTATE | HOME & GARDEN | WELLNESS | SOCIAL SCENE | GETAWAYS | PARENTS & KIDS More Cool Stuff The Board of Trustees of Southern California Public Radio (SCPR) announced today that Bill Davis, President and CEO, has decided to step down and begin the leadership transition process for the organization. Davis, who will continue in his current responsibilities through December 2019 or until his successor is appointed, will work closely with the SCPR Board to identify a new President and CEO for the organization.The SCPR Board also announced that Davis will assume the newly-created role of President Emeritus of SCPR following the transition period.Davis joined SCPR in 2001 as its Founding President and over his nearly 20-year tenure led its transformation from a struggling, underperforming public radio station into a powerful community voice serving a growing and diverse audience across Southern California. Davis significantly expanded SCPR’s audience, membership and financial performance and recruited and developed a top-notch staff at all levels—establishing an ethical and inclusive culture that attracts outstanding journalists and creative talent.“The pride I have in Southern California Public Radio’s success during my tenure as CEO will always pale in comparison with the many accomplishments of our team and the lasting value of my friendships with colleagues on the Board of Trustees and the staff,” said Mr. Davis. “Through the years, SCPR has benefited from an exceptionally engaged Board, which has supported me and our management team every step of the way.”“I am blessed to have the opportunity after 19 years to leave SCPR at its peak, with an outstanding team in place ready to take the organization to new heights,” Davis added. “I begin this transition with a vigorous commitment to ensuring SCPR continues to grow and prosper. I look forward to working with the Board to further refine our strategic path and to identify a leader who will build on SCPR’s excellence and its commitment to serving the diverse and growing Southern California audience.”Ana Valdez, Chair of the SCPR Board of Trustees, said, “Southern California Public Radio is in the best shape in its history thanks to Bill’s initiatives and community-first ethos. With a strong and diverse management team in place, a growing audience and expanding membership base, and the best financial results in its history, SCPR is poised not only for more growth and success, but also to continue its vitally important public service mission.“SCPR will continue to benefit from Bill’s vision and expertise, as we search for the best possible new leader to build on our accomplishments,” Valdez added. “The Board also looks forward to working with Bill on the completion of our strategic planning process during the transition period. Working together, we will further the diverse, inclusive and ethical culture that has thrived at SCPR for nearly two decades of rapid change in the industry and in the communities we serve. We are committed to ensuring a seamless and successful transition for SCPR and its audiences, members, employees, and partners.”A nationally known and respected broadcast professional, Davis led the production of a wide range of local news and public affairs programming and the development of compelling content across a range of broadcast, digital and live event platforms. In addition to its public radio network, SCPR interacts with audiences through its web site, mobile and social media channels and through live events and has become a nationally recognized leader in public service journalism and civic engagement.These initiatives and investments resulted in impressive audience growth and an equally impressive expansion in membership and funding. SCPR’s audience has grown from 200,000 in 2000 to 800,000 in 2018, and it has added a digital audience that now totals 800,000. Current memberships at SCPR are also at an all-time high of 73,196 members. SCPR’s revenues are projected to reach $32.5 million in 2019, also a record. Community News faithfernandez More » ShareTweetShare on Google+Pin on PinterestSend with WhatsApp,Virtual Schools PasadenaHomes Solve Community/Gov/Pub SafetyCitizen Service CenterPASADENA EVENTS & ACTIVITIES CALENDARClick here for Movie Showtimes Name (required)  Mail (required) (not be published)  Website  Community News ShareShareTweetSharePin it last_img read more

Royal Thai Navy Assumes Command from Royal Danish Navy

first_img View post tag: Danish View post tag: Command Royal Thai Navy Assumes Command from Royal Danish Navy Back to overview,Home naval-today Royal Thai Navy Assumes Command from Royal Danish Navy View post tag: Assumes Authorities March 30, 2012 View post tag: Thai View post tag: Royal The royal Thai navy assumed command from the royal Danish navy as Commander Combined Task Force (CTF) 151, during a change of command ceremony onboard USS Halsey (DDG 97), Muscat, Oman, March 29.Rear Adm. Tanin Likitawong, royal Thai navy, relieved Commodore Aage Buur Jensen, royal Danish navy,The ceremony concluded the royal Danish navy’s first command of CTF 151, which consisted of a multinational staff embarked in Halsey. The three month operation further strengthened ties with other counter-piracy naval forces on operations in the region, as well as further developing communication and collaboration within the merchant shipping community.Jensen’s tenure as commander of CTF 151 included visits at sea to the flagships of Commander CTF 465 European Naval Force (EUNAVFOR), Capt. Jorge Manso, and Commander CTF 508 NATO, Rear Adm. Siman A. Tosum, as well as a meeting onboard the Adm. Tributs, flagship to Capt. Ilder Ahmerov, commander of the Russian counter-piracy task group in the region. “Counter-piracy is a matter of concern for all nations and should be dealt with by all nations,” said Jensen of his time as commander of CTF 151. He continued to highlight the coordination with the European Union, NATO, and independent deployers as an outstanding example of international cooperation, with all partners showed willingness to do their upmost to achieve the common aim of defeating piracy.Since January CTF 151 has disrupted four piracy action groups (PAG), and conducted coastal monitoring for piracy activity along the northern area of the Horn of Africa, and the south Somali coast. International partnerships and eagerness to share information and assets has lead to a drop in piracy in the region. From the time January-March 2012 there was a decrease in piracy attacks on vessels from 41 to 11, and successful pirating from 13 to four over the same period in 2011.“It is my intent to continue the outstanding efforts of Commodore Jensen, and the progress which he and his team onboard Hasley have made countering piracy in this region,” said Tanin. “I am also greatly looking forward to working with all the different nations of CMF.”CTF 151 is one of three task forces under control of Combined Maritime Forces (CMF), based in Bahrain. CTF 151 was established in 2009 to deter, disrupt and suppress piracy, protect maritime vessels of any nationality and secure freedom of navigation for the benefit of all. CTF 151’s area of operation encompasses 1.1 million square miles in the Gulf of Aden and Somali Basin.[mappress]Naval Today Staff , March 30, 2012; Image: navy View post tag: from View post tag: News by topic View post tag: Naval Share this article View post tag: Navylast_img read more

A modern take on… Chocolate Mini Meringues with ganache and pistachio

first_imgWhen making meringues, it is very important that all your equipment (bowls, mixers, spatulas, spoons) are completely clean, since the slightest trace of grease can ruin the outcome. Rub equipment with lemon juice, then rinse and dry completely to remove all traces of fat.Makes approximately 20IngredientsLarge egg whites (room temperature)3Lemon juice1/2tspPinch of saltSuperfine (caster) sugar140gDivine or other good cocoa1 tbspDivine or other good dark chocolate (min 70% cocoa solids)200gShelled pistachios (rough chop or pulse in a food processoruntil in small chunks but not powder)100gMethod1. In a medium bowl, beat the egg whites, lemon juice and salt until fluffy, starting on a low speed and gradually increasing until soft peaks form. Slowly beat in the sugar 2tbsp at a time and continue beating on a high speed until stiff peaks form. Fold in the cocoa.2. Pipe or spoon the meringue on to two lined baking trays to form little ’pyramids’.3. Bake for 1 hour at 100C or until set, then turn off the oven and leave the meringue inside to dry for another hour.4. Melt the chocolate in a metal bowl over a saucepan of simmering water.5. Finally, remove from the heat and carefully dip the bottom of each meringue in the chocolate. Allow any excess to drip off and then dip the chocolate coated part in the chopped pistachios.www.lilyvanilli.com/the-bakerylast_img read more

Artist touts ‘primacy’ of images

first_imgWilliam Kentridge, the South African artist, animator, sculptor, drawing master, opera designer, and mime, can now add poet to his list of credits, since he is Harvard’s 2011-12 Charles Eliot Norton Professor of Poetry.That makes him the latest in a long list of great artists, writers, composers, and poets who since 1926 have delivered Harvard’s Norton Lectures, sponsored this year by the Mahindra Humanities Center at Harvard. (Among past lecturers — all charged with advancing the understanding of “poetry in the broadest sense” in at least six lectures — were T.S. Eliot, Robert Frost, Leonard Bernstein, and Umberto Eco.)The 56-year-old Kentridge, who is gray-haired, funny, and still the supple mime, calls his lecture series “Six Drawing Lessons.” He roamed the stage at Sanders Theatre last Tuesday to deliver “In Praise of Shadows,” the inaugural talk. (The next, “A Brief History of Colonial Revolts,” is in Sanders at 4 p.m. on March 27.)Kentridge received the invitation from Harvard 10 months ago, an honor that occasioned a conversation with his father, who asked: “Do you have anything to say?” In the end, the artist decided on a simple plan of attack for lecturing at Harvard: “I listed every thought I have ever had, then divided it by six.”The “shadows” of the first lecture are those in “The Allegory of the Cave.” They flicker illusory and imprecise on a cave wall in Plato’s greatest work, “The Republic,” written around 360 B.C.E.Plato invented those shadows as a puppet theater of reality for denizens of the cave, as stand-ins for humans, who have been shackled neck and foot since childhood so they can only see forward. The trope served as Plato’s view of how people apprehend the real world: as a poor copy of reality, as shadows on a wall.That cave, and those deceiving shadows, said Kentridge, would be the centerpiece of the lecture series. “This is about the necessary movement from images to ideas,” he said, and also about the eventual “primacy of the image.”Looming behind Kentridge onstage was a broad screen, and on it appeared first the artist’s heaven and hell: a blank notebook. Over the next hour, that notebook filled with a fluid supplementary video of scrawls, lines, blocks of type, bits of cinema, and phrases that acted like chapter headings. Kentridge’s own flickering hands moved everything about.Early on, he showed a Plato-like fragment of “Shadow Procession,” his 1999 animation of the human condition. It is a foot parade of suffering, “a catalog of people on the move,” said Kentridge, inspired by street scenes from Johannesburg. Cutout puppets, hinged at the joints and in silhouette, limp, labor, and struggle to carry bits and bundles — even a city skyline. Plato’s philosopher, unshackled and free because he has seen the real light of knowledge, has a duty to return to the cave and free everyone, said Kentridge of that straggling procession. “If necessary, this has to be done by force.”Perhaps the best way to do that is not through Plato’s vaunted reason or his intellectualizing of the surrounding world. Perhaps better is the force of art, Kentridge said, “a need to arrive at meaning” beyond spoken or written words. Kentridge imagined the logical and the rational as being states of mind that just hover over the real world and never really penetrate it.But art penetrates. Humans “need to arrive at meaning,” said Kentridge, and what better way than to fall in with an artist “filling sheets of paper with signs and images.” In trying to capture reality in an image, he said, “the drawing becomes a meeting point” between image and reality. It becomes meaning, in all its glorious imprecision.Kentridge called drawing “making a safe place for uncertainty,” and he hoped that his lectures could help do the same.Plato’s would-be philosophers are unshackled and walk up toward the light of the real sun, Kentridge said, turning their backs on the shadows that flicker from the light of a fire. But then they are blinded, he explained, using the image of an eclipse of the sun. “All of Plato’s philosophical world has been simply blinded.”The artist, however, is instead a master of looking at the light of the world in the oblique. To look at the eclipse, he puts a pinhole in a piece of paper and lets the blotted sun flow through that. Art intercedes. Instead of rationality’s blindness, he said, there is “the mute crescent of darkness eating into the sun” without harm.Kentridge remembered the sun-scattering foliage at home in South Africa, where during an eclipse “there were as many moons as where the sunlight fell … 1,000 spots of light for every spot of darkness.”So art exceeds the purely rational by multiplying versions of a single reality, like the eclipse — for a time when “every pinhole had its own sun,” he said. In this “promiscuity of projection” comes the promise that art makes to the world: Reality, instead of being a single shining thing, is a container for multitudes of meanings.In that “universal archive” of light — as in art — there is also “everything that has happened on Earth … every event that has happened on Earth,” said Kentridge. We can see Pontius Pilate washing his hands, he said, and Martin Luther nailing his 95 Theses to a church door. But as in art, “every action, heroic and shameful, was there to be seen … Every foolishness is there.”So art makes us naked and helpless in the face of light, or truth, but it also makes our own messages heard, said Kentridge. We are no longer that procession of shadows.Plato was after the sun alone, the shining knowledge that stood at the peak of a hierarchy that descended from there to belief, illusion, and eventually delusion. That hierarchy opened the way to tragedy, said Kentridge, since knowledge always bring the right to power, and “the right to power is always the right to violence.” (More on that in the next lecture, he said.)Back in the studio, projected on the big screen in Sanders, we see Plato as a typewriter, a machine of letters alone, said Kentridge. “What hope is there in it?”The Norton Lectures are free and open to the public. Tickets are required and available beginning at noon on the day of each lecture at the Harvard Box Office or by phone (service charge applies to phone orders) at 617.496.2222. They also are available starting at 2 p.m. at Sanders Theatre. Limit two tickets per person.last_img read more

Reigate & Redhill

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