Democrats Push To be Heard Though They Have Little Power

first_imgMay 7, 2019  By Emily KettererTheStatehouseFile.comINDIANAPOLIS – Sen. Greg Taylor told members of the Senate to “buckle up” for another one of his lengthy speeches on hate crimes.Taylor, of Indianapolis, is one of 10 Democrats in the 50-member Senate and he knows he won’t change anybody’s mind because the issue has already been decided. He and Democrats in the General Assembly are vocal even if they know it, they stand little chance of changing legislation with one party ruling the chamber.“This is the part of democracy that we all miss,” Taylor said. “Everybody believes when we get up on the floor and we’re having a discussion, we’re debating the issue.“What we’re talking about here is making sure the public understands what we’re saying.”Republicans control two-thirds or more of the seats in each chamber in the General Assembly, enough to convene and pass laws without Democrats. The last time they wielded any significant influence was in 2012 when Republicans passed right-to-work laws that undercut unions. Democrats walked out, stopping work in the House because Republicans did not have a quorum to pass laws alone. That is impossible now.The Republican party has held the supermajority in the Senate since the 1990s, but in the House, the majority parties flip-flopped until 2010 when Republicans look over and eventually gained a supermajority.Indiana joins 22 other states whose legislatures hold supermajorities in one or both chambers, and the state is one of 16 Republican supermajorities.The GOP controls so many seats because Indiana is a red state, said Sen. Jim Merritt, R-Indianapolis. He said there may be one or two Indiana districts that maybe don’t belong in his party, but overall, Republicans still win the most votes.“We run good campaigns,” Merritt said. “It’s still a Republican state.”That doesn’t mean they leave the Democrats out on the Senate floor, even though they could, he said.But on a major vote Senate Republicans did vote on bills without Democrats present. That happened in February after Democrats walked out in protest to an amendment that stripped down the hate crimes bill.That was a rare event, Merritt said, adding, “It happened once this year, but that was because we had to get work done.”But most of the time the GOP majority includes the minority party, Merritt said. “They’re Hoosiers. It’s important to have a bridge between the two parties.”Still, being in a minority position left Democrats to address the issues on their agenda through amendments to existing bills.Raising teacher pay was one of their biggest goals and Rep. Ed DeLaney, D-Indianapolis, offered amendments to raise salaries to a $40,000 minimum. He was quickly shut down.Paid family leave was another issue, and Sen. Karen Tallian, D-Portage, had a bill that passed the Senate but failed to get a hearing in the House.And on the budget, Democrats in the House called 27 amendments and only passed one and a half, which did include protections for pre-existing conditions in health insurance. The Senate Democrats passed five budget amendments out of 31 called.As a result of the imbalance in power, much of the debate occurs within the parties behind closed doors in caucus meeting without input from the other side. Democrats argue that even though those meetings are legal for both parties, they discourage open debate and undermine democracy.“While we’re talking about what-ifs,” Taylor said of Democrats. “They’re [Republicans] talking about what’s going to happen.”This was made clear during the process of passing the hate crimes legislation. Senate Republicans made the decision in caucus to strip out the list of protected characteristics, including race, gender identity, sexual orientation, disability and more, from the original bill. The Democrats protested the change, and there was little debate from the majority party on the floor and the bill passed without the list.“A lot of people that day didn’t talk on the topic because we did more listening than we did talking,” Merritt said. “The chamber hadn’t been that quiet all session.”Similarly, in the House, a public committee hearing was not given to the original hate crimes bill, and Republicans added hate crimes language into a drug sentencing bill. This was all done behind closed doors in caucus meetings.“What happened in the House was obnoxious, cowardly, disrespectful misuse of the system,” said Tallian on the Senate floor as senators were about to send the bill to the governor. “There was no committee debate. Instead, it was slipped in a second-reading amendment like a thief in the night.”However, Merritt said party caucus meetings are not used to make decisions behind closed doors. He said he and his party use their meetings to learn more about the issues to be on the same page because some lawmakers know more about a topic than others.“We haven’t squashed debate,” Merritt said. “I really didn’t know a lot about payday loans until we started caucusing, just having conversations. You can’t really do that on the floor.”But having a majority that can do what they want without the other party ultimately doesn’t serve the legislature very well, said Republican Rep. Dan Leonard of Huntington, who has been in both the minority and majority party during his time in the General Assembly.He said he hates supermajorities because that can lead to the majority party getting “sloppy” when passing bills. He said in order to pass better legislation, both parties need to have equal say.“You get to the point where I could say, ‘I don’t want to listen to you, I don’t have time for you. And it’s not going to make a difference anyway because we’re going to outvote you,’” Leonard said. “A supermajority makes it worse because we don’t even need the Democrats. They can just walk out.”Bringing the voices “There’s a lot of things that the Indiana Democrats would probably love to see pass in the legislation, but they know darn well that’s not going to happen,” said Laura Merrifield Wilson, assistant professor of political science at the University of Indianapolis.“They can’t necessarily prevent bills from becoming laws, but they can do everything in their power to challenge and critically analyze.”Senate Minority Leader Tim Lanane, D-Anderson, said as the minority, they know they don’t have a huge impact, and they also know they can’t just do nothing.“We may not have the votes all the time, but we have the voices,” Lanane said. “And if we just sit there and do nothing, then we have failed.”In the House, DeLaney said he feels like he is shouting into the void to his Republican colleagues because sometimes they don’t always pay attention to him.He cited the cigarette tax as an example. He said no one in the Republican party will get up and say that smoking isn’t bad, but still won’t listen to Democrats. An amendment to increase the tax was proposed one final time on the state budget when it was in the Senate, and Sen. Randy Head, R-Logansport, said––speaking on behalf of the Senate Republicans–– he and the caucus support a tax, just not this year.Merrifield Wilson said in most cases, the Indiana Democrats have to stick together to keep their numbers in votes, and for Republicans, they are at a bigger risk for speaking out against their own party in terms of their reputation.“For the Republicans that disagree, you’re not disagreeing with the opposition here, you’re disagreeing with your own party. There’s a lot more at stake for them … they understand the larger picture,” Merrifield Wilson said.But Merritt said members of his party feel free to vote their conscience and cites the Senate’s original hate crimes bill as an example. He was among seven Senate Republicans to vote against the stripped-down legislation.“What I do is when I do that, I make myself clear on what my position is,” he said.Like hate crimes, there are issues that cut across party lines. The bill that expands gambling to allow sports wagering and a new casino in Terre Haute needed the support of both parties. The final vote in the House was 59-36 with 22 Democrats and 37 Republicans voting yes.At the end of the session, Lanane noted that Democrats were instrumental in killing a controversial payday lending bill that would have allowed lenders to charge interest rates far exceeding the state’s 72 percent annual limit.“Thank goodness for the Democrats,” he said.FOOTNOTE: Emily Ketterer is a reporter for TheStatehouseFile.com, a news website powered by Franklin College journalism students.Print Friendly, PDF & EmailFacebookTwitterCopy LinkEmailSharelast_img read more

Down on the farm

first_imgSpring Lane Farm in Mapperley, Nottingham, is a working farm, solely producing products to sell on-site – from free range eggs and vegetables to fresh meat.The idea of opening a bakery evolved because the butchery was having to sell forequarter meat from the cattle as stewing steak and mince. So they decided to use it to make pies and, coupled with customer demand, the prospect of a bakery became more commercially appealing.Mark says: “All our beef is home-produced as are all the vegetables and free-range eggs, so it was just a question of squeezing as much value out of our products as we could.”The bakery, aided by a Defra grant of £38,000 under the Rural Enterprise Scheme, which helps farmers adapt to changing markets and develop new business opportunities, took 12 months to complete.Housed in a converted Dutch Barn, the bakery and shop is a 45ft x 30ft steel-framed building with a cement fibre roof, which sits next to the farm shop. The one-time redundant farm building, now converted into a bakery, sits on a 250-acre site, and complements the existing butchery and farm shop.keeping it in the familyThe farm and bakery, which opened in September 2006, are owned by the Spencer family, which has been farming there since 1939.The farm is now run by two generations – Cyril and Dorothy and their son Mark, 36, and his wife Claire. Much of the conversion work was carried out by Mark and Cyril to make the project more cost-effective.The Spencers chose to go down the route of handmade traditionally baked, high-quality products. Speciality bread includes tomato and herb, date and walnut, blue cheese and walnut, and cheese and onion. Other bread includes white, wholemeal, Granary and white Granary, using Hovis flour.Cakes, scones and tarts sit at the top end of the range and are all crammed with extra ingredients such as raisins or chocolate. Currant bread and teacakes are proving immensely popular.EQUIPMENT SOURCINGMuch of the equipment for the bakery was sourced through a local company, based in nearby Hucknall, which specialises in reconditioned and second-hand equipment. Mark’s wife, Claire, who manages both the farm shop and bakery, says: “We bought a 12-tray four-deck oven, pastry break and bun divider and a couple of mixers, plus other bits and pieces. The shelving came from the stockist we used before to equip the farm shop.”We wanted to keep the whole feel rustic and rural-looking because, after all, we are on a working farm.”All the products are packaged bearing the Spring Lane Farm logo, which is printed at point of sale. “It has been an expensive venture to get going, so we have had to watch our outlay. One of our best investments has been the logo, which has paid dividends because customers now start to recognise our goods as a brand. They like that because it gives them continuity.”The shop’s customer base is mainly local people who are interested in how and where their food is produced. If a customer goes into the butchery department, they can see the meat being cut up and prepared. The same is true with the bakery, where they can see bread and cakes being made.The bakery also supplies one or two local nursing homes and children’s nurseries and carries out the occasional delivery.The most valuable marketing tool has been word-of-mouth and the farm produces a quarterly newsletter to keep its customers informed about any new developments.Claire says: “It has taken a lot of hard work to get the project up and running, but it is lovely to see it come to fruition, and we are really excited about it.” n—-=== Planning problems ===Although the family are essentially farmers, they are happy to have gone down the diversification route with their shops, because it means they can carry on doing what they love – farming – and still make a living from the land by supplying local demand. But plans to diversify have met with one major stumbling block: the local council.”We have been on a steep learning curve and we have had to take every opportunity to diversify,” says Claire. “We have a farm shop, butchery, bakery and the farm, so where do we go next? Well the natural thing seems to be – and our customers have already started to mention it – a coffee shop.”However it has all been a complicated process because, technically, we are in a greenbelt area and we have a constant battle with our local planning authority. It is so infuriating because we are an expanding business employing more and more local staff, but they don’t seem to see that.”We still have redundant farm buildings on our land which we could convert into a coffee shop, so we wouldn’t even be putting up a new building on a greenbelt site,” she adds. “In the long term, we want to make it a nice experience for our customers and if that means a coffee shop as well, then we will try to make it happen.”—-=== Rural job creation ===The bakery installation created four jobs, including a bakery manager and an assistant manager.Bakery manager Bob Crampton, now 57, owned a wholesale bakery in nearby Carlton for 25 years and, after selling it as a going concern, retired for three years. However, he found he missed the baking side, but not the hassle of running his own business. So when the opportunity arose at Spring Lane Farm, he jumped at it.The first time he saw the bakery it was an empty shell and he says he was “just so excited about the prospect of being in at the beginning of a new project”.Assistant bakery manager Mark Riddle comes from a mixed background of in-store and craft bakeries. “I just like the whole traditional craft baking approach because I prefer to create the goods from scratch. There is no par-baking or premixes, it’s about weighing up individual ingredients and we know exactly what is being put in the bread, how it will come out and that the quality will be the best possible.”Manager Claire Spencer adds: “We decided right from the start that we would employ bakery staff, as we were naive about the industry. The bakery would have been too much for me to manage, so I pay the wages and look after the staff. Bob and Mark do what they love doing best – baking.”last_img read more

Roger Waters Announces New Album “Is This The Life We Really Want?” With Teaser Video

first_imgRoger Waters has been hinting at a new album for some time now, even recently posting a photo with Radiohead producer Nigel Godrich together in the studio. Today he confirms new music with an official announcement. Dubbed Is This the Life We Really Want?, the upcoming project comes 25 years after the Pink Floyd bassist’s most recent solo album, Amused To Death(1992).The announcement came strong with a video on his Facebook page, with a sample of the new music over a video that eventually displays the album title Is This the Life We Really Want?. With no other details, Rogers promises the album is “coming soon.” The album title seems to hint that there will be some political dialogue, as Rogers has been an outspoken voice against political corruption for decades – even recently sharing official footage of the “Pigs (Three Different Ones)” performance on Inauguration Day with the caption “A note from Roger: The resistance begins today.” Get a taste of what to expect from the new album below:Waters is currently preparing for his upcoming Us And Them North American tour, which kicks off end of May and extends through late October. The tour is named after the iconic song on 1973 Pink Floyd album Dark Side Of The Moon, on which Waters recently reflected in an interview with NPR. Waters says, “I was listening to [the song] the other day. There’s a line which goes, ‘With, without, and who’ll deny that’s what the fighting’s all about?’ And the answer to the question is this: Almost everyone. Almost everyone will deny that ‘with/without’ is what the fighting’s all about. My contention is that it is. That’s why my new tour is going to be called ‘Us and Them.’ It’s specifically about that line.”Waters promises a mixture of Pink Floyd songs, solo material, and songs from the upcoming album! Check out the full tour schedule below.Roger Waters Tour DatesMay 26, Kansas City, MO Sprint CenterMay 28, Louisville, KY KFC Yum! CenterMay 30, St. Louis, MO Scottrade CenterJune 1, Tulsa, OK BOK CenterJune 3, Denver, CO Pepsi CenterJune 7, San Jose, CA SAP Center at San JoseJune 12, Sacramento, CA Golden 1 CenterJune 14, Phoenix, AZ Gila River ArenaJune 16, Las Vegas, NV T-Mobile ArenaJune 20, Los Angeles, CA STAPLES CenterJune 21, Los Angeles, CA STAPLES CenterJune 24, Seattle, WA Tacoma DomeJuly 3, Dallas, TX American Airlines CenterTBD San Antonio, TX AT&T CenterJuly 6, Houston, TX Toyota CenterJuly 11, Tampa, FL Amalie ArenaJuly 13, Miami, FL American Airlines ArenaJuly 16, Atlanta, GA Infinite Energy CenterJuly 18, Greensboro, NC Greensboro ColiseumJuly 20, Columbus, OH Nationwide ArenaJuly 22, Chicago, IL United CenterJuly 23, Chicago, IL United CenterJuly 26, St. Paul, MN Xcel Energy CenterAugust 2, Detroit, MI The Palace of Auburn HillsAugust 4, Washington, DC Verizon CenterAugust 8, Philadelphia, PA Wells Fargo CenterAugust 9, Philadelphia, PA Wells Fargo CenterSept. 7, Newark, NJ Prudential CenterSept. 11, Brooklyn, NY Barclays CenterSept. 12, Brooklyn, NY Barclays CenterSept. 15, Uniondale, NY Nassau ColiseumSept. 19, Pittsburgh, PA PPG Paints ArenaSept. 27, Boston, MA TD GardenSept. 28, Boston, MA TD GardenOct. 2, Toronto, ON Air Canada CentreOct. 3, Toronto, ON Air Canada CentreOct. 6, Quebec City, QC Videotron CentreOct. 10, Ottawa, ON Canadian Tire CentreOct. 16, Montreal, QC Bell CentreTBD Winnipeg, MB MTS CentreOct. 24, Edmonton, AB Rogers PlaceOct. 28, Vancouver, BC Rogers Arena,Waters promises a mixture of Pink Floyd songs, solo material, and songs from the upcoming album! Check out the full tour schedule below.Roger Waters Tour DatesMay 26, Kansas City, MO Sprint CenterMay 28, Louisville, KY KFC Yum! CenterMay 30, St. Louis, MO Scottrade CenterJune 1, Tulsa, OK BOK CenterJune 3, Denver, CO Pepsi CenterJune 7, San Jose, CA SAP Center at San JoseJune 12, Sacramento, CA Golden 1 CenterJune 14, Phoenix, AZ Gila River ArenaJune 16, Las Vegas, NV T-Mobile ArenaJune 20, Los Angeles, CA STAPLES CenterJune 21, Los Angeles, CA STAPLES CenterJune 24, Seattle, WA Tacoma DomeJuly 3, Dallas, TX American Airlines CenterTBD San Antonio, TX AT&T CenterJuly 6, Houston, TX Toyota CenterJuly 11, Tampa, FL Amalie ArenaJuly 13, Miami, FL American Airlines ArenaJuly 16, Atlanta, GA Infinite Energy CenterJuly 18, Greensboro, NC Greensboro ColiseumJuly 20, Columbus, OH Nationwide ArenaJuly 22, Chicago, IL United CenterJuly 23, Chicago, IL United CenterJuly 26, St. Paul, MN Xcel Energy CenterAugust 2, Detroit, MI The Palace of Auburn HillsAugust 4, Washington, DC Verizon CenterAugust 8, Philadelphia, PA Wells Fargo CenterAugust 9, Philadelphia, PA Wells Fargo CenterSept. 7, Newark, NJ Prudential CenterSept. 11, Brooklyn, NY Barclays CenterSept. 12, Brooklyn, NY Barclays CenterSept. 15, Uniondale, NY Nassau ColiseumSept. 19, Pittsburgh, PA PPG Paints ArenaSept. 27, Boston, MA TD GardenSept. 28, Boston, MA TD GardenOct. 2, Toronto, ON Air Canada CentreOct. 3, Toronto, ON Air Canada CentreOct. 6, Quebec City, QC Videotron CentreOct. 10, Ottawa, ON Canadian Tire CentreOct. 16, Montreal, QC Bell CentreTBD Winnipeg, MB MTS CentreOct. 24, Edmonton, AB Rogers PlaceOct. 28, Vancouver, BC Rogers Arenalast_img read more

NDSP investigates attempted rape report

first_imgNotre Dame Security Police (NDSP) is investigating an attempted rape reported Monday, according to an email sent to students Monday evening. The reported sexual assault occurred in a men’s residence hall on North Quad late Friday or in the early morning hours Saturday, police said. The assault was committed by an acquaintance of the victim. NDSP said it has no evidence this case is connected with the incident described in the Crime Alert email it sent to the student body Saturday. In the email, police warned students of the risk of sexual assault. “Sexual assault can happen to anyone,” the email stated. “College students are more likely to be assaulted by an acquaintance than a stranger. This means that the person perpetrating the assault could be part of the campus community. “Being aware of your own safety and watching out for your friends are important steps you can take to reduce the risk of sexual assault.” Information about sexual assault prevention and resources for survivors of sexual assault are available online from NDSP and the Committee on Sexual Assault Prevention.last_img read more

“Global Peanut Research”

As the federal government ponders the future of farm programs, one research group is preparing for life with or without price supports. The Peanut Collaborative Research Support Program is finding worldwide solutions now that may help Georgia farmers in the future. “Peanuts are a global crop with global problems,” said John Williams, assistant program director of the Peanut CRSP at the University of Georgia Agricultural Experiment Station in Griffin. “Peanuts have leaf spot wherever they grow,” he said. “Wherever peanuts are grown, used or stored, aflatoxin is a problem. The research we support in utilization has no boundaries. Some of it is focused on small producers, but that’s scale. Those technologies can be scaled up much easier than scaled down.” The Peanut CRSP uses international research to solve the global and domestic problems of growing peanuts. “The Peanut CRSP is the outcome of an act of Congress to deploy the skills and knowledge of the land-grant system for development,” Williams said. “The goal is to achieve peanut technology that helps both developing countries and the United States.” One of the program’s major focuses is creating new peanut products. “Developing products outside the United States promotes consumption, which encourages exports and trade,” Williams said. Scientists at the UGA Center for Food Safety and Quality Enhancement in Griffin add to the program. They’ve focused on product development in the Philippines and Thailand and post-harvest handling and storage in Jamaica and Belize. In 1996, a new project began in Bulgaria. One of the greatest possibilities for U.S. farmers is oil. “The potential is spectacular for peanuts,” Williams said. “The oil from peanuts, from a health perspective, equals the quality of olive oil.” Olive oil sells for three to four times the price of other oils. “We’re working to help expand that quality market. And we’re going to be promoting these desirable high-oleic oils so people move to frying with healthier oils,” Williams said. “The general peanut oil isn’t as healthy as canola or olive oil. But these new ones are,” he said. “They match very closely with olive oil’s health qualities. Down the road, it’s going to be really important.” The CRSP research also enables farmers to grow peanuts with lower input costs. “On a global scale, a sustained development of technologies has led to better varieties,” Williams said. “There are a number of components of that. One is developing and accessing germ plasm. Many of the problems with peanuts have cheap solutions in the genetics.” That long-term investment into resistance is going to be important. “The people outside the United States have been more concerned up until now, because they’ve had to compete on a world-price basis,” he said. “So for them, cheap technology to control diseases has a greater priority than here.” The long-term survival of the American peanut industry may depend on using such technology. “Certainly it could help reduce chemical inputs,” he said. “And you will have to use other technologies like integrated pest management that use resistance, management techniques and a small amount of chemicals.” One of the CRSP successes is research that takes genes from wild relatives and puts them into peanuts to create resistances. Farmers now can buy varieties resistant to leaf spot disease, which costs Georgia farmers $100 to $150 per acre per year for chemical control. “The opportunity is there through resistances to cut that to $50 per acre,” Williams said. The Peanut CRSP can show a $10 U.S. return for every $1 spent from the release of new varieties, he said. “When the program was started there was a great deal of cry about why Congress was spending all this money to make other countries more competitive,” Williams said. “That probably has changed.” read more

NEC Energy installs Europe’s largest battery storage system

first_img FacebookTwitterLinkedInEmailPrint分享Microgrid Knowledge:Boston-based NEC Energy Solutions (NEC) has completed installation of Europe’s largest battery system, 48-MW of energy storage that will provide reactive power in Germany to stabilize the transmission grid.NEC developed the project in Jardelund for German company EnspireME, a joint venture between Japan’s Mitsubishi and Eneco, a Netherlands-based renewable energy company. With 50 MWh of capacity, the system uses 10,000 lithium-ion battery modules, enough to store power for about 5,300 German households for 24 hours.The battery system can play multiple roles to strengthen the grid. It will earn revenue by serving the primary reserve market. This opportunity exists because Europe’s transmission system operators must secure a certain number of capacity reserves to prepare for sudden power loss or an extensive blackout.EnspireME will sell storage capacity to the German electricity market through weekly common auctions where European grid operators purchase reserve capacity to guarantee a 50 hertz frequency on the grid.The energy storage system can also take over the role of primary reserve provider and become a more sustainable alternative to coal and gas-fired plants. In addition, the project can serve local wind farms by allowing them to store excess electricity generated during periods when they cannot sell their output into markets because of excess supply.More: NEC installs Europe’s largest battery system NEC Energy installs Europe’s largest battery storage systemlast_img read more

Another Edition of the “Press Correspondent” Course Completed in Uruguay

first_imgBy Nastasia Barceló/Diálogo September 23, 2016 The National Peace Operations Training Institute of Uruguay (ENOPU per its Spanish acronym), and the Uruguayan Army’s Department of Social Communication, jointly organized another edition of the “Press Correspondent” course, which took place from August 15th to 18th. The course was divided into two days: theoretical lessons at ENOPU and two practical activities at the Sixth Abra de Castellanos Military Camp. During the theoretical classes, participants learned about the current situation of the peacekeeping missions in the Congo and Haiti, where Uruguayan Armed Forces are participating, among others. Instructors from the Uruguayan Navy, Air Force, and Army were present. During this first day, participants also learned about humanitarian demining, preventive health measures, negotiation, and basic equipment. Official Army sources highlighted the presence of well-known local journalists such as Martín Sarthou, who shared his extensive personal and work experience in conflict zones with those present. Among the participants was Ensign Mariana Meza, who works in the Army’s Department of Social Communication. She stressed that “professionals from relevant Uruguayan media outlets and three professionals from foreign media channels participated, as well as students from journalism schools from both the University of the Republic and private institutions like the Catholic University of Uruguay.” Ensign Meza added that “The main objective was to give the journalists the tools they need to work in a hostile environment and to provide them with life-saving techniques for different scenarios, whether it be during a negotiation or a direct assault.” However, “the course was also geared towards informing the students about the tasks and the functions that our country has during peacekeeping missions, as well as the specific characteristics about where the armed forces are present,” she concluded. Engineers in action The course’s practical activities took place during the afternoons of August 16th and 17th at the Abra Military Camp. The Engineer Instruction Center provided instructors and specialists in areas such as humanitarian demining and water purification. In order to hone their observation skills, they debated situations which the communications professionals could face while covering the news in certain conflict areas. The Air Force also explained how to correctly board a military helicopter. Humanitarian demining and water purification In relation to humanitarian demining instruction, participants attended theoretical/practical classes on characteristics of demining, such as the types of mines and equipment used and how they work. The specialists also held demonstrations on how to react when faced with an explosion. Likewise, they watched demonstrations on water purification and learned how a portable water purifier works in remote areas where there is no electricity. It is a system that can produce 1 gallon/3.8 liters of potable water per minute from sources of freshwater such as wells, lakes, ponds, rivers, and flooded areas. In the Abra de Castellanos area, students had the opportunity to observe deployment in mission areas, the transport of armored vehicles, checkpoint procedures, night vision goggle use, and proper handling of security elements. Civil-military cooperation The Press Correspondent course is well known among journalists and military members throughout Uruguay. Ensign Meza pointed out that, historically, “officers invite journalists from Uruguay to travel with them and embed themselves in the missions’ military bases, offering journalists the chance to have access to places and situations they wouldn’t otherwise have the opportunity to access by themselves.” For his part, Uruguayan journalist Martin Sarthou stressed the importance of educational programs like these: “They provide more freedom and security to the correspondents who work in the field where there are Uruguayan military contingents. At the same time, our work provides a first-hand account of the work carried out by the peacekeeping missions.” He also said that “the only restrictions that the Army has placed on us journalists are the ones that have to do with safety measures concerning security in conflict zones. What we are trying to avoid is for a reporter to become a martyr for their profession merely because they don’t know the dangers that can exist in peace mission areas.”last_img read more

52 Evacuated After East Northport Fire

first_imgSign up for our COVID-19 newsletter to stay up-to-date on the latest coronavirus news throughout New York More than 50 people—including three families forced to temporarily move into a hotel—were evacuated from an East Northport building after a fire ripped through Friday afternoon. Suffolk County police said the blaze at the Larkfield Road commercial building, which is also connected to residential apartments, started in the rear work area of Vacuum Cleaners Sales and Service around 3 p.m. Three families—eight people in four apartments—were relocated by the Red Cross to the Hampton Inn in Commack, police said. Forty-two other residents were temporarily moved to a Salvation Army shelter until electricity and heat were restored to their apartments. The temperature was in the teens during much of the day Friday. In total, 52 residents were evacuated, police said. Investigators are still looking into the cause of the fire, but it doesn’t appear to be criminal, police said. Nobody was injured.last_img read more

Elmont Armed Home Invasion Trio Sought

first_imgSign up for our COVID-19 newsletter to stay up-to-date on the latest coronavirus news throughout New York Nassau County police are investigating an armed home invasion in Elmont that occurred two months ago, authorities said Tuesday in a wanted poster seeking the public’s help in solving the crime.Three masked men entered a Louis Avenue through an unlocked side door, walked upstairs, brandished black handguns and demanded money from the occupants at 9:30 p.m. Sunday, Nov. 15, police said.When the victims said they didn’t have any money, the assailants ordered a 13-year-old girl to lie on the floor and stole her iPhone before the trio fled on foot, police said.The suspects were described as black men. The first was wearing gray jeans, a gray bubble jacket, black wool hat and gloves. The second had a mustache and was wearing a gray hooded sweatshirt, a black vest, gray sweat pants, a gray ski mask and a gray hat. The third was wearing a gray hooded sweatshirt, black jeans, black gloves and a black ski mask.Crime Stoppers is asking anyone who knows the identity or whereabouts of the subjects, or anyone with any information about this crime to call 1-800-244-TIPS(8477).last_img read more

Your brand is your consumers

first_imgIn credit unions, we tend to spend a lot of time talking about what the brand says about us (our financial institution). This is certainly important as the brand must be an accurate reflection of your unique retail culture and environment.However, a critically important element of the brand mix is sometimes overlooked. What exactly does your brand say about your consumers? What does your brand (in its entirety) say about the men and women who choose your credit union as their financial institution? What does this say to them about themselves and, just as importantly, what does this say about them to their extended circle of friends, family and colleagues?Consumers choose to do business with a particular brand for a reason. Sometimes it’s price (think Southwest Airlines). Sometimes it’s ease of access (think Amazon). Sometimes it’s experience (think Disney). Often, it is a combination of these (and other) elements. So when creating and living your financial institution’s brand, you must consider what that choice represents about your consumers. Are they choosing you because you have the fastest loan turnaround decision time in town? Because you offer the most branches and/or the best online access? Or do they prefer you over the competition because of the unique cultural environment offered by your brand? continue reading » 12SHARESShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblrlast_img read more